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A-L-E-X
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07 May 2019 13:35

Stellarator wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Right now we have a superbug infestation going on in our local hospitals (Candida Albans) that's resistant to all antibiotics and the state is worried people will find out what hospitals have it so they refuse to reveal the info and the media isn't even covering it outside of one station (WABC).

Yes, it is a bit worrisome that there is nary but a mention of this global problem in the news, besides a few online blogs writing about it. I see this as a failure of the journalistic industry. They focus on new outbreaks of, admittedly still dangerous, Ebola half a world away in the Congo, and yet the lethal threat of superbugs invading our hospitals and food is being blithely ignored.

I guess honesty is an overrated trope in the media.

I probably wouldn't even know about it but I keep close track of these things- both my parents passed away from superbug infestations in hospitals.  Our overuse of antibiotics (not just as medication but also their use in farm animals) has really come back to haunt us.
 
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Gnargenox
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12 May 2019 21:21

There's a candidate planet that may be close to confirmation. It's a 1.1±0.1 Earth-radius planet in a 365.4 day orbit around a 0.97 solar-radius sun. If it is confirmed, it would be the _first_ true Earth-analogue.
Discovered by Kepler but no ID yet, maybe will be Kepler-16nn. Located at 2MASS J19432996+5059289

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12 May 2019 23:38

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post There's a candidate planet that may be close to confirmation. It's a 1.1±0.1 Earth-radius planet in a 365.4 day orbit around a 0.97 solar-radius sun. If it is confirmed, it would be the _first_ true Earth-analogue.

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Stellarator
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12 May 2019 23:53

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post There's a candidate planet that may be close to confirmation. It's a 1.1±0.1 Earth-radius planet in a 365.4 day orbit around a 0.97 solar-radius sun. If it is confirmed, it would be the _first_ true Earth-analogue.
Discovered by Kepler but no ID yet, maybe will be Kepler-16nn. Located at 2MASS J19432996+5059289

https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www ... 2aIo8yRDyO

Fingers crossed that they can confirm that it is indeed an actual analog. If so, needless to say it would be one of the closest we've ever got to detecting a Earth-twin exoplanet, and be an absolute must for a atmospheric spectroscopic observation. Despite all that, the chances of it actually bearing life are still slim.

Image
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13 May 2019 00:48

Stellarator wrote:
Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post There's a candidate planet that may be close to confirmation. It's a 1.1±0.1 Earth-radius planet in a 365.4 day orbit around a 0.97 solar-radius sun. If it is confirmed, it would be the _first_ true Earth-analogue.
Discovered by Kepler but no ID yet, maybe will be Kepler-16nn. Located at 2MASS J19432996+5059289

https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www ... 2aIo8yRDyO

Fingers crossed that they can confirm that it is indeed an actual analog. If so, needless to say it would be one of the closest we've ever got to detecting a Earth-twin exoplanet, and be an absolute must for a atmospheric spectroscopic observation. Despite all that, the chances of it actually bearing life are still slim.

Image


What makes you say that it's chances of supporting life are minimal?
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Stellarator
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13 May 2019 03:04

Messier wrote:
Source of the post What makes you say that it's chances of supporting life are minimal?

Perhaps it is my inner pessimist, but even if the planet is the perfect mass, has an atmosphere, and is within the HZ of it's star - that does not automatically mean it will support advanced biological life (by advanced, I don't mean technological, just multicellular). There are a lot of factors that go into life arising on a planetary surface, and while I don't think the environment has to be exactly Earth-like to support abiogenesis, there are still other nuances that are involved in organic life forming which are not purely addressed by the mass and orbital properties of the planet. I do think we can detect life on a exoplanet with the upcoming missions we have planned. However, it would be foolish to say that the exoplanet automatically has life on it because of its similar physical properties to Earth.  Overall, the chances of any one exoplanet having life seem minimal when all factors are taken into consideration.

I would like to make it clear that I am not really talking about the Rare Earth Hypothesis here, but rather talking about the challenges life seems to face as it gains a foothold on a planet.

This discovery of the Earth-analog candidate is really exciting though, and further proof that at least in basic physical properties, Earth is not that rare in the cosmos.
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Gnargenox
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13 May 2019 12:13

The stellar mass 0.981 +0.155/-0.127 Ms given by photometry and orbital period 365.45562 days given in the proposal place the candidate planet at 0.99399 AU. The insolation of the planet can be calculated as: 1.044067 / 0.99399^2, which puts the candidate planet right at where Earth is in terms of radiation. This is shocking, its ESI is 0.96.

Being the only detectable planet in the system and having low stellar metallicity (Sun’s 40%), the planet is highly likely to have formed in situ and formed rocky like Earth.

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Simbad - 2MASS J19432996+5059289
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A-L-E-X
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13 May 2019 13:00

JackDole wrote:
Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post There's a candidate planet that may be close to confirmation. It's a 1.1±0.1 Earth-radius planet in a 365.4 day orbit around a 0.97 solar-radius sun. If it is confirmed, it would be the _first_ true Earth-analogue.

scr00008.jpg :|

JD you already made an addon for it?!  Can we download it?

Stellarator, complex life might be rare, but microbial life might be fairly common.  Even things like lichen can live on the exterior of the ISS and quite possibly on Mars.
 
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Stellarator
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13 May 2019 19:37

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Stellarator, complex life might be rare, but microbial life might be fairly common.

I agree.

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post Centauri Dreams

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Simbad - 2MASS J19432996+5059289

Thanks for the additional info G!

I am curious to see if they know how old the system is. That could really solidify any notion of habitability. If it is younger then a few hundred million years, it's habitability would be precocious. If the system is very old on the other hand, then the planet might have only recently found itself in the HZ as its parent star slowly heated up during its main sequence.
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17 May 2019 00:30

If I remember right, Metallicity can be a decent way to tell age. Less metals = older star, and vice versa
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