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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

19 Jan 2022 11:47

Cannabis compounds prevented Covid infection in a lab study / Twitter

Looks like this Oregon State study is getting a lot of attention, how cannabis compounds actually prevent the covid virus from entering cells.
 
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

27 Jan 2022 01:38

So interesting stuff going on, Dr Fauci commented on the development of a universal Covid vaccine for all current and future strains now being aggressively pursued by major companies, he said the development time will be years, not months.

There is also a new subvariant of Omicron called subvariant BA-2.  I'm curious to how they categorize these-- is it analogous to Genus-Species-Subspecies that we use in Linnaean classification?
 
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

27 Jan 2022 02:10

It's on a steep decrease here, infections was up near 90,000 per day at peak now it's down to around 40,000 a day.
Is it a real decrease, or a change in testing?  Over here we might be at the peak now, but it's because it will no longer be necessary to confirm a positive home test with an official PCR test.  At the same time members of the same household of an infected do no longer need to stay home, so the actual number of cases will likely not drop until the majority of the population has been infected, which should like a few weeks away with around 10% of the population going through covid currently, which might be fairly stable through most of January and February.  The pandemic is going into the "so what" phase.
Covid vaccine for all current and future strains now being aggressively pursued by major companies, he said the development time will be years, not months.
Since natural immunity seems to be short lived (like the flu and common cold), there is little reason to think that the vaccines will have a lasting effect.  This will be a seasonal vaccine, and most people wont need to take it.  People need to put away the idea that mass vaccination will make covid go away.
There is also a new subvariant of Omicron called subvariant BA-2.
Seems to be dominating already some places, so even more contagious, but apparently only giving mild cold symptoms for the most part like the original Omicron.
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

27 Jan 2022 05:29

It's on a steep decrease here, infections was up near 90,000 per day at peak now it's down to around 40,000 a day.
Is it a real decrease, or a change in testing?  Over here we might be at the peak now, but it's because it will no longer be necessary to confirm a positive home test with an official PCR test.  At the same time members of the same household of an infected do no longer need to stay home, so the actual number of cases will likely not drop until the majority of the population has been infected, which should like a few weeks away with around 10% of the population going through covid currently, which might be fairly stable through most of January and February.  The pandemic is going into the "so what" phase.
Covid vaccine for all current and future strains now being aggressively pursued by major companies, he said the development time will be years, not months.
Since natural immunity seems to be short lived (like the flu and common cold), there is little reason to think that the vaccines will have a lasting effect.  This will be a seasonal vaccine, and most people wont need to take it.  People need to put away the idea that mass vaccination will make covid go away.
There is also a new subvariant of Omicron called subvariant BA-2.
Seems to be dominating already some places, so even more contagious, but apparently only giving mild cold symptoms for the most part like the original Omicron.
It seems to be a real decrease.  This new variant was a gift because it replaced the more serious Delta strain which is almost gone here now.  The infection rate is down under 15 pct now from a high of around 40 pct and the crest of the wave seems to have moved to the west and south of here.
The latest prediction is the entire country will peak sometime in mid February and then there will be a pretty steep decrease.
The mass vaccination was  an illusory panacea that never really did what it was advertised to do.  I think they are now trying to convince people to keep taking booster shots every 6 months until there is a universal vaccine, good luck with that.
The more contagious but also mild new substrain is going to put the end to any Delta that was still left and then it will only be competing with the original Omicron strain so it looks like this will turn into a more contagious  version of a cold or flu.
 
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

27 Jan 2022 10:00

Not a broad statistical basis, but from our children's friends we've got a many reports of reinfection.  That is, kids that had delta mainly between September and December now get reinfected with Omicron.  Several even infected with Delta in the early December wave.  So I don't really see any indication that prior infection helps at all.
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

27 Jan 2022 11:43

Not a broad statistical basis, but from our children's friends we've got a many reports of reinfection.  That is, kids that had delta mainly between September and December now get reinfected with Omicron.  Several even infected with Delta in the early December wave.  So I don't really see any indication that prior infection helps at all.
Consistent with everything I have been hearing of friends and relatives around the US here. One family has now had it 3 times, and somewhat surprisingly the most recent (Omicron) made them the most sick.
 
