Ultimate space simulation software

 
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DoctorOfSpace
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The most massive black holes in the Universe

12 Jul 2021 21:48

Either way, trajectories in SE are completely Euclidean and Kerr interiors would be extremely difficult to implement.
Visually at least, it can be done, ringularity and all, but extremely heavy on performance.
Image
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As for surviving such a trip, well, you wouldn't ever get this close to a singularity.
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The most massive black holes in the Universe

13 Jul 2021 03:27

Figured he was working on Kerr interiors too since he made the post on this page about Kerr black holes:
I didn't see any correlations, it just seemed somewhat relevant. Either way, trajectories in SE are completely Euclidean and Kerr interiors would be extremely difficult to implement.
I wonder how much computational power would be needed?  It would be ironic if we'd need quantum computers to model relativity, and by then we'd be onto a workable theory of quantum gravity which would replace relativity at the "singularity" and truly reveal what it was.....and then what would we need to model quantum gravity?
I don't think we can say much about quantum computers now, we're essentially 60s people wondering where computing will go.
[dah<500,26>dah<180,14>dah<180,21>dah<500,19>dah<180,26>dah<500,21>]
 
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The most massive black holes in the Universe

13 Jul 2021 03:35

Visually at least, it can be done, ringularity and all, but extremely heavy on performance.
Does this guy's simulation take into account the motion of the camera?
[dah<500,26>dah<180,14>dah<180,21>dah<500,19>dah<180,26>dah<500,21>]
 
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Watsisname
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The most massive black holes in the Universe

13 Jul 2021 06:25

Does this guy's simulation take into account the motion of the camera?
Sadly not, though it is still an impressive display. I had never seen a real time renderer of almost any black hole metric you might want, even for negative mass (white hole) with spin.
 
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The most massive black holes in the Universe

13 Jul 2021 09:13

Either way, trajectories in SE are completely Euclidean and Kerr interiors would be extremely difficult to implement.
Visually at least, it can be done, ringularity and all, but extremely heavy on performance.
Image
Image
Image


As for surviving such a trip, well, you wouldn't ever get this close to a singularity.
Doc there was recently a paper published on traversable wormholes that did not require exotic matter- I think you would find it interesting.
https://arxiv.org/abs/2106.05034
older article
https://arxiv.org/abs/1312.5290
 
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The most massive black holes in the Universe

13 Jul 2021 09:15

Does this guy's simulation take into account the motion of the camera?
Sadly not, though it is still an impressive display. I had never seen a real time renderer of almost any black hole metric you might want, even for negative mass (white hole) with spin.
Wat, is reverse time flow equivalent to negative mass?  For simulation purposes I mean.
Also I hope you find the above articles of interest on traversable wormholes without exotic matter (especially the more recent one.)
 
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Re: The most massive black holes in the Universe

26 Mar 2024 15:08

[font=Roboto, sans-serif]Also is it me or are all black holes in the SE very much alike?  [/font][font=Roboto, sans-serif]They all look the same...[/font]Would be nice to see something like this:
While it might look nice, it's inaccurate.  Real black hole accretion disks do not look like that, specifically with respect to the color, brightness, and how those change with distance from the center.

SE's visualization of the black holes and their accretion disks is much more close to reality and uses most of the correct physics, including the gravitational lensing (using the Schwarschild metric), and the Doppler effect due to the disk's rotation.  The effective temperature of the disk (and hence its color and brightness) as a function of distance from the center is also modeled, although not perfectly.  In reality it should be even brighter and wider -- quite the opposite of what the artist's rendition showed! :)

To be more realistic, and add some variety, black hole accretion disks could be made volumetric, and their appearance based on GRMHD simulations of disks with different accretion rates.  Real black holes also spin (Kerr metric rather than Schwarzschild), which affects how close the inner part of the accretion disk gets to the event horizon.
tbh I would still like to have a Gargantua somewhere :)

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