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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 26 Aug 2018 15:24
by JKerman
TheRedstoneHive wrote:
Found a better one, which is now officially my Earth 2.0 (Unless I find a better planet in the future).
RS 8474-1359-8-11920345-195 4:
Cold (-98 oC) desert with unicellular life;
Parent star: M1.4V Dwarf;
Rotation period Tidally Locked;
ESI (Earth simularity inxex): 0.658
Atmospheric pressure: 0.517 atm
Atmospheric comp:
O2: 93.2% (0.481 atm)
CO2: 6.76% (0.0349 atm)
CH4: 594 ppm (0.000307 atm)
C2H4: 59.4 ppm (3.07x10-5 atm)
H2S: 29.7 ppm (1.54x10-5 atm)
H2: 20.1 ppm (1.04x10-5 atm)

The air is little thin, and it might not be that comfortable to breathe, but it is still a nice place to explore, and if I had the choice, I would go on holiday to stay here for a year or two, if we could travel the thousands of light years in a short time :)

Here are a couple of screenshots of the planet:
RS 8474-1359-8-11920345-195 4.png
What do you think I should call it?

Nice! The best thing is that there’s no SO2, which is the biggest problem we have. Though, the temperature is a bit low. You’d have to be directly under the sun for tolerable temperatures, but since the planet’s tidally locked, you’d probably have to deal with winds upwards of 500 miles an hour. The best spot would definitely be the eye of the storm. The winds would be very low there, and the temperature would be higher.

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 26 Aug 2018 16:00
by Stellarator
JKerman wrote:
Well, the problem with the sulfur dioxide is that even a tiny amount in the atmosphere can be harmful over an extended period of time, and the toxicity is measured by concentration, not partial pressure. 100ppm is lethal in minutes, 50ppm is lethal in a few days, and anything above 5ppm can eventually cause permanent damage if inhaled continuously. Even down to 1ppm, it would smell pretty badly.

The SE 0.9.8.0 terra's are famous for being basically unbreathable because of the overabundant sulphur dioxide, even if we ignore all other atmospheric gasses.

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 26 Aug 2018 16:06
by Gnargenox
Realistically, at atmospheric pressure, pure SO2 will begin to condense at –10.1°C (13.9°F). If the gas is compressed to 388 kPa(g) (56.3 psig), SO2 will begin to condense at 32.2°C (90°F). Most planets we stumble across are cold enough it would all be trapped in the Polar caps.

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 27 Aug 2018 05:34
by Watsisname
Thanks, Gnargenox, that's good info to have as reference.  In addition there are non-thermal (photo-chemical) ways of removing SO2 from atmospheres, so yeah I think in general the concentrations we find on planets should realistically be much lower. :)

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 08 Sep 2018 00:00
by TheRedstoneHive
JKerman wrote:
TheRedstoneHive wrote:
Found a better one, which is now officially my Earth 2.0 (Unless I find a better planet in the future).
RS 8474-1359-8-11920345-195 4:
Cold (-98 oC) desert with unicellular life;
Parent star: M1.4V Dwarf;
Rotation period Tidally Locked;
ESI (Earth simularity inxex): 0.658
Atmospheric pressure: 0.517 atm
Atmospheric comp:
O2: 93.2% (0.481 atm)
CO2: 6.76% (0.0349 atm)
CH4: 594 ppm (0.000307 atm)
C2H4: 59.4 ppm (3.07x10-5 atm)
H2S: 29.7 ppm (1.54x10-5 atm)
H2: 20.1 ppm (1.04x10-5 atm)

The air is little thin, and it might not be that comfortable to breathe, but it is still a nice place to explore, and if I had the choice, I would go on holiday to stay here for a year or two, if we could travel the thousands of light years in a short time :)

Here are a couple of screenshots of the planet:
RS 8474-1359-8-11920345-195 4.png
What do you think I should call it?

Nice! The best thing is that there’s no SO2, which is the biggest problem we have. Though, the temperature is a bit low. You’d have to be directly under the sun for tolerable temperatures, but since the planet’s tidally locked, you’d probably have to deal with winds upwards of 500 miles an hour. The best spot would definitely be the eye of the storm. The winds would be very low there, and the temperature would be higher.

It turns out that in the eye of the storm the elevation is very high, the pressure is below 0.07 atm :(

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 08 Nov 2018 15:54
by An'shur
Image

Image
Almost breathable. SOseems to be tolerable, but the hydrogen sulfide would stink. The party pooper here is CO2, and the temperature of course.

Image
This one is not breathable, but it is a curious find.

Image
What about this atmosphere would kill you first? The high pressure or the fact that it has too much of carbon dioxide, over the top amount of sulfur dioxide and even too much oxygen?

Out of curiosity, has anyone ever located a titan or an ice world with an atmosphere that might be breathable?

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 19 Nov 2018 11:57
by DeMooniC
https://ibb.co/mjv55L
As in all planets... the problem is the temperature and the co2 its a bit high but you can survive by very long periods of time on the planet breathing freely

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 19 Nov 2018 12:00
by DeMooniC

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 19 Nov 2018 16:45
by Gnargenox
Congratulations DeMooniC! We're not all dead! Great planet hunting skills indeed! Lets land and start planting flags!

