Ultimate space simulation software

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Watsisname
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11 Jan 2017 02:35

midtskogen wrote:
Source of the post It's a bold prediction, which is fine as long as they are prepared to be proven wrong.  The cool thing is that this is something that amateur astronomers can keep an eye on over the next year and possibly collect a lot of useful data.

Quite so.  I've just gotten to reading through their paper and checking their figures, and they actually place a lot of emphasis on alternative models and how further observations can be used to test them.  

For example, one other possibility (possible but unlikely) is that the system orbits with an unseen companion such that the changes in light travel time are -- at least for right now -- mimicking the expected behavior of a binary merger.  It can't stay that way forever though (the merger is an exponential, while the other option is cyclical so can only look like an exponential for a short while), and they make some models to show the evolution in different scenarios:

Image

So further observations are pretty important.  With further time, the "unseen companion" scenario is either verified or made increasingly unlikely because it would take a more precise combination of parameters to mimick a merger.

I think this also emphasizes why it's good to check the papers whenever they're available.  Much more detail and insight that is often glossed over or omitted entirely in the popular articles.
 
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14 Jan 2017 04:29

I've made a small add-on for this system.
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18 Jan 2017 22:17

Maybe Tabby's Star doesn't contain alien mega-structures, but it's just the effect of a planet that have been ate by its parent star.

It makes sense, since that kind of collision would create an high blast of energy with a slow decade (what we're seeing on the luminosity of the star, on an high scale), and would also create an huge number of debris that might be what we've seen passing in front of the star.

I still think that the mega-structure thing is possible, or, at least, I hope so  8-)
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28 Jan 2017 12:20

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
 
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28 Jan 2017 12:32

Motion interpolate was used on 7 images of HR 8799 taken from the Keck Telescope over 7 years to create this image.



That is quite impressive
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Watsisname
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28 Jan 2017 12:36

Freakin' awesome!
 
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Xoran
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05 Feb 2017 03:53

That HR 8799 thing is amazing. Also, why is no one mentioning Proxima Centauri b? There is probably a 90% chance it will be a desert planet or an oceania, but a rocky planet in the habitable zone of a star so close to home is awesome. :)
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06 Feb 2017 17:29

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
 
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06 Feb 2017 23:42

Xoran wrote:
Source of the post Also, why is no one mentioning Proxima Centauri b?

Proxima Centauri b

Proxima b by Cirax (6 versions)
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07 Feb 2017 06:17

JackDole, i knew about that, i was talking about this thread.
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07 Feb 2017 07:48

Xoran wrote:
Source of the post i was talking about this thread.

Perhaps this is because it is no news anymore.
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07 Feb 2017 07:56

Yeah, I'm more interested in this metallic hydrogen  :D
"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
 
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Xoran
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07 Feb 2017 09:43

JackDole wrote:
Source of the post Perhaps this is because it is no news anymore.

It is just insane that a potentially habitable planet is this close to Earth :)
Also, saw something in the news about a star taking 10 years to get eaten by a black hole in a galaxy 1.8 billion light years away, and the normal time it takes a black hole to eat a star is 1 year.
Last edited by Xoran on 07 Feb 2017 09:56, edited 1 time in total.
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Hornblower
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07 Feb 2017 09:55

Xoran, well, the chances are, it's not habitable
"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
 
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07 Feb 2017 16:50

Tornado at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility today
"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
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