Ultimate space simulation software

 
A-L-E-X
Galaxy Architect
Galaxy Architect
Posts: 3155
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

30 Oct 2020 07:34

Zebra Zed wrote:
I do use another astronomy software. That is Universe Sandbox.

How is the latest version of that for updating real exoplanets (how many does it have) and how do planetary surfaces and atmospheres look using it?
 
User avatar
Zebra Zed
Observer
Observer
Posts: 17
Joined: 22 Oct 2020
Location: Bournemouth, UK

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

14 Dec 2020 02:05

I don't know.
 
Happy_10
Observer
Observer
Posts: 1
Joined: 05 Feb 2021

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

12 Feb 2021 02:02

SpaceEngine (stylized as "Space Engine") is a 3D astronomy program and game engine developed by Russian astronomer and programmer Vladimir Romanyuk. It creates a three-dimensional planetarium representing the entire universe from a combination of real astronomical data and scientifically-accurate procedural generation algorithms. Users can travel through space in any direction or speed, and forwards or backward in time SpaceEngine is in beta status and is currently freeware for Microsoft Windows. SpaceEngine's latest release, version 0.990 beta, is the first paid edition (released on Steam).
Impression of Planet Proxima Centauri with New the stars, Centauri a and Centauri B - Information about  Proxima Centauri .

 
 
User avatar
longname
Explorer
Explorer
Posts: 291
Joined: 13 Apr 2017
Location: ∞/The Multiverse/The Universe/Local Cluster/The Milky Way/Orion Arm/Sol System/Earth-Moon/Earth/UK

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

12 Feb 2021 13:21

Happy_10 wrote:
SpaceEngine (stylized as "Space Engine") is a 3D astronomy program and game engine developed by Russian astronomer and programmer Vladimir Romanyuk. It creates a three-dimensional planetarium representing the entire universe from a combination of real astronomical data and scientifically-accurate procedural generation algorithms. Users can travel through space in any direction or speed, and forwards or backward in time SpaceEngine is in beta status and is currently freeware for Microsoft Windows. SpaceEngine's latest release, version 0.990 beta, is the first paid edition (released on Steam).
Impression of Planet Proxima Centauri with New the stars, Centauri a and Centauri B - Information about  Proxima Centauri .

 

Cheers, didn't know that. The more you know!
[dah<500,26>dah<180,14>dah<180,21>dah<500,19>dah<180,26>dah<500,21>]
 
GodrikUnderscore
Observer
Observer
Posts: 9
Joined: 06 Aug 2021

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

06 Aug 2021 14:25

Sweet!
 
Explorer
Observer
Observer
Posts: 2
Joined: 17 Nov 2021

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

17 Nov 2021 09:25

Field of View
In Space Engine's planetarium viewport, does "field of view" refer to the horizontal, vertical, or some other field of view measured in degrees?
 
Mr. Abner
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 611
Joined: 08 Jun 2017
Location: Mississauga

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

18 Nov 2021 12:02

Explorer wrote:
Field of View
In Space Engine's planetarium viewport, does "field of view" refer to the horizontal, vertical, or some other field of view measured in degrees?

Well, when I call up a ship and turn on one of the HUD modes, the vertical pitch ladder shows 15 degrees above and below the horizon mark. And then there is about another seven degrees between the top of the pitch ladder and the top of the screen, as well as on the bottom. That adds up to some 44 degrees. My FoV was set at the default 45 degrees at the time, so I would say that parameter measures vertical field of view. I would imagine horizontal field of view would be determined by your monitor's aspect ratio.
 