That's a pretty rich mix (O2 @ 82.3%), close to what you would choose to breathe if you were mountain climbing, and the planet's air pressure (0.261 ATM) is around what you'd expect at ten thousand meters high, or 1,200m higher than Everest, but at around 60°F.

The best thing about your planet is the high O2 air content (or partial pressure) at 82.3%. Just like any mountain climber, you will need that when the air is thin. With your planet's low air pressure it's hard to push the oxygen into the blood system. That means your lungs and diaphragm have to work harder breathing at sea level on your planet just like at higher altitudes on Earth. That is, if you only had 21% O2.

At low altitudes on Earth the normal healthy adult resting rate is 12 breaths per minute holding about 500mL in the lungs, giving a total of 6 liters per minute. Light work needs about 50 liters per minute and 100 liters per minute is considered hard work. Around 180 liters per minute is maximum effort at 21% O2.

So, at around a quarter of the normal air pressure on your planet (compared to Earth) you would need to hit your maximum breathing effort to get just around 50 liters per minute of ANY air. That means just sitting there minding your own business would exhaust you, that is though, if you only had the same percentage of oxygen as we do on Earth, 21%. Thank goodness your planet has packed the air O2 for us humans!

Here's a few cool calculators to find out if you can breathe at different ATMs with various O2 partial pressures.

Air Pressure at Elevation Calculator

Altitude Air Pressure calculator

With the first, calculate what your elevation would be on Earth based on air pressure or ATM. (You have .261 ATM so that's about 10,000m). Then on the next calculator enter your altitude or elevation to find out the percentage of available oxygen at your Elevation. (at 10,000m inspired O2 is about 28% of 21% of partial pressure oxygen, or 5.88% in your blood, meaning death, but at 28% of 82.3% is 23% partial pressure of oxygen, YAY!) It looks like SE calculated 21.4%

Effects on Body's Oxygen Supply This last calculator is really cool!  

On this one, enter how hard you are breathing, lets say 15 breaths per minute, enter your elevation (as if you were on Earth), Enter the FiO2, the fraction of inspired (breathed in) oxygen or the same as the partial pressure (82.3%). On Earth including water vapor it would be around 20.7%. But, all the water vapor has fallen out of the sky on your frigid planet though. The air is so dry it would desiccate your nasal and throat passages. You might need a neck contraption that squirts water vapor up your nose now and then, making you look pretty scary to any native life on the planet.

The last calculator shows that on your planet with .261 ATM and 82.3% partial pressure of O2, the pressure of O2 in your blood would be within tolerable ranges even when not breathing hard. Your hemoglobin content would be just a percentage or two less than walking about on Earth smelling the flowers. On your planet your might seriously consider giving up cigarettes because I still think you're going to need to breathe hard for a good gulp of air. Just try not to hyperventilate.

What would be super cool are the Acetylene (C2H2) snow flurries all over the planet. Even with the high oxygen content it would not combust. It would have a very small window to be in liquid form at such low air pressures. It would be a blast trying to set the snow storms on fire!

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 23 Nov 2018 12:29
by Betelgeuze
Is possible to find gas giants with breathable atmosphere to humans like Bespin from Star Wars, If gas giant is breathable then it would to build cloud cities

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 23 Nov 2018 20:02
by Stellarator
Probably not - though it is possible with gas-giants that orbit in a habitable zone of it's star, provided that it has some O2 content in it's high atmosphere. Needless to say, O2 doesn't occur naturally in jovian atmospheres. A much more realistic open-air cloud city could be in the high atmosphere of a Venusian or super-earth planet, usually in the stratosphere (at about 70 km in this picture):
Image

However, open-air wouldn't be a good idea in any atmosphere for any floating-city, since malfunction could be disastrous. These cities would either hang from orbital-anchors or be buoyed on the denser atmosphere of the planet by compartments filled with lighter gases (like helium, or even oxygen as with the atmosphere of Venus - though that isn't recommended as the sole source of buoyancy).

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 23 Nov 2018 22:47
by A-L-E-X
I've heard of cloud city possibilities for a planet like Venus though.

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 24 Nov 2018 07:31
by Watsisname
I kind of question why anyone would want to live in a cloud city on Venus, to be honest.  The typically described range of altitudes for having them lies within layers of haze, so there would not be much to look at.  I feel the novelty would wear off pretty fast.

We also already have cloud cities, at least sometimes, on Earth.  Not floating, though. :)

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 24 Nov 2018 10:20
by midtskogen
Gravity is fine on Venus.  Temperature is also fine at the altitude with reasonable pressure.  Cabin fever, however, might become a serious problem for the inhabitants.  But it's still likely healthier to live on Venus than Mars.

Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

Posted: 24 Nov 2018 12:15
by Gnargenox
It's also very possible you could catch a nasty poop bug and die, cooped up in a sardine can.

Five strains of Enterobacter are floating around the ISS right now. Most likely culprits are the toilet and exercise area. 80% likely to cause disease to any of the astronauts.

https://nypost.com/2018/11/23/internati ... ious-bugs/