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Starlight Glimmer
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

18 Jul 2017 15:58

Wow. That is a very impressive and interesting viewpoint you have there. I've read it over several times and marvel at what you have posted. I'd personally say, fix earth, colonize moon. But that is off topic. 

I'll take a break from searching. I have already found 2 planets, including this one in the past. I will keep up searching, for a possible better planet. 
 
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

18 Jul 2017 17:19

So I uploaded a video on Terra 2, seeing as it's quite a nicely balanced planet. It's still slightly uninhabitable afaik, from what you guys have said, but hopefully it's not too far off :)



Perhaps I will make some follow up videos on the other very suitable terra you guys have found (with full credit to discoverers :D)... Stay tuned...
 
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

18 Jul 2017 17:26

ImperiumAssertor wrote:
So I uploaded a video on Terra 2, seeing as it's quite a nicely balanced planet. It's still slightly uninhabitable afaik, from what you guys have said, but hopefully it's not too far off :)



Perhaps I will make some follow up videos on the other very suitable terra you guys have found (with full credit to discoverers :D)... Stay tuned...

Thats all good except for one thing....
Way too much SO2. You'd die in less than an hour. See the previous posts. I'd like follow up videos though. 

You need SO2 levels less than 5 PPM. A number of 0.0001 means you have about an hour to live. Watch out for H2S gas also. 
 
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

18 Jul 2017 17:36

Yeah, sad thing that. It's at least 10 times too high. I recorded this video a few weeks back though, so just went ahead with it. I like especially that it's got a perfect day length and a good temperature too, something which too many of the borderline-breathable planets out there lack...

The only hope is a mask or an implant, which can filter out the SO2 and a bit of the CO2 (which is twice as high as safe maximum.)

Follow up videos to come then :)
 
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

18 Jul 2017 17:38

ImperiumAssertor wrote:
Yeah, sad thing that. It's at least 10 times too high. I recorded this video a few weeks back though, so just went ahead with it. I like especially that it's got a perfect day length and a good temperature too, something which too many of the borderline-breathable planets out there lack...

The only hope is a mask or an implant, which can filter out the SO2 and a bit of the CO2 (which is twice as high as safe maximum.)

Follow up videos to come then :)

Its very close though. Mine has a perfect day length too.  :)
 
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

18 Jul 2017 17:42

Starlight Glimmer wrote:
ImperiumAssertor wrote:
Yeah, sad thing that. It's at least 10 times too high. I recorded this video a few weeks back though, so just went ahead with it. I like especially that it's got a perfect day length and a good temperature too, something which too many of the borderline-breathable planets out there lack...

The only hope is a mask or an implant, which can filter out the SO2 and a bit of the CO2 (which is twice as high as safe maximum.)

Follow up videos to come then :)

Its very close though. Mine has a perfect day length too.  :)

Ah that one, so it does! That's a real beauty. Featherweight easy going gravity too. Wow. If I make a follow up video it'll be on that one first.
 
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

18 Jul 2017 17:43

ImperiumAssertor wrote:
Starlight Glimmer wrote:
ImperiumAssertor wrote:
Yeah, sad thing that. It's at least 10 times too high. I recorded this video a few weeks back though, so just went ahead with it. I like especially that it's got a perfect day length and a good temperature too, something which too many of the borderline-breathable planets out there lack...

The only hope is a mask or an implant, which can filter out the SO2 and a bit of the CO2 (which is twice as high as safe maximum.)

Follow up videos to come then :)

Its very close though. Mine has a perfect day length too.  :)

Ah that one, so it does! That's a real beauty. Featherweight easy going gravity too. Wow. If I make a follow up video it'll be on that one first.

Hahaha! Thank you so much!  :D :D
 
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

18 Jul 2017 20:34

Great video on the breathability (is that a word?) of exoplanet atmospheres ImperiumAssertor! I really like the documentary feel.
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

18 Jul 2017 21:26

Gnargenox wrote:
Freaking COOOOOL!!! Time to celebrate! I need to start staking out property on your planet hehe. What will it be called? I've been dieing for a cigarette and it will be so nice to be able to finally have a smoke on a different planet, wow, wow, wow! BTW, Inspired Oxygen at 84.3% can be dangerous. 60% is the limit for oxygen therapy, and I don't think getting to a higher altitude can fix that. Still... This planet should be inducted into the Hall of Habitable Homeworlds.

