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A-L-E-X
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12 Apr 2021 01:47

Watsisname wrote:
PlutonianEmpire wrote:
Source of the post The universe's cosmological structure seems to resemble that of the human brain.

FFT does a nice job explaining the problems of the cosmic web structure acting as a brain, so I like to focus on the idea of them appearing similar. Sometimes very different processes leads to structures that resemble one another, but otherwise bear no relation in behavior or function. Spiral galaxies may remind a lot of whirlpools, for instance. But whirlpools involve water being sucked down toward a drain. So are galaxies slowly draining down into their centers? No. (One might ask if their central black holes could act like the drain, and they do, but only for the material that is extremely close to them within an accretion disk. The rest of the galaxy is in orbital motion and isn't being "sucked in".)

The cosmic web looks similar to the structure of neurons, which is an interesting case where the gravitational collapse of a fluid happens to produce similar structure as that which optimizes the connections within a brain. But as FFT says there is no meaningful signal processing happening along these filaments of the cosmic web that could be construed as thoughts. Light is very slow, and a more serious problem is unlike in brains, changes in one supercluster don't significantly influence other superclusters, especially ones very far away. Brains involve rapid and organized communication and feedback between distant parts of itself, and these features are lacking in the universe.

Wat, could it be that similar structures are due to being acted on by the same forces?  Like gravity and/or the electromagnetic force?  Both are long range forces that decrease proportionately with distance squared.
On a different note, some of the quantum mind theories are interesting too, but I believe similar arguments have been used against Orch-OR.

I believe the distances between planets which was described by Titus-Bode and which we've now found exists in exoplanetary systems too, is also due to certain gravitational resonances making planets more likely to be placed at certain distances from their parent star.
 
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12 Apr 2021 02:00

https://phys.org/news/2020-11-human-bra ... verse.html

Nice that people have done scientific studies on this across a wide range of fields, an argument I use against specialization and a more wholistic connected approach to science.

The encouraging results of this pilot study are prompting the researchers to think that new and effective analysis techniques in both fields, cosmology, and neurosurgery, will allow for a better understanding of the routed dynamics underlying the temporal evolution of these two systems.
Last edited by A-L-E-X on 12 Apr 2021 02:04, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Watsisname
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12 Apr 2021 02:00

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Wat, could it be that similar structures are due to being acted on by the same forces?  Like gravity and/or the electromagnetic force?  Both are long range forces that decrease proportionately with distance squared.

The closest I can think of are filaments of plasma in certain discharges, but even then it's rare to really get something very similar to the cosmic web or neurons. Besides that it's not common to see structures like this forming electromagnetically, because there are positive and negative electric charges, whereas mass always attracts. Electromagnetism is also much stronger, so the individual particles partnered up very quickly in the young universe, whereas the formation of structures due to gravity is an ongoing process, on scales both large and small. :)
 
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12 Apr 2021 02:08

Watsisname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Wat, could it be that similar structures are due to being acted on by the same forces?  Like gravity and/or the electromagnetic force?  Both are long range forces that decrease proportionately with distance squared.

The closest I can think of are filaments of plasma in certain discharges, but even then it's rare to really get something very similar to the cosmic web or neurons. Besides that it's not common to see structures like this forming electromagnetically, because there are positive and negative electric charges, whereas mass always attracts. Electromagnetism is also much stronger, so the individual particles partnered up very quickly in the young universe, whereas the formation of structures due to gravity is an ongoing process, on scales both large and small. :)

Oh, I remember when you took beautiful images of these discharges!  Hmm that does make it seem strange that they would be similar.  Did you read the above study?  It was just a pilot study, but the findings were interesting.
I was thinking also of how the structure of the atom (Bohr model) matches up with the solar system, but we know now of course the Bohr model isn't quite accurate  but still the idea of (-) charge electrons orbiting around (+) charge protons does make one wonder about how forces that behave differently can sometimes result in similar structures.

This is pretty interesting stuff from the study:

The human brain functions thanks to its wide neuronal network that is deemed to contain approximately 69 billion neurons. On the other hand, the observable universe is composed of a cosmic web of at least 100 billion galaxies. Within both systems, only 30% of their masses are composed of galaxies and neurons. Within both systems, galaxies and neurons arrange themselves in long filaments or nodes between the filaments. Finally, within both systems, 70% of the distribution of mass or energy is composed of components playing an apparently passive role: water in the brain and dark energy in the observable Universe.

