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midtskogen
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10 Nov 2021 02:48

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post But in that case the effect is the reverse, as the smaller creature lasts longer.

As Wats points out, the effect of the resistance differs (due to different surface/mass ratio) and lower speed is bad for a planet in orbit but good for a creature.

Kurzgesagt uses the mouse and elephant example in a video:D
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10 Nov 2021 23:31

That's interesting....on Nova last night they were showing some examples of exotic exoplanets and they actually showed an example of a couple of planets that were really close to their parent star.....not quite in the atmosphere of the parent star but pretty close.  There was an a Super Earth that was sandwiched between its parent star and a gas giant and experiencing strong tidal effects from both-- so much so that the tidal effects were causing widespread volcanic activity on both sides of the planet (it's tidally bound but since it's sandwiched between the two, it has it on both sides.)

Do you think we have any space telescope going up soon that would be sensitive enough to detect a planet inside its parent star's atmosphere, Wat?  Perhaps the James Webb Telescope?
 
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10 Nov 2021 23:33

midtskogen wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post But in that case the effect is the reverse, as the smaller creature lasts longer.

As Wats points out, the effect of the resistance differs (due to different surface/mass ratio) and lower speed is bad for a planet in orbit but good for a creature.

Kurzgesagt uses the mouse and elephant example in a video:D

It's really interesting  I didn't think a planet could survive for that long, but at the top end being able to exist in the atmosphere of its parent star for a few million years is quite interesting.  I dont think this is modeled in SE; I haven't seen any planet inside the atmosphere of its parent star  (although I've seen a few that look like comets because their atmospheres are being burned away).
 
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Watsisname
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11 Nov 2021 02:02

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Do you think we have any space telescope going up soon that would be sensitive enough to detect a planet inside its parent star's atmosphere, Wat?  Perhaps the James Webb Telescope?

A planet inside its star would not be observed directly. Rather, we would observe the effects (described earlier) on the star. This could be detected by amateur astronomers, if they are lucky enough to find one. The hardest part isn't the detection itself but ruling out other plausible causes for the star's behavior.
 
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11 Nov 2021 07:29

Watsisname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Do you think we have any space telescope going up soon that would be sensitive enough to detect a planet inside its parent star's atmosphere, Wat?  Perhaps the James Webb Telescope?

A planet inside its star would not be observed directly. Rather, we would observe the effects (described earlier) on the star. This could be detected by amateur astronomers, if they are lucky enough to find one. The hardest part isn't the detection itself but ruling out other plausible causes for the star's behavior.

I thought perhaps we could use the transit method the way Kepler used it...I remember one of our posters actually outlined how to do it with a mirrorless or dslr camera and a moderate focal length lens.  (I think he mentioned that a 50mm lens was recommended- though I'm not sure if he meant the objective diameter of the lens or the focal length.)  To rule out other plausible causes, I take it we would need some sort of professional confirmation (could that be provided by spectroscopic analysis of the star or what you mentioned earlier, by measuring its angular momentum and finding the star to be spinning unusually rapidly?)
 
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11 Nov 2021 16:47

Transit method works if the planet passes in front of the star. Not so much if it is inside of the star. :) Stars are opaque (though you can see a little bit of depth into them, hence the limb darkening effect), and a planet inside its star will have a similar surface temperature and hence brightness as the star at that depth. Transits of giant stars are less easy to detect anyway, because the ratio of size of planet to star is smaller, so a smaller fraction of the star's light gets blocked.

To detect a planet that is engulfed, you'd really be looking for a brightening of the star instead of a dimming (and steady rather than briefly once per orbit), because the planet being dragged through the outer layers of the star heats them up. But stars can have variable brightness for many other reasons.
 
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11 Nov 2021 20:06

Yes, which makes it really tricky.  Most stars are variable I think. Measuring the angular momentum, which you outlined before, sounds like a better method even if still indirect, but that can happen for other reasons too.
-------------------------------

https://www.independent.co.uk/space/can ... 55080.html

whats this about monster solar storms on the menu for the next 4 years?
 
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11 Nov 2021 23:46

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post whats this about monster solar storms on the menu for the next 4 years?

