Page 8 of 30

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 16 Apr 2018 15:37
by HarbingerDawn
Mr. Abner wrote:
Source of the post Will ringlight be happening with .9.9.0?

No

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 22 Apr 2018 09:20
by Macronicus
Do Carbonia, Ferria and Aquaria planets look any different from Terra planets?

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 22 Apr 2018 13:40
by TheRedstoneHive
Macronicus wrote:
Do Carbonia, Ferria and Aquaria planets look any different from Terra planets?

I think those can be a sub-class of Terra or Super Terra etc. Terra is basically just a rocky planet like Venus Earth and Mars.

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 22 Apr 2018 14:38
by Macronicus
TheRedstoneHive wrote:
Macronicus wrote:
Do Carbonia, Ferria and Aquaria planets look any different from Terra planets?

I think those can be a sub-class of Terra or Super Terra etc. Terra is basically just a rocky planet like Venus Earth and Mars.


I'll have to wait and see.

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 22 Apr 2018 17:12
by HarbingerDawn
Macronicus wrote:
Source of the post Do Carbonia, Ferria and Aquaria planets look any different from Terra planets?

The appearance of different planets has not been finalized yet, but carbonias, ferrias, and terras should all look pretty much the same.

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 22 Apr 2018 18:18
by Macronicus
HarbingerDawn wrote:
Macronicus wrote:
Source of the post Do Carbonia, Ferria and Aquaria planets look any different from Terra planets?

The appearance of different planets has not been finalized yet, but carbonias, ferrias, and terras should all look pretty much the same.


Well that's kinda disappointing. Oh well.

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 23 Apr 2018 04:50
by HarbingerDawn
Macronicus wrote:
Source of the post Well that's kinda disappointing.

The objective of SE is realism. Objects like that wouldn't look significantly different from each other except in extreme cases.

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 23 Apr 2018 05:55
by Macronicus
HarbingerDawn wrote:
Macronicus wrote:
Source of the post Well that's kinda disappointing.

The objective of SE is realism. Objects like that wouldn't look significantly different from each other except in extreme cases.


Yet we haven't even seen if carbon planets even exist.

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 23 Apr 2018 08:25
by HarbingerDawn
Macronicus wrote:
Source of the post Yet we haven't even seen if carbon planets even exist.

Carbonias are just planets with a relatively high ratio of carbon to oxygen in their chemical composition. This means that their rocks will contain more carbonates and carbides than on a planet like Earth, and will also likely have higher concentrations of carbon-based volatiles than Earth.

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 23 Apr 2018 09:42
by Cosmic_Dreams
Macronicus wrote:
Do Carbonia, Ferria and Aquaria planets look any different from Terra planets?

There might be subtle differences in planets with varying chemical compositions but the biggest factor in the appearance of a planet, more specifically its coloration, is the type of light its host star is emitting. This will most likely be especially true with planets covered with life as vegetation will evolve to absorb as much sunlight as possible and the typical color most vegetation takes on will vary depending on star type. I know that most vegetation on Earth being green is a response to the color of light from our sun, although I forget the exact mechanisms why. I think theorists have an idea for what a living world might look like from space for every known star type.

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 23 Apr 2018 09:53
by Gnargenox
Is "Telluric" a consideration to describe Terra like planets and the various rocky subtypes (Terra, Carbonia, Ferria, Oceania)

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 23 Apr 2018 13:31
by HarbingerDawn
Cosmic_Dreams wrote:
Source of the post vegetation will evolve to absorb as much sunlight as possible

Not necessarily true, otherwise we wouldn't have green plants on Earth. The Sun radiates most strongly in the green part of the spectrum, so reflecting more green light than anything else wouldn't make any sense, yet that's what happens. If it was just about absorbing as much light as possible, and if that was an evolutionary inevitability, then all plants would be black. The reality is far more complex.

Work progress 0.9.8.1 = 0.9.9.0

Posted: 24 Apr 2018 12:26
by Jimlarck
Are there any planned streams to show off the current progress of SE? Also, I'm sure it's been asked before but I can't find it anywhere, but will 0.9.9 have a steam release?