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

28 Jan 2022 00:12

Consistent with everything I have been hearing of friends and relatives around the US here. One family has now had it 3 times, and somewhat surprisingly the most recent (Omicron) made them the most sick.
This is interesting.  Although having already been infected might apparently increases the chances of reinfection, I think it's very unlikely that past infection does not give some immunity.  My guess is that being infected once either means that for some reason (genetically, possibly) you are more prone to getting infected in the first place, or getting symptoms sufficiently to get tested, and/or your social risk (social life, many siblings, etc) puts you in a group likely to get infected again and again.  That is, it simply means that such factors together weigh more than the increased protection from past infections.

Another nail into the covid pass coffin.  Past infection does not meat that someone can get a free pass to do what others can't, neither does vaccination.  Europe implemented a social point system like in China without realising it.
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

28 Jan 2022 03:33

Not a broad statistical basis, but from our children's friends we've got a many reports of reinfection.  That is, kids that had delta mainly between September and December now get reinfected with Omicron.  Several even infected with Delta in the early December wave.  So I don't really see any indication that prior infection helps at all.
Mid are you hearing about all these protests in Canada and Australia? I wonder what is going on, so I got in Twitter and started talking to some people and they are adamantly opposed to the mandates.  I had a chat with an Australian person who told me that three members of their family have suffered myocardial side effects from the vaccine and when they went to their GP, they were informed that they are packed with people who have shown side effects to their heart from the vaccine?  Could this be true? We do not hear much about this from the media here.  They are worried about booster mandates because side effects with the booster have been reported to be stronger.  In one specific case a person told me they passed out while driving after getting the shot and were admitted to the hospital and were found to have heart problems for the first time in his life and he lost his job because he could not go back to work and he was very athletic but is now on bedrest because of his new heart problems and has been told not to drive or operate any machinery.
 
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

28 Jan 2022 05:08

I had a chat with an Australian person who told me that three members of their family have suffered myocardial side effects from the vaccine and when they went to their GP, they were informed that they are packed with people who have shown side effects to their heart from the vaccine?  Could this be true? We do not hear much about this from the media here.
I think there has been a fair degree of openness about that here from health authorities who have been reluctant to offer vaccines to the youngest age groups for this reason, and at the same time have been under much pressure to offer the vaccines.  Last week a second dose has been offered to the 12-15 age group, but from a health perspective it's not really recommended.  The booster is offered to the 18+ group, but not recommended for those under 45.  At the same time politicians have eased quarantine rules to those taking those unnecessary does, so go figure...  There is a conflict here in that the risk of taking the vaccine is larger for the youngest age groups than the disease itself, but that has been disregarded for the sake of limiting the spread of the virus to protect those who are at higher risk of getting seriously ill.  And further justified by that there is much we don't know about "long covid" pulling the former into doubt (which arguably is as speculative as autoimmunity concerns from the vaccines).  We now know that containing the spread strategy has failed, so I think it's safe to say that there has been much unnecessary vaccination.  To me it now seems particularly wasteful for children to get vaccinated, as it is an outdated vaccine which could even disqualify them from getting an updated vaccine in the near future.
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

03 Feb 2022 03:45

I had a chat with an Australian person who told me that three members of their family have suffered myocardial side effects from the vaccine and when they went to their GP, they were informed that they are packed with people who have shown side effects to their heart from the vaccine?  Could this be true? We do not hear much about this from the media here.
I think there has been a fair degree of openness about that here from health authorities who have been reluctant to offer vaccines to the youngest age groups for this reason, and at the same time have been under much pressure to offer the vaccines.  Last week a second dose has been offered to the 12-15 age group, but from a health perspective it's not really recommended.  The booster is offered to the 18+ group, but not recommended for those under 45.  At the same time politicians have eased quarantine rules to those taking those unnecessary does, so go figure...  There is a conflict here in that the risk of taking the vaccine is larger for the youngest age groups than the disease itself, but that has been disregarded for the sake of limiting the spread of the virus to protect those who are at higher risk of getting seriously ill.  And further justified by that there is much we don't know about "long covid" pulling the former into doubt (which arguably is as speculative as autoimmunity concerns from the vaccines).  We now know that containing the spread strategy has failed, so I think it's safe to say that there has been much unnecessary vaccination.  To me it now seems particularly wasteful for children to get vaccinated, as it is an outdated vaccine which could even disqualify them from getting an updated vaccine in the near future.
This is why I have had the two doses but not the booster yet.  I've heard a lot of reports from friends of side effects that I just don't want to deal with.  Plus it'll be outdated soon anyway.
 