Atmospheric Analysis: .573atm total atmospheric pressure @ -91.968°C (-133.5°F)
------------------------------
CH4 .274% .00157atm
Methane, nontoxic, yet it is extremely flammable and may form explosive mixtures with air. Methane is violently reactive with oxidizers, halogen, and some halogen-containing compounds. Methane is also an asphyxiant and may displace oxygen in an enclosed space. Not including Water Vapor, Methane accounts for 20% of the total radiative forcing from all of the long-lived and globally mixed greenhouse gases. Methane has been detected or is believed to exist on all planets of the solar system and most of the larger moons, even Halley's Comet. With the possible exception of Mars, it is believed to have come from abiotic processes. On Mars it may be a byproduct of electrical discharges from dust devils and dust storms, or that it may be the result of UV radiation. Or from life way below the surface LOL. Titan has thousands of Methane lakes and it rains Methane. It was also detected on extrasolar planet HD 189733b. Its origin is unknown, since the planet's high temperature (700 °C) would normally favor the formation of carbon monoxide instead.

C2H2 .102% .000583atm
Acetylene, used for oxyacetylene gas welding and cutting. Might be solid at low temperatures, but only at a normal 1 atm, so it is a vapor on your planet. Very small temperature and pressure window to remain as a liquid. Occurs naturally in the atmosphere of the moon Enceladus, coming from chemical reactions underground at high temperatures and released in thermal venting. At around 2 atm pressure and higher it can decompose explosively from intense heat or a shockwave into benzene, carbon and hydrogen. Copper catalyses the decomposition of acetylene, so don't store it in containers with copper fittings.

C2H4     340 ppm     .000195 atm
Ethylene, the oil-making gas, is a colorless flammable gas with a faint "sweet and musky" odor when pure. Worldwide production exceeds that of any other organic compound, mostly for plastics. It is also an important natural plant hormone, and is used in agriculture to force the ripening of fruits. The famous Greek Oracle at Delphi (the Pythia) went into her trance-like state as an effect of Ethylene rising from ground faults. Like all hydrocarbons, ethylene is an asphyxiant and combustible. It is listed as an IARC class 3 carcinogen as there is no evidence at present that it causes cancer in humans.

H2S     82 ppm    4.69*10^-5 atm
Hydrogen sulfide, toxicity is comparable with that of Carbon Monoxide. Detoxification is effected by oxidation to Sulfate, which is harmless. Hence, low levels of Hydrogen Sulfide may be tolerated indefinitely. At some threshold level, believed to average around 300–350 ppm, the oxidative enzymes become overwhelmed. Eventually the gas is converted to sulfite in the mitochondria by Thiosulfate reductase, and the Dulfite is further oxidized to Thiosulfate and Sulfate by Sulfite Oxidase. The Sulfates are excreted in the urine. Diagnostic of extreme poisoning by H2S is the discolouration of copper coins in the pockets of the victim. Treatment involves immediate inhalation of Amyl Nitrite, injections of Sodium Nitrite, or administration of 4-dimethylaminophenol in combination with inhalation of pure Oxygen, administration of bronchodilators to overcome eventual bronchospasm, and in some cases hyperbaric Oxygen therapy. **Chronic exposure to low level H2S (around 2 ppm) has been implicated in increased miscarriage and reproductive health issues.** In 2014, Levels of Hydrogen Sulfide as high as 83 ppm have been detected at a recently built mall in Thailand called Siam Square One at the Siam Square area. Shop tenants at the mall reported health complications such as sinus inflammation, breathing difficulties and eye irritation. After investigation it was determined that the large amount of gas originated from imperfect treatment and disposal of waste water in the building. In June 2016, a mother and her daughter were found deceased in their Porsche SUV. The medical examiner determined the cause to be hydrogen sulfide intoxication from the vehicles battery located under the driver seat. In January 2017, three utility workers in Key Largo, Florida, died one by one within seconds of descending into a narrow space beneath a manhole to check a section of paved street. **In 2005, it was shown that mice can be put into a state of suspended animation-like hypothermia by applying a low dosage of Hydrogen Sulfide (81 ppm) in the air. The breathing rate of the animals sank from 120 to 10 breaths per minute and their temperature fell from 37 °C to just 2 °C above ambient temperature (in effect, they had become cold-blooded). The mice survived this procedure for 6 hours and afterwards showed no negative health consequences.** Several groups of bacteria can use Hydrogen Sulfide as fuel, oxidizing it to elemental Sulfur or to Sulfate by using dissolved Oxygen, metal oxides or Nitrate as oxidant. The Purple Sulfur bacteria and the Green Sulfur bacteria use Hydrogen Sulfide as an electron donor in photosynthesis, thereby producing elemental Sulfur. In fact, this mode of photosynthesis is older than the mode of cyanobacteria, algae, and plants, which uses water as electron donor and liberates oxygen. Hydrogen Sulfide has been implicated in several mass extinctions that have occurred in the Earth's past. In particular, a buildup of Hydrogen Sulfide in the atmosphere may have caused the Permian-Triassic extinction event over 250 million years ago. High levels of hydrogen sulfide are lethal to most animals, but a few highly specialized species (extremophiles) do thrive in habitats that are rich in this chemical.

