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A-L-E-X
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16 Dec 2021 23:19

Hey Wat or anyone who can help with this....I heard two interesting stories tonight, maybe you can elaborate on both of these.

They both seem pretty interesting to me.

https://twitter.com/i/events/1470848067670724611

The Antarctic is signaling big climate trouble

The sea is releasing ancient carbon dioxide and vast ice shelves are melting from below. See why new research has experts increasingly worried.
Video via @JessePesta

[font=Inter, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, Segoe UI, Roboto, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif, Apple Color Emoji, Segoe UI Emoji, Segoe UI Symbol]wow 3-5 years from now looks like a huge glacier on Antarctica is going to melt and when it does sea level will rise by FEET that and organic molecules found in a crater on Mars I think our new planet is calling[/font]
 
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midtskogen
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17 Dec 2021 00:00

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post The Antarctic is signaling big climate trouble

I find such articles where you have to do endless scrolling just to read the next sentence pretty annoying, especially when the authors don't get to the point and back up the headline.  They only linked to a paper saying the opposite. I tried to look up some of the names mentioned at scholar.google.com, but struggle to find anything that looks similar to the headline.  One paper that I found, explains the climate link, but also argues that the observed trend seems to be larger CO2 uptake rather than release.

These matters are complex, and the opposite cannot be ruled out, and at first glance this looks like journalism that focuses on what can't be ruled out in science taken to the extreme to create a catchy story.  That's science fiction, not science fact.

On a general note, we live on a dynamic planet where little is static.  Change is the normal.  Not all changes, but identifying the changes that signals "big trouble" is not trivial.
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A-L-E-X
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17 Dec 2021 00:23

midtskogen wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post The Antarctic is signaling big climate trouble

I find such articles where you have to do endless scrolling just to read the next sentence pretty annoying, especially when the authors don't get to the point and back up the headline.  They only linked to a paper saying the opposite. I tried to look up some of the names mentioned at scholar.google.com, but struggle to find anything that looks similar to the headline.  One paper that I found, explains the climate link, but also argues that the observed trend seems to be larger CO2 uptake rather than release.

These matters are complex, and the opposite cannot be ruled out, and at first glance this looks like journalism that focuses on what can't be ruled out in science taken to the extreme to create a catchy story.  That's science fiction, not science fact.

On a general note, we live on a dynamic planet where little is static.  Change is the normal.  Not all changes, but identifying the changes that signals "big trouble" is not trivial.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/202 ... tw-nytimes
Can you read this, I can't it's behind a paywall for me.  But this has been over all news networks today, they are referring to a huge ice shelf that is melting  (and may be gone in a short enough time frame that we will find out  if the projected feet rise of sea level will actually happen.)

https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate- ... ntarctica/

I can actually read this one lol
 
Mr. Abner
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26 Dec 2021 12:36

 
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midtskogen
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26 Dec 2021 14:13

So far, so good, but still a lot of things that have to go right.
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A-L-E-X
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27 Dec 2021 05:39

Yes and how long will both Hubble and James Webb coexist?  Hubble has some life left in it?
 
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midtskogen
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31 Dec 2021 11:37

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post how long will both Hubble and James Webb coexist?  Hubble has some life left in it?

Check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjW4qKn0aNo
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A-L-E-X
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12 Jan 2022 23:34

Thanks, I just saw the video....for some reason I didn't get a notification for this thread!

Also.... here is a potato shaped planet that was just discovered, how soon before it is in the program?

https://twitter.com/i/events/1481343058759368704

[size=150][font=TwitterChirp, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, Segoe UI, Roboto, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]A “potato-shaped” planet has been discovered[/font][/size]

[font=TwitterChirp, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, Segoe UI, Roboto, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif][size=100][font=TwitterChirp, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, Segoe UI, Roboto, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]Astronomers have discovered a planet, WASP-103b, more like a potato than a globe. It formed around a star that is one-and-a-half times larger than Jupiter.[/font]
[font=TwitterChirp, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, Segoe UI, Roboto, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]Photo via @ESA_CHEOPS[/font][/font]
[/size]

A planet has been discovered, dubbed WASP-103b, and one of the latest non-globe planets recorded. Due to its proximity to its home star - less than 20,000 miles - tidal stresses pull it into the shape of a potato.
 
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Watsisname
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15 Jan 2022 01:53

A dramatic volcanic eruption at Mt. Hunga Tonga - Hunga Ha'apai on Tonga a few hours ago. The shockwave can be seen spreading through the atmosphere from satellite imagery!

Image 
 
A-L-E-X
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15 Jan 2022 02:12

Watsisname wrote:
A dramatic volcanic eruption at Mt. Hunga Tonga - Hunga Ha'apai on Tonga a few hours ago. The shockwave can be seen spreading through the atmosphere from satellite imagery!

Image 

I saw the videos of the tsunami that rolled into Tonga- almost 2 meters high!  How frightening!
 
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Watsisname
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15 Jan 2022 06:12

This is incredible. If you look closely in satellite imagery you can still see the effect of the pressure wave moving through the atmosphere, even as far as the west coast of the US, more than 8000km away. To help make it more visible, I used "grain extract" layer blending in GIMP to emphasize pixels that change between frames. (The white crescent sweeping from right to left is Earth's terminator.)

Image

I calculated that the wave speed is slightly slower than the speed of sound at sea level. About 300 m/s instead of 340 m/s. This might make sense if we think of the speed of sound averaged through the lower atmosphere. As you go up in altitude, the temperature is colder, and the sound speed is slower.

As I watched the wave approach by satellite imagery I wondered if I could notice it as it passed by. I didn't think I would be able to. I went out about 10 minutes before it was due to arrive, and there were patches of fog over the water and a mid-level layer of broken clouds. Sure enough, as the wave passed, the fog slowly evaporated for a few minutes, and then reformed. The mid-level clouds also shifted.

It was all so subtle that you'd never notice or think twice about it if you did not know to look for it. But it definitely happened. It was exactly like how clouds behave in footage of nuclear explosions when the shockwave passes through them, just slower. It was extremely weird. I'm still kind of stunned by it. I never expected to see such a thing in my life, especially from an eruption so far away.


There was no sound at all, of course. The "wavelength" is far too long.
 
Mr. Abner
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15 Jan 2022 12:07

That is so frickin' cool.
 
A-L-E-X
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15 Jan 2022 20:40

I heard the tsunami made it to the west coast and Santa Barbara was flooded?!
 
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midtskogen
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16 Jan 2022 23:45

I live 15,600 km away from the eruption.  Still, note the pressure around 18:30 UTC:
x.png


The eruption counts as a 5.8 magnitude quake.  Under ideal conditions I would be able to detect that with my seismometer, but in this case I had too much noise from rough seas in the Norwegian Sea.
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FastFourierTransform
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17 Jan 2022 11:57

Watsisname wrote:
Source of the post It was all so subtle that you'd never notice or think twice about it if you did not know to look for it. But it definitely happened. It was exactly like how clouds behave in footage of nuclear explosions when the shockwave passes through them, just slower. It was extremely weird. I'm still kind of stunned by it. I never expected to see such a thing in my life, especially from an eruption so far away.

What a beautiful experience. Those are the things that make life something wonderful. Perceiving your surroundings change due to a cataclysmic event far away and knowing how the chain of events connect each element just to release such a subtle hint, most be an amazing feeling.


It appears that the antipodes of Tonga are located in the south of Algeria (close to Mali):

Image
I don't know if there are any known public seismometers in the region but it would be nice to take a look at them if they exist, since antipodal focusing of seismic waves is a thing worth looking at.

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