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

10 Feb 2022 02:33

I had a chat with an Australian person who told me that three members of their family have suffered myocardial side effects from the vaccine and when they went to their GP, they were informed that they are packed with people who have shown side effects to their heart from the vaccine?  Could this be true? We do not hear much about this from the media here.
I think there has been a fair degree of openness about that here from health authorities who have been reluctant to offer vaccines to the youngest age groups for this reason, and at the same time have been under much pressure to offer the vaccines.  Last week a second dose has been offered to the 12-15 age group, but from a health perspective it's not really recommended.  The booster is offered to the 18+ group, but not recommended for those under 45.  At the same time politicians have eased quarantine rules to those taking those unnecessary does, so go figure...  There is a conflict here in that the risk of taking the vaccine is larger for the youngest age groups than the disease itself, but that has been disregarded for the sake of limiting the spread of the virus to protect those who are at higher risk of getting seriously ill.  And further justified by that there is much we don't know about "long covid" pulling the former into doubt (which arguably is as speculative as autoimmunity concerns from the vaccines).  We now know that containing the spread strategy has failed, so I think it's safe to say that there has been much unnecessary vaccination.  To me it now seems particularly wasteful for children to get vaccinated, as it is an outdated vaccine which could even disqualify them from getting an updated vaccine in the near future.
This is why I have had the two doses but not the booster yet.  I've heard a lot of reports from friends of side effects that I just don't want to deal with.  Plus it'll be outdated soon anyway.
I'm 20 and I plan to get a booster, but I haven't heard about any negative effects from my friends.
 
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

26 Feb 2022 22:59

Two great papers right here definitely linking the virus to Wuhan wet markets....yet another reason why wet markets and factory farming need to end for both moral and health reasons

 
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

27 Feb 2022 12:09

I'm 20 and I plan to get a booster, but I haven't heard about any negative effects from my friends
Well, one apparent negative effect is that it does not work as intended.  Over here Omicron has pretty much burned its way through the population and starting to fizzle out, and judging from what I see amongst friends and family, the booster makes no significant impact.  Nor does previous infection width Delta.  I'm also noting that the ill effects of the booster is for most people comparable to Omicron itself, the general fatigue, but there definitely is a much higher percentage, though not high, who experience fairly ill effects of Omicron than those experiencing fairly ill effects of the booster.  So, had the booster worked, there would be a reason to get it.  An interesting question is whether we can thank the vaccines for the mild course of Omicron.  I think it's too tempting to conclude that.  The official view is that the vaccines has made the impact of Omicron relatively small, but since so much faith has been put in the vaccines, I suspect there is much wishful thinking and denial going on here.  Yes, relatively more vaccinated people get hospitalised, but this is hardly a proper control group.  These numbers need to be corrected to account for that we don't know whether those opting not to get the vaccine (either by own will or medical advice) are equally dispose to get worse hit by Omicron than those who chose to get the vaccines.
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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

01 Mar 2022 01:18



I was reading this, it's from a virologist, China didn't want to close these animal markets but these studies showed what happened and how this disgusting animal trade caused both SARS 1 and SARS 2.
 
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Re: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Thread

29 Sep 2022 00:39

Any Canadians here or anyone with insight into Canadian politics?  I'm wondering how reopening talks go in Canada and how realistic it is for non-citizen youths to enter Canada in late January.  Whether further reopening is discussed at all.  Currently, two vaccine doses regardless of recoveries are required to enter freely, which is problematic for youths over here.  Most youths have had covid at least once and for these to get two doses is not recommended in this country.  It seems that Canada is pretty alone in this kind of policy now.

EDIT: Canada to remove COVID-19 border and travel measures effective October 1.
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