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 24 Apr 2018 13:38
by Cosmic_Dreams
HarbingerDawn wrote:
Cosmic_Dreams wrote:
Source of the post vegetation will evolve to absorb as much sunlight as possible

Not necessarily true, otherwise we wouldn't have green plants on Earth. The Sun radiates most strongly in the green part of the spectrum, so reflecting more green light than anything else wouldn't make any sense, yet that's what happens. If it was just about absorbing as much light as possible, and if that was an evolutionary inevitability, then all plants would be black. The reality is far more complex.

I see. I could have sworn though at the very least the color of the sun and the color of vegetation on earth being green were intertwined somehow and that the science behind it also allowed us to make a general assumption of the average dominant color of vegetation on a earth like world around a different star type. Alot of what I know though I learn though alot of those space shows on History channel like The Universe and YouTube channels like Vsauce, so most of what I learn is simplified and generalized enough so it's easier to understand for average people and people like me who study science at an amateur level.

General 0.9.9.0 Discussion

Posted: 24 Apr 2018 15:25
by Gnargenox
The energy of a single photon of light is inversely proportional to its wavelength, with the visible region of the spectrum having less energy per photon than the ultraviolet region, and more than the infrared region. The energy of the visible spectrum increases from the red wavelengths through the blue and violet. Ultraviolet light, which has more energy than blue light, does not support photosynthesis. If it did reach the earth’s surface, ultraviolet light would be energetic enough to break carbon-carbon bonds. The bond-breaking process would lead to a net loss of fixed carbon as biomolecules were broken apart. Fortunately, the ozone layer in the atmosphere absorbs enough UV radiation to prevent this from occurring.

Not all wavelengths of light can support photosynthesis. The photosynthetic action spectrum depends on the type of accessory pigments present. For example, in green plants, the action spectrum resembles the absorption spectrum for chlorophylls and carotenoids with peaks for violet-blue and red light. In red algae, the action spectrum overlaps with the absorption spectrum of phycobilins for red blue-green light, which allows these algae to grow in deeper waters that filter out the longer wavelengths used by green plants.

In the light reactions, one molecule of the pigment chlorophyll absorbs one photon and loses one electron. This electron is passed to a modified form of chlorophyll called pheophytin, which passes the electron to a quinone molecule, allowing the start of a flow of electrons down an electron transport chain that leads to the ultimate reduction of NADP to NADPH. In addition, this creates a proton gradient across the chloroplast membrane; its dissipation is used by ATP synthase for the concomitant synthesis of ATP. The chlorophyll molecule regains the lost electron from a water molecule through a process called photolysis, which releases a dioxygen (O2) molecule. The overall equation for the light-dependent reactions under the conditions of non-cyclic electron flow in green plants is:

2 H2O + 2 NADP+ + 3 ADP + 3 Pi + light → 2 NADPH + 2 H+ + 3 ATP + O2

Molecules that have double bonds alternating with single bonds have a sort of resonance (conjugation) that allows electrons to move more freely over a large portion of the molecule (sort of like how metals have more free moving electrons). This ability of electrons to move freely lowers the energy difference between the HOMO and the LUMO (somehow) which allows photons of lower energy (and therefore lower wavelengths) to make electrons jump to higher energy levels. The rule of thumb tends to be the more conjugated pi bonds the lower the wavelength required to make this energy level jump occur. In chlorophyll specifically, there is a porphyrin-metal system at the center of the molecule which causes there to be several different HOMO-LUMO gaps which result in a major absorption peak in the blue light range (the soret band) and several peaks in the red range (q bands).

Why did evolution end up doing it this way? Probably because it is the simplest, and even if not the most efficient, it is still 90% efficient at moving elections. Almost all the photons that fall on the chloroplast are absorbed and can provide energy for synthesis. One hypothesis I have read is that the early dominance of Archaea (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaea) with green dominant absorption of solar radiation lead to the red/blue chlorophyl development as it allowed them to coexist without competing for the same resources.

Perhaps there is a different way to move electrons, but to me it seems the physics of reality and how chemicals work lead to the conclusion, you will most likely find vegetative materials that use sunlight as energy, as appearing green, no matter what the host star color looks.