"We calculated the spectral density of both systems. This is a technique often employed in cosmology for studying the spatial distribution of galaxies," explains Franco Vazza. "Our analysis showed that the distribution of the fluctuation within the cerebellum neuronal network on a scale from 1 micrometer to 0.1 millimeters follows the same progression of the distribution of matter in the cosmic web but, of course, on a larger scale that goes from 5 million to 500 million light-years."


The two researchers also calculated some parameters characterizing both the neuronal network and the cosmic web: the average number of connections in each node and the tendency of clustering several connections in relevant central nodes within the network. "Once again, structural parameters have identified unexpected agreement levels. Probably, the connectivity within the two networks evolves following similar physical principles, despite the striking and obvious difference between the physical powers regulating galaxies and neurons," adds Alberto Feletti. "These two complex networks show more similarities than those shared between the cosmic web and a galaxy or a neuronal network and the inside of a neuronal body."
 
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23 Apr 2021 07:58

What do we know about the red giant phase of stellar evolution? Is there more than one branch of RG evolution (I know theres different death types, but I'm refering to just the RG phases)? Do all RG's lives end when they reach spectral class M9.9; or do some die at, say, M5.3?

As for Sol, do we know exactly what RG path it might travel before shedding it's layers? How big might the new Habitable Zones get for Sol? How deep into the M spectral class it might get?
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20 May 2021 14:41

I can't remember if we've discussed it here before many years ago, as this is a science fiction vision I've had for quite some time:

Cars will be electric and charged by induction on highways.  Car batteries can be relatively small and light, sufficient to keep the car going on the smaller roads.  So there will be no need to stop for charging during long distance driving.  This infrastructure also forms a part of the distribution network of electric power and to some degree replaces the large masts.  Whether this is at all practical, I have no idea.  Has anyone done the maths?  Maybe there will be large energy losses, but in the same science fiction future maybe we have abundant fusion power and/or cheap superconductors at balmy temperatures.
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A-L-E-X
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21 May 2021 03:48

I have another idea.  How fa away are we from hover cars?  It occurs to me if we have the above, we should also be able to use magnetic fields to allow cars to move three dimensionally.  It would be incredible if we could progress that far in our lifetimes.
 
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21 May 2021 11:07

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post  How fa away are we from hover cars?

If the cars are locked to magnetic tracks, it's really a train, isn't it?  And in a future like that personal cars have become obsolete.
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A-L-E-X
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21 May 2021 16:51

midtskogen wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post  How fa away are we from hover cars?

If the cars are locked to magnetic tracks, it's really a train, isn't it?  And in a future like that personal cars have become obsolete.

No not magnetic tracks.....magnetic fields that raise cars above the ground.
 
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midtskogen
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22 May 2021 08:36

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post No not magnetic tracks.....magnetic fields that raise cars above the ground.

And how is steering, breaking and accelleration supposed to work?
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A-L-E-X
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23 May 2021 01:17

midtskogen wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post No not magnetic tracks.....magnetic fields that raise cars above the ground.

And how is steering, breaking and accelleration supposed to work?

https://www.goudsmit.co.uk/maglev-cars- ... r-reality/
Magnetic levitation
 
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23 May 2021 09:09

How is that not a track?
 
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midtskogen
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23 May 2021 10:23

A-L-E-X wrote:
midtskogen wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post No not magnetic tracks.....magnetic fields that raise cars above the ground.

And how is steering, breaking and accelleration supposed to work?

https://www.goudsmit.co.uk/maglev-cars- ... r-reality/
Magnetic levitation

I mean, how is it supposed to work in the real world, to be distinguished from fantasy.  "Reacts with underground minerals".  That's pretty weak, even for science fiction.
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A-L-E-X
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23 May 2021 11:08

you'll love this, granted I would be surprised if this becomes reality before 2050 lol.

https://www.mepits.com/project/223/tech ... -the-world

https://www.automoblog.net/2012/10/06/m ... 0on%20cars.

cost seems to be the main issue, also when you make roads magnetized they may no longer be suitable for conventional vehicles.
 
A-L-E-X
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23 May 2021 11:12

Mr. Abner wrote:
How is that not a track?

well the road is the track as per the above article.  you'll need to magnetize all the roads and then it'll work (but perhaps not for conventional vehicles)

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