Explosive limits - 4.3–46%
Detection - 0.00047 ppm is the odor threshold, the point at which 50% of a human panel can detect the presence of an odor without being able to identify it.
Recommended exposure limit - 10 ppm, less than 10-minutes
Permissible exposure limit -
    10 ppm is the OSHA permissible exposure limit (8 hour time-weighted average).
    10–20 ppm is the borderline concentration for eye irritation.
    20 ppm is the acceptable ceiling concentration established by OSHA.
    50 ppm is the acceptable maximum peak above the ceiling concentration for an 8-hour shift, with a max duration of 10 min.
Immediately dangerous to life -
    50–100 ppm leads to eye damage.
    100–150 ppm the olfactory nerve is paralyzed after a few inhalations, and the sense of smell disappears, often together with awareness of danger.
    320–530 ppm leads to pulmonary edema with the possibility of death.
    530+ ppm causes strong stimulation of the central nervous system and rapid breathing, leading to loss of breathing.
Lethal Concentrations (median)
    713 ppm (rat, 1 hr)
    673 ppm (mouse, 1 hr)
    634 ppm (mouse, 1 hr)
    444 ppm (rat, 4 hr)
Lethal Concentrations (lowest published)
    600 ppm (human, 30 min)
    800 ppm Lethal for 50% of humans for 5 minutes' exposure.     
    > 1000 ppm cause immediate collapse with loss of breathing, even after inhalation of a single breath.

C2H6     5.28 ppm     3.02*10^-6 atm
Ethane, occurs as a trace gas in the Earth's atmosphere, currently having a concentration at sea level of 0.5 ppb. At room temperature and Earth's atmospheric pressure is a flammable gas. When mixed with air at 3.0%–12.5% by volume, it forms an explosive mixture. Ethane can displace oxygen and become an asphyxiation hazard. Ethane poses no known acute or chronic toxicological risk. It is not a carcinogen. Ethane is a greenhouse gas. It has been detected as a trace component in the atmospheres of all four giant planets, and in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan. It was once widely hypothesized that Ethane produced on Titan rained back onto the moon's surface, and over time had accumulated into hydrocarbon seas or oceans covering much of the moon's surface. Infrared telescopic observations cast significant doubt on this hypothesis, and the Huygens probe, which landed on Titan in 2005, failed to observe any surface liquids, although it did photograph features that could be presently dry drainage channels. In December 2007 the Cassini probe found at least one lake at Titan's south pole, now called Ontario Lacus because of the lake's similar area to Lake Ontario on Earth (approximately 20,000 km2). Further analysis of infrared spectroscopic data presented in July 2008 provided stronger evidence for the presence of liquid Ethane in Ontario Lacus. Ethane is also on the surface of Pluto.