A-L-E-X
Galaxy Architect
Galaxy Architect
Posts: 3155
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

18 Nov 2021 22:21

Thats why I love the 4:3 aspect ratio both for monitors and camera sensors, it's easy to calculate all FOV because all you need to know is that it's a 3-4-5 right triangle so VFOV=3, HFOV=4, DFOV=5
 
Mr. Abner
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 611
Joined: 08 Jun 2017
Location: Mississauga

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

19 Nov 2021 11:05

A-L-E-X wrote:
Thats why I love the 4:3 aspect ratio both for monitors and camera sensors, it's easy to calculate all FOV because all you need to know is that it's a 3-4-5 right triangle so VFOV=3, HFOV=4, DFOV=5

Sure, if you need that information. But that still doesn't answer Explorer's question, now, does it? ;)
 
Explorer
Observer
Observer
Posts: 2
Joined: 17 Nov 2021

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

19 Nov 2021 11:58

Thanks Mr.Abner, helps to have another point of view.  I did a similar test by comparing a planet's "apparent size" to the viewport FOV measurement.  A planet's apparent size of 20° matches the view top to bottom when the FOV is set to 20°.  So, the viewport is showing vertical field of view. The horizontal FOV can be calculated as a ratio of the display resolution, for anyone interested.  In my case, 20°x3840/2054 = 37.39°
 
Mr. Abner
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 611
Joined: 08 Jun 2017
Location: Mississauga

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

20 Nov 2021 01:12

Perhaps that's a good idea for another setting in Space Engine — ability to display/adjust FoV as a vertical or horizontal measurement.
 
A-L-E-X
Galaxy Architect
Galaxy Architect
Posts: 3155
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

20 Nov 2021 02:43

Mr. Abner wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Thats why I love the 4:3 aspect ratio both for monitors and camera sensors, it's easy to calculate all FOV because all you need to know is that it's a 3-4-5 right triangle so VFOV=3, HFOV=4, DFOV=5

Sure, if you need that information. But that still doesn't answer Explorer's question, now, does it? ;)

Yep lol, I've just always been interested in it since I want to "fill the frame" with my moon shots and doing FOV calculations for a given focal length are tricky because they involve crop factor and which aspect of the FOV you're talking about.  Pro photographers like their diagonal FOV, but I contend for astrophotography we should ALWAYS use vertical FOV since that represents the sharpest cut off and I absolutely hate having the top and bottom part of my moon shots chopped off, so 2000mm EFL is ideal (357mm on my Nikon P900.)
You know what would solve all this?  Circular camera sensors and circular windows in universe simulators-- that would be like looking at space through a telescope and the FOV would be the same no matter how you calculated it.
 
A-L-E-X
Galaxy Architect
Galaxy Architect
Posts: 3155
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

20 Nov 2021 02:46

Mr. Abner wrote:
Perhaps that's a good idea for another setting in Space Engine — ability to display/adjust FoV as a vertical or horizontal measurement.

Perhaps it would be even better if we could make the program display the window circularly so there would be no need for a vertical or horizontal measurement and it would be like looking at space through a telescope.
 
A-L-E-X
Galaxy Architect
Galaxy Architect
Posts: 3155
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

20 Nov 2021 03:22

Explorer wrote:
Thanks Mr.Abner, helps to have another point of view.  I did a similar test by comparing a planet's "apparent size" to the viewport FOV measurement.  A planet's apparent size of 20° matches the view top to bottom when the FOV is set to 20°.  So, the viewport is showing vertical field of view. The horizontal FOV can be calculated as a ratio of the display resolution, for anyone interested.  In my case, 20°x3840/2054 = 37.39°

Then they are doing exactly as I suggested when I said astrophotographers should ALWAYS use vertical FOV because that represents the sharpest cut off.
 
Mr. Abner
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 611
Joined: 08 Jun 2017
Location: Mississauga

SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

20 Nov 2021 10:04

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post... we should ALWAYS use vertical FOV since that represents the sharpest cut off...

That again depends on the orientation of your picture, sensor, or display.  I frequently use my computer's main monitor in portrait mode. (When I first started with S.E, I would always run it in portrait mode.) If you take a picture in portrait mode, you would want that FoV value for the horizontal axis.

But I know what you mean — FoV should always be the smallest axis. (I believe S.E. always used the vertical axis, even when in portrait mode.)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests