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midtskogen
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Astrophotography

29 Nov 2021 00:16

 what did it look like as far as what you could actually see with your eyes?
I used video from one of our meteor cameras, I wasn't even there, if I had been there, it would look like pretty regular aurora but it was more popping up here and there than a continuous display, so the stack doesn't get too washed out and it looks a bit like something that actually could happen if the sky really exploded in aurora (perhaps a bit over the top, but not too far from something that could possibly happen).
what do you use to stack videos? I assume you extract the individual frames?
I decode the video frame by frame and for every pixel in a certain position I store the one which has been the brightest in that position.  And finally some simple post processing to reduce noise.  In all about 18,000 frames (20 minutes, 15 frames per second).
the little streaks that are visible embedded in the display, are those meteors?
No, star trails.  This is like a 20 minute exposure, but because no single exposure is more than 1/15th second, I avoid overexposure.
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A-L-E-X
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Astrophotography

29 Nov 2021 16:20

 what did it look like as far as what you could actually see with your eyes?
I used video from one of our meteor cameras, I wasn't even there, if I had been there, it would look like pretty regular aurora but it was more popping up here and there than a continuous display, so the stack doesn't get too washed out and it looks a bit like something that actually could happen if the sky really exploded in aurora (perhaps a bit over the top, but not too far from something that could possibly happen).
what do you use to stack videos? I assume you extract the individual frames?
I decode the video frame by frame and for every pixel in a certain position I store the one which has been the brightest in that position.  And finally some simple post processing to reduce noise.  In all about 18,000 frames (20 minutes, 15 frames per second).
the little streaks that are visible embedded in the display, are those meteors?
No, star trails.  This is like a 20 minute exposure, but because no single exposure is more than 1/15th second, I avoid overexposure.
oh wow so you did that by hand rather than using a program like Registax.  I think Sequator has an option like the one you mentioned it is called "best pixel".  Very well done, it almost seems like movement can be seen even though it is a combined still.  Almost like fireworks going off at the same time in different parts of the sky.
 
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midtskogen
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Astrophotography

30 Nov 2021 01:38

oh wow so you did that by hand rather than using a program like Registax. 
Well, "by hand" would then mean writing a C program doing the work.  I've never tried Registax and I don't know how well it would do for this task.
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Cantra
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Astrophotography

13 Feb 2022 16:47

I wonder how astrophotography would work from say, Ganymede or Callisto.
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Watsisname
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Re: Astrophotography

04 Sep 2022 08:26

Another excellent aurora show this morning! Very bright pulsing greens this time, with a few red and purple pillars mixed in. The show wasn't sparked by a solar eruption this time, but just an unusually long lasting high speed solar wind stream. Space weather prediction center or spaceweather.com for more details.

Image

Image
 
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midtskogen
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Re: Astrophotography

06 Sep 2022 10:43

Looks like quite a bit of aurora activity lately.  I captured this "double" aurora last night (video):
x.jpg
Seen from Gaustatoppen, southern Norway 2022-09-06.  On the left, towards the north, we see the aurora borealis or northern lights.  On the right, towards the northeast, we see the literal aurora, the dawn.
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Watsisname
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Re: Astrophotography

06 Sep 2022 11:23

Nice real-time video. It was a surprisingly good and long-lasting show. Looks like every time zone potentially had a view, and I've seen photos from people as far south as Lithuania, and Oregon along the Columbia River. Excited to see what will come next as we get further into this active solar cycle.

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