CO    4.22 ppm    2.42*10^-6 atm
Carbon monoxide, the silent killer, because it is indetectable to humans and can kill within minutes. It already claims hundreds of lives each year, and survivors of CO poisoning can be left with psychological and neurological symptoms. It is toxic to hemoglobic animals (both invertebrate and vertebrate, including humans) when encountered in concentrations above about 35 ppm, although it is also produced in normal animal metabolism in low quantities, and is thought to have some normal biological functions. In the atmosphere, it is spatially variable and short lived, having a role in the formation of ground-level ozone. Aristotle (384–322 BC) first recorded that burning coals produced toxic fumes. An ancient method of execution was to shut the criminal in a bathing room with smoldering coals. What was not known was the mechanism of death. Worldwide, the largest source of Carbon Monoxide is natural in origin, due to photochemical reactions in the troposphere that generate about 5×10^12 kilograms per year. Other natural sources of CO include volcanoes, forest fires, and other forms of combustion. Outside of Earth, Carbon Monoxide is the second-most common molecule in the interstellar medium, after molecular Hydrogen. Because of its asymmetry, the Carbon Monoxide molecule produces far brighter spectral lines than the Hydrogen molecule, making CO much easier to detect. Interstellar CO was first detected with radio telescopes in 1970. It is now the most commonly used tracer of molecular gas in general in the interstellar medium of galaxies, as molecular Hydrogen can only be detected using ultraviolet light, which requires space telescopes. Carbon monoxide observations provide much of the information about the molecular clouds in which most stars form. Beta Pictoris, the second brightest star in the constellation Pictor, shows an excess of infrared emission compared to normal stars of its type, which is caused by large quantities of dust and gas (including Carbon Monoxide) near the star.

0.1 ppmv        Natural atmosphere level
0.5–5 ppmv    Average level in homes
5–15 ppmv    Near-properly adjusted gas stoves in homes, modern vehicle exhaust emissions
17 ppmv        Atmosphere of Venus (result of the photodissociation of carbon dioxide by electromagnetic radiation of wavelengths shorter than 169 nm.)
100–200 ppmv    Exhaust from automobiles in the Mexico City central area in 1975
700 ppmv        Atmosphere of Mars
5,000 ppmv    Exhaust from a home wood fire
7,000 ppmv     Undiluted warm car exhaust without a catalytic converter

Explosive limits - 12.5–74.2%
Detection levels - odorless & colorless
Recommended exposure limit - Time Weighted Avg 35 ppm  
    C 200 ppm
Permissible exposure limit - TWA 50 ppm
Immediately dangerous to life - 1200 ppm
    > 667 ppm may cause up to 50% of the body's hemoglobin to convert to carboxyhemoglobin. A level of 50% carboxyhemoglobin may result in seizure, coma, and fatality.
Lethal Concentrations (median)
    8636 ppm (rat, 15 min)
    5207 ppm (rat, 30 min)
    1784 ppm (rat, 4 hr)
    2414 ppm (mouse, 4 hr)
    5647 ppm (guinea pig, 4 hr)
Lethal Concentrations (lowest published)
    4000 ppm (human, 30 min)
    5000 ppm (human, 5 min)

Ar    3.34 ppm    1.91*10^-6 atm
Argon, the lazy gas, is the third-most abundant gas in the Earth's atmosphere, at 0.934% (9340 ppm). It is still considered a dangerous asphyxiant in closed areas, since it is difficult to detect, it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless. One person has died from asphyxiation in an argon-filled section of an oil pipe under construction in Alaska, so, don't even worry about it.

