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AnimsSpace
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

26 Dec 2016 01:53

Beautiful Picture.
Space is so Beautiful, very.
 
scalbers
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

28 Dec 2016 10:25

Greetings from an SE newbie - here is a magnified animation of a lunar eclipse seen from the moon:

http://stevealbers.net/albers/lunar/lun ... op_16k.gif

allsky_rgb_polar_060000_crop_16k.png


allsky_rgb_polar_081600_crop_16k.png


More info is in this UMSF thread in posts 33-34 and Don Davis' recent work is in post 32.

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/inde ... t&p=233760

Further descriptive info is on my website here:

http://stevealbers.net/albers/lunar/lunar.html

The key here is looking at the sunlight interacting with Earth's atmosphere, including refraction, scattering, and clouds.

Here are some simulations involving solar eclipses as well:

http://stevealbers.net/albers/allsky/eclipse.html (views from the ground and the stratosphere)

http://stevealbers.net/albers/allsky/outerspace.html (views from space)
 
scalbers
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

16 Jan 2017 16:09

Hornblower wrote:
I've watched hundreds of sunsets in orbit. Like you can see in the picture in message 11, only the atmosphere closest to the planet appears red and when the sun is seen through that atmosphere it appears red.

And here's a picture I took myself
IMG_0869.png
IMG_0869.png (188.08 KiB) Viewed 1372 times

Thanks for posting your actual sunset picture from orbit, how cool is that? This is an interesting example to simulate and here is the result, also showing the red atmosphere only in the very lower layer.
allsky_rgb_polar_0130_-82.3_400000.png

Note the sun in the simulation is hiding somewhere in the atmosphere without camera flare being modeled.
 
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

10 Feb 2017 05:02

 
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Xoran
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

13 Feb 2017 11:01

Hornblower wrote:
Source of the post I've watched hundreds of sunsets in orbit. Like you can see in the picture in message 11, only the atmosphere closest to the planet appears red and when the sun is seen through that atmosphere it appears red.This video is what it looks like in real time.


"I've watched hundreds of sunsets in orbit"
Are you on the ISS or something?
Space is too big to understand, so do not try to understand.
 
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

13 Feb 2017 12:59

Xoran wrote:
Source of the post Are you on the ISS or something?

Maybe...
"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
 
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

14 Feb 2017 01:09

With our patented blend of herbs and supplements for activating your crown chakra, and the power of the internet, you can be almost anywhere!
 
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Banana
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

18 Feb 2017 19:39

Ah, eclipses. The events I always try to view but miss for some reason or the other.
Bananas are eggcellent.
 
KyranB
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

09 Apr 2017 07:59

Hornblower wrote:
I've watched hundreds of sunsets in orbit. Like you can see in the picture in message 11, only the atmosphere closest to the planet appears red and when the sun is seen through that atmosphere it appears red.
This video is what it looks like in real time.


And here's a picture I took myself
IMG_0869.PNG
How did you take this? like how does it look so good, i just got Space engine, but in particular, planets look really low quality, and how do you have the ISS lol
 
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Mosfet
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

09 Apr 2017 08:53

KyranB, he took the picture from an online/live camera.
As for the planets being low quality, I'm guessing here you're referring to Solar System objects, see the FAQ.
If I'm not mistaken there was an ISS model around here, I'm pretty sure we'll have it again in a SE version orbiting around Earth. SoonTM.
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A-L-E-X
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

09 Apr 2017 19:36

Actually with a moderate sized telescope you can take pictures of the ISS with a bit of detail on it.  With a 14 inch SCT you can actually see windows on the ISS while with an 8 inch SCT you can make out areas of different brightness.
 
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

09 Apr 2017 22:06

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post With a 14 inch SCT you can actually see windows on the ISS

I thought that was pretty surprising!  But it seems to be true.  With 14 inches aperture your resolution should be a little better than a meter at 400km.  At that point your more limited by the atmospheric turbulence, since you need sub arc-second seeing.
 
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

10 Apr 2017 02:00

Watsisname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post With a 14 inch SCT you can actually see windows on the ISS

I thought that was pretty surprising!  But it seems to be true.  With 14 inches aperture your resolution should be a little better than a meter at 400km.  At that point your more limited by the atmospheric turbulence, since you need sub arc-second seeing.



I was shocked too!  But I saw the images posted- they are a bit on the blurry side but you can clearly make out the windows.  If I can find them I shall post them again.  The minimum you need to detect any variations on the ISS is an 8 inch scope.
 
A-L-E-X
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

10 Apr 2017 02:40

Well, I guess you can see spacewalking astronauts too ;-)

https://www.wired.com/2009/12/a-spacewa ... rom-earth/

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badas ... he-ground/

https://www.google.com/search?q=picture ... 80&bih=935

You can clearly see a spacewalking astronaut in that shot captured with a camera attached to an 8.5" aperture telescope :)

That site has some interesting simulations of Trappist-1 also

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-bri ... -bad-news/

and a different kind of planet that could harbor life

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/?p=19343
 
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An'shur
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Space Engine - Solar/Lunar Eclipses

22 May 2017 05:12

Eclipses? Very well...

Image
Phobos casts shadow on Mars. (Dark spot near Noctis Labyrinthus)

Image
Triton eclipses Neptune

Image
Io eclipsed by Europa

Image
Io eclipsed by Callisto

Image
Europa experiences a total lunar eclipse by Ganymede

Image
Dione by Enceladus

Image
Enceladus casts a light shadow on Titan. It's too far to cause a total or even an annular eclipse. It merely transits the Sun as seen from Titan.

Image
Messier 2 behind Oberon eclipsed by Umbriel

Image
Ariel by Umbriel

Image
Miranda's shadow on Titania. This one was a bit harder to get, given the inclination of Miranda's orbit.

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