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The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 01 Jan 2019 23:57
by A-L-E-X
Wow, I can actually picture that, Wat!  So the smaller black holes become lethal much more quickly because of the more rapid changes that occur in their interior.  So basically if you were to model a black hole solely using a gravity graph of space-time, the smaller black holes have a much shorter and more steep dive into the singularity while the larger ones slope more gently downwards, until they all get near the singularity of course.  Inside the larger black holes, like the huge one you mentioned where you get 18 hours of time before getting near the singularity, you dont notice anything different then from a regular space journey, except that everything is dark around you?  The passage of time and everything else occurs just like it would anywhere else?

Wat, that Kerr journey through a black hole is truly psychedelic!  I wonder if SE will be able to model that at some point in the future for spinnintg or charged black holes, or black holes that are both spinning AND charged!  

Hamilton's site is EXCELLENT and I see he mentioned the waterfall analogy as well as why gravity becomes repulsive near the singularity in both charged and spinning black holes and the analogy to the centrifugal force.
I saw the Penrose diagrams of the journey all the way through and it even contains some terminology I previously used (like an antiverse!)

https://jila.colorado.edu/~ajsh/insideb ... se.html#rn

https://jila.colorado.edu/~ajsh/insidebh/rn.html

Do you find it interesting how all the things we formerly considered to be "fixed" all conspire to change in order to make sure that the speed of light in a vacuum can never seem different to any observer, no matter their perspective?  I wonder if humanity will ever be able to harness enough energy to "break" this physics one day even for a split second, and what its consequences might be?

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 06 Apr 2019 06:03
by LBV 2012-26
I remember that the heaviest black hole discovered so far is not TON 618, it should be SDSS J140821.67+025733.2, its mass gundam 1.96 × 10^11 M⊙.

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 23 Mar 2020 06:38
by thenginer
amazing !

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 05 Jun 2020 01:27
by Bordersun
And if we do, will there be an identical star to it on the other side of the universe

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 21 Mar 2021 01:41
by Khorrah
Short answer, if you were here to know the most massive black hole discovered at the moment it's called "TON-618" with 66 Billions times the mass of our Sun.

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 12 Apr 2021 04:29
by Challenger
This is an amazing value! Compared to this black hole, even our Sun looks like a microbe, and the Earth is even smaller. The longer we explore space, the more startling facts we will learn. It is a pity that there is not enough time to learn everything interesting.

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 14 Jun 2021 13:29
by longname
DoctorOfSpace wrote:
SE will probably look more like these than interstellar in the near future after EHT publishes the paper and data they are working on

Image
Image

Bang on the money

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 08 Jul 2021 12:25
by longname
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Inside the larger black holes, like the huge one you mentioned where you get 18 hours of time before getting near the singularity, you dont notice anything different then from a regular space journey, except that everything is dark around you?  The passage of time and everything else occurs just like it would anywhere else?

The interiors of black holes are NOT DARK, and Space Engine portrays them in a completely dumb way. Light falling from above still hits you, and the Universe ages and dies as you cross the event horizon. Obviously your past light cone still receives light from the past, so you don't see that happen. Not only that, you also can't even get to the singularity before the inner horizon's mass inflation instability vaporizes you.
Sorry, Space Engine's mathematically accurate misconceptions peeve me off :(

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 11 Jul 2021 02:49
by A-L-E-X
longname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Inside the larger black holes, like the huge one you mentioned where you get 18 hours of time before getting near the singularity, you dont notice anything different then from a regular space journey, except that everything is dark around you?  The passage of time and everything else occurs just like it would anywhere else?

The interiors of black holes are NOT DARK, and Space Engine portrays them in a completely dumb way. Light falling from above still hits you, and the Universe ages and dies as you cross the event horizon. Obviously your past light cone still receives light from the past, so you don't see that happen. Not only that, you also can't even get to the singularity before the inner horizon's mass inflation instability vaporizes you.
Sorry, Space Engine's mathematically accurate misconceptions peeve me off :(

You're right, I much rather wish they were like the Penrose diagrams you linked to earlier.  I'm really excited about this update coming at some point, I wonder how long down the road that would be for us to have Kerr black holes like in the videos you posted?

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 11 Jul 2021 04:16
by longname
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I wonder how long down the road that would be for us to have Kerr black holes like in the videos you posted?

Probably never. SE would need a total rewrite to handle any sort of relativity or relativistic effects beyond increasing object masses near C and distorting the view in accordance to relativistic beaming.

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 11 Jul 2021 16:15
by A-L-E-X
longname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I wonder how long down the road that would be for us to have Kerr black holes like in the videos you posted?

Probably never. SE would need a total rewrite to handle any sort of relativity or relativistic effects beyond increasing object masses near C and distorting the view in accordance to relativistic beaming.

But what about those images Vlad posted from the interior of Kerr black holes showing the grid lines and the two horizons- do you think that's a possibility within the following year at least?

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 12 Jul 2021 01:35
by longname
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post But what about those images Vlad posted from the interior of Kerr black holes showing the grid lines and the two horizons- do you think that's a possibility within the following year at least?

When did Vlad show Kerr interiors?

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 12 Jul 2021 04:21
by A-L-E-X
longname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post But what about those images Vlad posted from the interior of Kerr black holes showing the grid lines and the two horizons- do you think that's a possibility within the following year at least?

When did Vlad show Kerr interiors?

Figured he was working on Kerr interiors too since he made the post on this page about Kerr black holes:
viewtopic.php?f=7&t=675&p=36807#p36807

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 12 Jul 2021 05:04
by longname
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Figured he was working on Kerr interiors too since he made the post on this page about Kerr black holes:

I didn't see any correlations, it just seemed somewhat relevant. Either way, trajectories in SE are completely Euclidean and Kerr interiors would be extremely difficult to implement.

The most massive black holes in the Universe

Posted: 12 Jul 2021 17:15
by A-L-E-X
longname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Figured he was working on Kerr interiors too since he made the post on this page about Kerr black holes:

I didn't see any correlations, it just seemed somewhat relevant. Either way, trajectories in SE are completely Euclidean and Kerr interiors would be extremely difficult to implement.

I wonder how much computational power would be needed?  It would be ironic if we'd need quantum computers to model relativity, and by then we'd be onto a workable theory of quantum gravity which would replace relativity at the "singularity" and truly reveal what it was.....and then what would we need to model quantum gravity?