SO2    3.25 ppm    1.86*10^-6 atm
Sulfur dioxide, used by the Romans in winemaking when they discovered that burning Sulfur candles inside empty wine vessels kept them fresh and free from the vinegar smell. Its antimicrobial action also helps to minimize volatile acidity. Sulfur dioxide is responsible for the words "contains sulfites" found on wine labels. It is found on Earth and exists in very small concentrations and in the atmosphere at about 1 ppm. On Venus it is in the atmosphere at about 150ppm. Early in the life of Mars it was nearly as high as 100ppm. The atmosphere of Io is 90% Sulfur Dioxide and trace amounts are thought to also exist in the atmosphere of Jupiter. In low concentrations SO2 causes endothelium-dependent vasodilation. In higher concentrations it causes endothelium-independent vasodilation and has a negative inotropic effect on cardiac output function, thus effectively lowering blood pressure and myocardial oxygen consumption. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists reduced the short-term exposure limit to 0.25ppm. The OSHA Permissible exposure limit is currently set at 5 ppm for up to 8 hours. Exposure to SO2 is associated with premature birth. 3.25ppm is totally within the safe range, so, finally a planet without too much SO2! Just don't play outside too long ;)

Lethal dose or concentration:
LC50 (median concentration)
    3000 ppm (mouse, 30 min)
    2520 ppm (rat, 1 hr)
LCLo (lowest published)
    993 ppm (rat, 20 min)
    611 ppm (rat, 5 hr)
    764 ppm (mouse, 20 min)
    1000 ppm (human, 10 min)
    3000 ppm (human, 5 min)

US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
    TWA 5 ppm (13 mg/m3)
REL (Recommended)
    TWA 2 ppm (5 mg/m3) ST 5 ppm (13 mg/m3)
IDLH (Immediate danger)
    100 ppm

Ne    3.11 ppm    1.78*10^-6 atm
Neon, very abundant on a universal scale; it is the fifth most abundant chemical element in the universe by mass, after Hydrogen, Helium, Oxygen, and Carbon. It is the second-lightest noble gas, after Helium. On Earth it occurs at around 18.2ppm. Neon poses no threat to the environment, and can have no impact at all because it's chemically unreactive and forms no natural compounds (it can form an exotic compound with fluorine in the laboratory). No known ecological damage is caused by this element. Happy Trails!

NH3    2.05 ppm    1.17*10^-6 atm
Ammonia, boils at −33.34°C and freezes at −77.7°C (at 1atm) into white crystals. On your planet since the pressure is .573atm (58.06kPa), it will boil at around -44°C. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonia_(data_page)] The Permissible Exposure Limit for ammonia set by OSHA is 50 parts per million (ppm) averaged over an eight hour period. The odor detection level ranges from 5 to 53 ppm. At 30ppm you might want to wear a mask though. It causes eye irritation at around 110ppm, and they killed a cat with a tube directly inserted into its lungs with 1,000ppm. So, your planet is completely safe from Ammonia harm. Ammonia is also found throughout the Solar System on Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto, among other places: on smaller, icy worlds like Pluto, ammonia can act as a geologically important antifreeze, as a mixture of water and ammonia can potentially have a melting point of as low as 173°K if the ammonia concentration is high enough and thus allow such worlds to retain internal oceans and active geology far longer than would be possible with water alone. Another cool thing is your kidneys produce Ammonia to neutralize excess acid in your body.

Watsisname, I've noticed some of the gasses quoted are not on the 2nd post's list of gases on Page 1. Is it possible to add them to it? :)
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

18 Jul 2017 22:07

A few more I was working on for planets I found in the past. Feel free to use if you'd like.

CL : Chlorine
Chlorine is a toxic gas that attacks the respiratory system, eyes, and skin. Because it is denser than air, it tends to accumulate at the bottom of poorly ventilated spaces. Chlorine gas is a strong oxidizer, which may react with flammable materials. Ozone is destroyed by reactions with Chlorine, Bromine, Nitrogen, Hydrogen, and Oxygen gases. Reactions with these gases typically occurs through catalytic processes. A catalytic reaction cycle is a set of chemical reactions which result in the destruction of many ozone molecules while the molecule that started the reaction is reformed to continue the process. Because of catalytic reactions, an individual Chlorine atom can on average destroy nearly a thousand ozone molecules before it is converted into a form harmless to ozone. The toxicity of Chlorine comes from its oxidizing power. When Chlorine is inhaled at concentrations greater than 30 ppm, it reacts with water and cellular fluid, producing Hydrochloric Acid (HCl) and Hypochlorous Acid (HClO). Breathing lower concentrations can aggravate the respiratory system and exposure to the gas can irritate the eyes.   

