Free planetarium

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Starlight Glimmer
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SE Object Extremes

27 Nov 2016 09:51

JackDole wrote:
Starlight Glimmer wrote:
I found a massive one, or should I say 2 of them. 

Actually, the luminosity is much too low in Space Engine.
According to Wikipedia, has 'R136a1' a solar luminosity of 8710000!

What seems to be quite normal for Wolf-Rayet stars.

Wow! Can you fix the luminosity? It's also actually a single star. 
 
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Hornblower
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SE Object Extremes

30 Nov 2016 12:48

I wonder if there's a most pi planet. It would have a rotational period of 3.14 days, an orbital period of 3.14 years, 3.14 atm, 3.14 earth masses etc.
"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
 
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Andromeda
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SE Object Extremes

12 Jan 2017 16:00

JackDole wrote:
Source of the post Actually, the luminosity is much too low in Space Engine.
According to Wikipedia, has 'R136a1' a solar luminosity of 8710000!

This figure is the sum of all wavelengths (including UV and Infrared) and Space Engine only shows visible light. The current one is the best we can do without messing up the apparent magnitude (I accidentally made VY CMa a first-magnitude star in this way).
 
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ahoop
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SE Object Extremes

14 Jan 2017 13:38

Hornblower, I'll make one if you want, what would/should the spectrum be?
I'll go with M-type.
Here you go: http://en.spaceengine.org/forum/10-2322-7#75537
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Hornblower
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SE Object Extremes

14 Jan 2017 19:30

ahoop, thanks, but I put my message in this thread as a challenge to find a very pi planet without an addon. Something that anyone with the base game could search for
"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
 
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Watsisname
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SE Object Extremes

15 Jan 2017 04:57

I like the idea of finding a [math]-planet.  I've also just found a [math] planet!  

Here it is:
 
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FastFourierTransform
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SE Object Extremes

15 Jan 2017 05:45

Watsisname:

Here it is:

Image
 
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An'shur
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SE Object Extremes

18 Jan 2017 06:08

Smallest red dwarf I have found so far. Look at the size of that thing...

Image
It also has a planetary system. Some of these planets are big enough to cause total solar eclipses on the outer worlds.

Edit: I went searching even smaller stars on purpose right after I found the one above.. I actually doubt that 24428.65 km red dwarfs can exist. Here is a pic, zoomed in with it's first planet behind.
Image
 
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Andromeda
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SE Object Extremes

21 Jan 2017 07:23

Here are some categories to add:
Smallest elliptical galaxy: RG 0-9-22029825-1191 - 495.26 light years
Smallest irregular galaxy: RG 0-9-8183055-1271 - 596.74 light years
Densest atmosphere on a rocky planet: RS 8474-1792-8-9446817-932 1 - 11,500 atm
Densest atmosphere on a rocky moon: RS 2277-30980-7-556052-70 4.1 - 812 atm
Highest percentage of planets with life in a system: RS 8474-1792-8-9446788-910 - 50% of the planets have life
Highest semimajor axis on a moon: RS 8474-1792-7-1181103-113 2.D65 - 10.41 AU
Closest binary planets in mass: HIP 32677 9 - Moon is 99.48% the mass of the planet

Also please make a rule that objects must be procedural (but may orbit catalog stars) because SE generation works differently from the catalog. Otherwise the darkest star will just be WISE 08551-07144 at 9.2731 x 10-14 L☉ and there's no point in even looking anymore since nothing can beat it...
 
TheSpaceNerd123
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SE Object Extremes

21 Jan 2017 17:31

Hey guys, I have a SE discovery wiki, (To go there
 
TheSpaceNerd123
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SE Object Extremes

21 Jan 2017 17:38

Woops, ignore that one above xD, anyway I have a space engine discovery wiki (To go there, click here.) So if you want to add your planets to there you can! (If you wana use the baseline I have on the other pages you can, it will be below also, Note it is yellow and bold because the black background)
[color=#ffc000][size=120][font=Calibri]Galaxy Type:[/font][/size][/color]

Class:

Life:

Diameter:

Orbital Period:

Rotational Period:

Gravity:

Atmospheric Pressure:

Temperature:

Greenhouse Effect:

Moons:

Parent Star(s) Count:

[color=#ffc000][size=120][font=Calibri]Parent Star(s) Class:[/font][/size][/color]
 
LightenSoulz
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SE Object Extremes

01 Feb 2017 13:47

Found the largest star!

► Show Spoiler
 
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John Boone
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SE Object Extremes

01 Feb 2017 17:27

LightenSoulz wrote:
Found the largest star!

► Show Spoiler

that star has less surface gravity than phobos, can it exist like that?
if replaced with the sun, it would devour every known object bound to the sun's gravity, even swallowing voyager 1!
i feel like a star that big coudn't exist, even theoretically.
Maybe it’s a little early. Maybe the time is not quite yet. But those other worlds — promising untold opportunities — beckon. Silently, they orbit the Sun, waiting -Carl Segan
 
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Gnargenox
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SE Object Extremes

01 Feb 2017 17:53

This one is not the least luminous Brown Dwarf found so far, Hornblower posted one with a much lower luminosity but I really liked the purple color versus the typical orange you might find.

Not seen in the first pic is the bright orange color seen in the bands of clouds on the dark side. They emit a brighter orange color showing nuclear fusion I believe. I'll attach a pic of that too.
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problemecium
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SE Object Extremes

01 Feb 2017 22:45

Has anyone found a white dwarf rotating faster than this?
I found it by chance and was impressed when I could clearly see it rotating in real time (at low exposure of course):
Image
It does make sense for it to be spinning this fast, particularly given the presence of the accretion disk, so I won't be surprised if people start finding lots of others spinning even faster.
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Formerly known as "parameciumkid." Still playing on Intel HD Graphics 4000 ^^
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