Nothing too special, just the 11-year solar cycle doing its thing. I look forward to seeing how the corona looks in the 2024 eclipse. :)

Image

Also, please make an effort to cut down on the amount of multi-posting. There has been a lot of it lately, and it's getting tiring to edit them together.
 
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12 Nov 2021 15:29

Watsisname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post whats this about monster solar storms on the menu for the next 4 years?

Nothing too special, just the 11-year solar cycle doing its thing. I look forward to seeing how the corona looks in the 2024 eclipse. :)

Image

Also, please make an effort to cut down on the amount of multi-posting. There has been a lot of it lately, and it's getting tiring to edit them together.

omg yes!  and sorry about that!  Are you coming here for the April 2024 eclipse?  I'm making plans to see it in upstate NY....I just hope the weather cooperates.  Do you remember in the last American eclipse there were pictures of the total eclipse with pink protuberances clearly visible?  I hope we get to see the same this time!  Is there any particular equipment you recommend? I'm bringing my eclipse glasses and my mirrorless camera and a 75-300 lens.  I was wondering if I should get a special solar filter for the camera lens (58mm filter thread) or use a spare pair of eclipse glasses as a makeshift filter?
 
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17 Nov 2021 19:05

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post  Are you coming here for the April 2024 eclipse?

Currently planning for Texas where the chances of clear skies are greatest (besides in Mexico, but fewer roads and services along the track there). And yes, hard to forget the prominences which were spectacular in the 2017 eclipse. The largest was visible (barely) with the naked eye. Good chance of seeing them again in 2024 -- they're usually seen in every total eclipse, but typically need a little magnification to spot. The pink arc of chromosphere is also stunning, and much easier to see with the unaided eye.


A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Is there any particular equipment you recommend?

Your eyes. :) Anything else is a bonus but which also must be factored for the limited time you have. Totality goes by very fast and it's easy to try to do too much.

Binoculars are nice for a closeup of the Sun during totality, and bring any camera equipment you're comfortable with. In 2017 I used my DSLR with a telephoto lens for the Sun, and GoPro to capture the changing lighting conditions and crowd reaction during and just before/after totality. If you want to get good photos of the corona with your telephoto, be sure to take a lot of shots at very different exposures. The corona spans a very wide range of brightnesses. The corona is also much bigger than you might expect, and too much zoom might mean missing the outer parts of it.

Personally, I don't bother with solar filters. Not because they're not needed outside of totality (they absolutely are), but because I'm less interested in photographing the partial phases, opting instead to observe the surroundings with my eyes and occasionally glancing at the Sun with eclipse glasses.
 
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18 Nov 2021 08:25

Watsisname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post  Are you coming here for the April 2024 eclipse?

Currently planning for Texas where the chances of clear skies are greatest (besides in Mexico, but fewer roads and services along the track there). And yes, hard to forget the prominences which were spectacular in the 2017 eclipse. The largest was visible (barely) with the naked eye. Good chance of seeing them again in 2024 -- they're usually seen in every total eclipse, but typically need a little magnification to spot. The pink arc of chromosphere is also stunning, and much easier to see with the unaided eye.


A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Is there any particular equipment you recommend?

Your eyes. :) Anything else is a bonus but which also must be factored for the limited time you have. Totality goes by very fast and it's easy to try to do too much.

Binoculars are nice for a closeup of the Sun during totality, and bring any camera equipment you're comfortable with. In 2017 I used my DSLR with a telephoto lens for the Sun, and GoPro to capture the changing lighting conditions and crowd reaction during and just before/after totality. If you want to get good photos of the corona with your telephoto, be sure to take a lot of shots at very different exposures. The corona spans a very wide range of brightnesses. The corona is also much bigger than you might expect, and too much zoom might mean missing the outer parts of it.

Personally, I don't bother with solar filters. Not because they're not needed outside of totality (they absolutely are), but because I'm less interested in photographing the partial phases, opting instead to observe the surroundings with my eyes and occasionally glancing at the Sun with eclipse glasses.