Detectable with measuring devices in concentrations as low as 0.2 ppm, and by smell at 3 ppm.
Recommended exposure limit - 0.5 ppm over 15 minutes
Permissible exposure limit - 1 ppm
Immediately dangerous to life - 10 ppm
Coughing and vomiting may occur at 30 ppm and lung damage at 60 ppm.
Lethal concentrations - About 1000 ppm after a few deep breaths.

---------------------------------------

C2N2 : Cyanogen
Cyanogen, also (CN)2, has been observed in the atmosphere of Titan. Saturn's largest moon, and in the gases of interstellar nebulas. On Earth, it is used as a welding gas Cyanogen is a highly toxic compound, and in 1910 a spectroscopic analysis of Halley's Comet found cyanogen in the comet's tail. This led to public fear that the Earth would be poisoned as it passed through the tail. Because of the extremely diffuse nature of the tail, there was no effect when the planet passed through it.
Explosive limits     6.6–32%
Recommended exposure limit - Time Weighted Avg 10 ppm
Permissible exposure limit - NONE

-------------------------------------

CH2N2 : Diazomethane (Man Made)
In the pure form at room temperature, it is an extremely sensitive explosive yellow gas. Diazomethane is toxic by inhalation or by contact with the skin or eyes (TLV 0.2ppm). Symptoms include chest discomfort, headache, weakness and, in severe cases, collapse. Symptoms may be delayed. Deaths from diazomethane poisoning have been reported. In one instance a laboratory worker consumed a hamburger near a fumehood where he was generating a large quantity of diazomethane, and died four days later from fulminating pneumonia.
Recommended exposure limit - 0.2 ppm
Permissible exposure limit - 0.2 ppm
Immediately dangerous to life - 2 ppm
Lethal concentrations - 175 ppm (cat, 10 min)

---------------------------------------

NO2 : Nitrogen Dioxide
Recommended exposure limit - 1 ppm
Permissible exposure limit - 5 ppm
Immediately dangerous to life - 20 ppm
Lethal concentrations -
    30 ppm (guinea pig, 1 hr)
    315 ppm (rabbit, 15 min)
    64 ppm (dog, 8 hr)
    64 ppm (monkey, 8 hr)
    68 ppm (rat, 4 hr)
    138 ppm (rat, 30 min)
    1000 ppm (mouse, 10 min)

---------------------------------------

HCN : Hydrogen Cyanide
(2 CH4 + 2 NH3 + 3 O2 ? 2 HCN + 6 H2O).
HCN has been detected in the interstellar medium and in the atmospheres of carbon stars. Since then, extensive studies have probed formation and destruction pathways of HCN in various environments and examined its use as a tracer for a variety of astronomical species and processes. It has been postulated that Carbon from a cascade of asteroids, known as the Late Heavy Bombardment, resulting from interaction of Jupiter and Saturn, blasted the surface of young Earth and reacted with Nitrogen in Earth's atmosphere to form HCN. Hydrogen Cyanide has been discussed as a precursor to amino acids and nucleic acids, and is proposed to have played a part in the origin of life. Some millipedes release Hydrogen Cyanide as a defense mechanism. Some have shown that neurons can produce Hydrogen Cyanide upon activation of their opioid receptors by endogenous or exogenous opioids.)

Explosive limits - 5.6% – 40.0%
Permissible exposure limit - TWA 10 ppm [skin]
Recommended exposure limit - ST 4.7 ppm [skin]
Immediately dangerous to life - 50 ppm
Lethal Concentrations (median)
    501 ppm (rat, 5 min)
    323 ppm (mouse, 5 min)
    275 ppm (rat, 15 min)
    170 ppm (rat, 30 min)
    160 ppm (rat, 30 min)
    323 ppm (rat, 5 min)
Lethal Concentrations (lowest published)
    200 ppm (mammal, 5 min)
    36 ppm (mammal, 2 hr)
    107 ppm (human, 10 min)
    759 ppm (rabbit, 1 min)
    759 ppm (cat, 1 min)
    357 ppm (human, 2 min)
    179 ppm (human, 1 hr)
    > 2000 ppm will kill a human in about 1 minute.
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

20 Jul 2017 04:17

Some planets are non-toxic to breathe on, but don't have any Oxygen. Maybe just an O2 tank and a tube up your nostrils is all you need to survive.

Non-toxic Air.jpg


Some planets' atmospheres are Pure Oxygen, but usually with very thin air. You'd never make it here.

Pure O2.jpg


A few just might be possible to set up camp and take a break on after a long long long trip.
Just make sure you never leave the highest peak on the planet.

Breathable only at highest peak 1.jpg


Breathable only at highest peak 2.jpg


And then there is a rare few that you would possibly enjoy.
~ I introduce to you ~

Fahrtsmaug Five.jpg


Fahrtsmaug Five : RS 5510-1355-5-32353-102 B5

Atmospheric Analysis: .312atm total atmospheric pressure @ -102.07°C (-151.726°F)

Considered Habitable & Breathable with certain waivers required before embarking.

Unbearably cold, dry and wispy! Death Valleys are filled with CO2 & H2S. Pockets of Ethylene, Nitros Oxide & Helium gas are everywhere, that cause a numbing, euphoric, & high-pitched laughter, respectively. Areas with Xenon & Krypton will lower the pitch of your voice. Methane pockets usually put an end to, or start the uncontrollable laughing all over again. Plus lots of fuel and hydrocarbons to refuel the campers and RVs. All-in-all, it certainly makes for one a Hell of a picnic place!~
------------------------------
O2    73.9%    .231atm
Oxygen, the optimal breathing range is between 19.5% and 23.5% at 1atm.
The lowest tolerable pressure of breathable air (21% of O2) is about 0.47 atm.
Oxygen toxicity occurs with exposure to concentrations greater than 50% at 1 atm.
Pure oxygen can be used for up to 3 hours at 1 atm & 1 hour at 3 atm of pressure.
Which means on this planet, the pressure is perfect but the concentration is too high.
You could tolerate if for about 17 to 18 hours.  Unless you stay well above sea level.

CO2    25.6%    .0798atm
Carbon Dioxide at this level will cause impaired hearing, nausea, vomiting, and loss of consciousness within minutes to an hour. Unless you stay well above sea level.

CH4    0.394%    .00123atm
Methane, about 10% of a fart is composed of Methane. Non-toxic, yet the silent ones are the deadliest ones. An asphyxiant and may displace oxygen in an enclosed space, particularly elevators. Extremely flammable and may form explosive air mixtures with the light of a single match, if positioned properly.

C2H4     755ppm     .000236atm
Ethylene, an asphyxiant and combustible. A non-carcinogen. Inhalatory anaesthetic produces states of euphoria. There is no evidence to indicate that prolonged exposure to low concentrations of ethylene will result in chronic effects. Sponges are normally used to deliver a dose. Prolonged inhalation of about 85% in oxygen is slightly toxic, resulting in a slow fall in the blood pressure; at about 94% in oxygen, ethylene is acutely fatal.
    
C2H2    389ppm    .000122atm
Acetylene, might be solid at low temperatures, at 1 atm. Very small temperature and pressure window to remain as a liquid.
    2500 ppm     recommended exposure limit

H2S     178 ppm    5.57*10^-5atm
Hydrogen sulfide, may be tolerated indefinitely at very low levels. Chronic exposure to low levels around 2 ppm has been implicated in miscarriage and reproductive health issues.  
    100–150 ppm     olfactory nerve is paralyzed after a few inhalations.
    320–530 ppm     leads to pulmonary edema with the possibility of death.

C2H6     49 ppm     1.53*10^-5 atm
Ethane, an asphyxiant and combustible. A non-carcinogen.

Ar    44.4 ppm    1.39*10^-5 atm
Argon, an asphyxiant, colorless, odorless, and tasteless.