Yes, thanks for reminding me Wat :)  Is 75-300 with a 2x crop sensor going to be enough to frame the corona tightly?
I also have 10x50 binoculars, do I need to use protection with that? I guess I can have my eclipse glasses on when I use them!
I want to get the effect of the partial phases of the eclipse reflecting on the ground (like through spaces in the leaves).  I should probably bring a small tripod?  I want to see the pink colors emanating from the sun with the eclipse, I've never seen that before!
Wat, are you going to be up for the near total lunar eclipse tonight?  97% lunar eclipse is going to still give the total eclipse effect right (deep red color on the moon with just the edges of the moon being brighter and whiter?)  I heard it is the longest partial eclipse in a long time and the moon is passing through the thickest part of the earth's shadow, 3 hr 28 min!  I wonder how long the eclipse would've been if it had been total- maybe 4 plus hours?  Is the 75-300 lens also good for the lunar eclipse?  I have a superzoom with 2000mm EFL (Nikon P900) which does some nice pics of Jupiter and Saturn but I think thats too much focal length for a total eclipse on an untracked tripod because a lunar eclipse needs a long shutter speed and at 2000mm EFL, the moon will move out of the frame before the exposure ends?
 
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18 Nov 2021 18:43

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I also have 10x50 binoculars, do I need to use protection with that? I guess I can have my eclipse glasses on when I use them!

I recommend you not use your binoculars on the Sun outside of totality. Unless you have a proper solar filter to put in front of your equipment (not behind it!), then it's a bad idea for both your equipment and your eyes. Magnification and light gathering power and the Sun do not mix. 

Save the binocs for the totality, where it's both safe and spectacular to view the Sun with them. You can watch the progress of the partial phases with just your eclipse glasses, or by projecting an image of the Sun on the ground through a pinhole, or through tree leaves. The deeper parts of the partial phases also give an eerie light, and it's well worth watching the surroundings as much as the Sun at that point.

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Wat, are you going to be up for the near total lunar eclipse tonight?

Unlikely. It's overcast here. 97% partial lunar eclipse should be deep enough to see some of the red/copper color of the umbra, but the remaining sliver will still be fairly bright and might drown the umbral shadow out a bit. It will be easier to see with magnification, or with a camera. Yes, give your camera and zoom lens a try on the Moon. It will give good sense for shooting the Sun during the solar eclipse as well, since it's nearly the same size. And for the corona, imagine it spreading about 2 Sun or Moon diameters away:

Image
 
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18 Nov 2021 23:56

Thanks Wat and great image too!  I'm staying up for max eclipse in less than 3 hours even though it's raining here but the rain is supposed to exit in 2 hours and skies are supposed to quickly clear!  And I read that there are two total lunar eclipses for us next year, in May and November, so this is good practice.

I've been awake all night for the eclipse but it was raining here until 3 am and still cloudy at 4:30 past the maximum point of the eclipse.  The clouds only started to clear about 5 minutes ago (4:40-4:45 am) and the moon is like 25-30 pct lighted in the NW sky about 30 degrees up
 
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19 Nov 2021 03:03

Remember to allow yourself to experience a solar eclipse, and for that you only need your eyes.  If your focus is too much on equipment, you'll miss the best bit.  Don't worry too much about pictures.  Others will make better ones.  Still, going through pictures and videos after the eclipse is fun, too.  My advice is to use equipment that you can automate as much as possible during the eclipse.  You probably still need to remove the filter manually for your camera(s) for totality (and don't forget to put it back on after totality).

Where will I be in 2024?  Too early for me to make plans.  I've seen three totalities.  Wouldn't turn down a fourth if I have a decent chance to see it.  My favourite one is the 2015 eclipse: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_SmaCnHIgU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zNcuA2BHHA
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20 Nov 2021 03:32

I'm thinking like that too, I'm leery of the fact that the longest total solar eclipses are still only 7.5 minutes which is a very short time, so I've come to the conclusion that I should just look with my eyes and use a remote release or even timelapse mode for the camera on a tripod and use a wider focal length so I don't have to look through the camera to make sure the sun is in the field of view.  The 75-300 lens should be fine for that I think?  I dont want to go too wide and lose details either.

I love that video, perhaps I should do that instead (I think my camera has an option to do both at the same time, so I guess I could do that too, but the pictures will be 1080P quality so it might be better just to do the video and extract images from it if I so desire.)

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