CO    29.3 ppm    9.15*10^-6 atm
Carbon monoxide, the silent killer, colorless, odorless, and tasteless.
    0.1 ppm     natural atmosphere level .
    0.5–5 ppm     average level in homes.
    5–15 ppm     level in homes with gas stoves, or vehicle exhaust emissions.
    17 ppm     atmosphere on Venus.
    100–200 ppm     exhaust level from automobiles in Mexico City around 1975.

He    6.5ppm    2.03*10^-6atm
Helium, an asphyxiant but non-toxic. Plays no biological role and is found in trace amounts in human blood. The speed of sound in helium is nearly three times the speed of sound in air. Because the fundamental frequency of a gas-filled cavity is proportional to the speed of sound in the gas, when helium is inhaled there is a corresponding increase in the resonant frequencies of the vocal tract.

N2     .845ppm    2.64*10^-7atm
Nitrous Oxide, at room temperature, it is a colorless, odorless non-flammable gas, with a slightly sweet taste. It is used in surgery and dentistry for its anaesthetic and analgesic effects. It is known as "laughing gas" due to the euphoric effects of inhaling it, a property that has led to its recreational use as a dissociative anaesthetic.

Kr    .463ppm    1.45*10^-7atm
Krypton, an asphyxiant but non-toxic. The velocity of sound in a denser-than-air gas, such as krypton, is about 200m/s. The speed of sound in air is about 330m/s, therefore the frequency of sound in krypton is almost 0.6 times lower than the frequency in air, or not entirely one octave lower. A normal man's voice will sound like the Star Wars character Darth Vader.

Ne    .282ppm    8.81*10^-8atm
Neon, on Earth it occurs at around 18.2ppm. Chemically unreactive and forms no natural compounds. No known ecological damage is caused by this element.

C3H8    .182ppm    5.68*10^-8atm
Propane, fuel for BBQ grills and lots more. Denser than air, it may accumulate in low spaces and near the floor. When abused as an inhalant, it may cause hypoxia (lack of oxygen), pneumonia, or cardiac failure or arrest. Propane has low toxicity since it is not readily absorbed and is not biologically active.
Permissible exposure limit with time weighted average
    1000 ppm
Recommended exposure limit with time weighted average
    1000 ppm
Immediate danger
    2100 ppm

Xe    .115ppm    3.58*10^-8atm
Xenon, the heaviest non-radioactive noble gas. It affects your voice like Sulphur Hexafluoride and can get you high like Nitrous Oxide.
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elemental
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

20 Jul 2017 04:57

Wow, can't wait to pack my bags and set off! (Who is joining the trip lol?)
As for myself, I haven't found any breathables yet, anyone would like to share your search strategy? An advice would be very much appreciated since I really want to discover a habitable planet, preferably a terra, not a desert.
 
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Starlight Glimmer
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

20 Jul 2017 11:24

Well. Usually I just search for deserts with life. If a planet has no life than the atmosphere will not be breatheable. 
 
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Watsisname
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

20 Jul 2017 14:12

Gnargenox wrote:

A+ name. :P

elemental, the trick is to be able to search a lot of planets quickly and with the highest probability of success.  For that I'll choose:

System's main star = 'main sequence', 'any', 'any' 
Sun count = 1  (I find it takes longer if you need to swap between multiple stars in a system to check them.)

Object Parameters:  Any terra (or desert or oceania).  You can also choose a temperature class if you want to be more specific.
Atmosphere box checked, range between 0.12 and 1.5atm.  (Flexible of course, but I find this range works pretty well.)
Organic life = unicellular or multicellular (It's quicker to find and check a planet if it has life on it, since that highlights it in green)
Exotic life = doesn't matter

In my experience it is a lot easier to find breathable atmospheres on cold deserts than temperate terras.  Out of many hundreds of temperate terras, I have only so far found one that was survivable for about an hour.  Cold deserts seem to have a better chance of having a high oxygen concentration and smaller amounts of everything else.
 
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PlutonianEmpire
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Planets with potentially breathable atmospheres

20 Jul 2017 17:13

Can custom planets be posted here too? Or is that better off being done in a different thread?
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