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Mosfet
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New planet classification

26 Jul 2017 14:59

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post deserty = Xeric

hahah! I like when I learn new scientific terms. Botanic terms, right? I see them also in italian. Xeric, mesic and hydric: very dry,  moisty, extremely moisty.

JCandeias wrote:
Source of the post Maybe dry ices would be a good designation for all those cryo-ices in other languages as well?

mmh, dry ice as far as I know is used exclusively for CO2, using it for other compounds could lead to wrong assumptions regarding the composition. Cryo-vulcans being called dry-vulcans could infer CO2 lava flows, when it could be something else.
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alfa015
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26 Jul 2017 15:30

HarbingerDawn wrote:
Some exoplanets (atmosphere and surface classes are fake of course)






















































Kepler-10 btorrid airless pyrooceanic rocky superterratorrid tidally locked rocky superterra with magma oceans
COROT-7 btorrid hypobaric pyrooceanic rocky superferriatorrid tidally locked rocky superferria with magma oceans
55 Cancri etorrid hypobaric pyrooceanic carbid supercarboniatorrid tidally locked carbid supercarbonia with magma oceans
51 Pegasi btorrid jupitertorrid tidally locked gas giant
TRAPPIST-1 bwarm hypobaric desertic rocky terrawarm tidally locked rocky terra
TRAPPIST-1 cwarm hyperbaric desertic rocky ferriawarm tidally locked rocky ferria
TRAPPIST-1 dtemperate mesobaric laky rocky terratemperate tidally locked rocky terra with water lakes
TRAPPIST-1 etemperate mesobaric oceanic watery terratemperate tidally locked rocky terra with water seas
TRAPPIST-1 fcool mesobaric oceanic watery aquariacool tidally locked oceania
TRAPPIST-1 gcool hyperbaric glacial icy terracool tidally locked rocky terra with water glaciers
TRAPPIST-1 hcold mesobaric icy aquariacold tidally locked icy glacia
Kepler-22 btemperate ultrabaric watery aquariatemperate oceania
HD 10180 ctorrid neptunetorrid tidally locked ice giant
HD 10180 hcool jupitercool gas giant
Proxima bcool glacial rocky terracool tidally locked rocky terra with water glaciers
Kepler-52 btorrid chthoniatorrid tidally locked chthonia
GD 66 bcold chthoniacold chthonia
Osiristorrid subjupitertorrid gas giant


nice, but i would say proxima b is temperate
Last edited by alfa015 on 27 Jul 2017 06:50, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Mosfet
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26 Jul 2017 15:53

alfa015 wrote:
Source of the post nice, buy i would say proxima b is temperate

We still don't know if there's an atmosphere, that's only one of possible scenarios. Cirax did some nice propositions about it.
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JCandeias
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26 Jul 2017 16:00

Mosfet wrote:
Source of the post Cryo-vulcans being called dry-vulcans could infer CO2 lava flows, when it could be something else.

I'm not suggesting to change the terminology regarding cryovolcanism, mind you: that's a well-established term and shouldn't be changed.
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Mosfet
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26 Jul 2017 16:10

Oh, no, I just wanted to use an analogy, sorry.
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26 Jul 2017 21:45

Normobaric is the term for air pressure at sea level on Earth, rather than mesobaric.
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27 Jul 2017 03:27

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post Normobaric is the term for air pressure at sea level on Earth, rather than mesobaric.

Mesobaric isn't being used to specifically describe Earth sea level pressure in this case, so it's appropriate.
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Julian
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27 Jul 2017 13:27

SpaceEngineer wrote:
I don't like "jovian" and "neptunian", because they are adjectives. This will make my grammar code even more complicated. And then we must change "terra" to "terrestrial" as well as and all other classes.

In Russian, is it possible to use the same noun for "a person from Jupiter" to mean "a planet like Jupiter"? They would both be "jovian" in English and the Romance languages.
 
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27 Jul 2017 14:00

Julian wrote:
Source of the post In Russian, is it possible to use the same noun for "a person from Jupiter" to mean "a planet like Jupiter"? They would both be "jovian" in English and the Romance languages.

It is possible, but not used in literature. We using either terms "gas giant" or "jupiter". For terrestrial planets, "earth-like" is used sometimes, but I never saw a "jupiter-like" term.
 
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27 Jul 2017 20:44

I think "earth-like" is overused, IMO. "Earth-like" should really just refer to terras with bodies of water, with or without life. In my mind, "Earth-like" implies a planet that is at least somewhat habitable by Earth standards, rather than a venusian desert with crushingly high g's and thick toxic air.
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28 Jul 2017 04:02

I told about Russian. Word "землеподобный" cold be translated literally as "earth-like", but corresponds in sense with "terrestrial" ("rocky planet"). This is for question by Julian.
 
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Zymoox
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30 Jul 2017 02:51

Firstly, I thought about an alternative to "jupiter" and "neptune". What do you think about the terms "Neptunia" and "Jovia"?

Also, I found some translation problems to Spanish of several terms.

- "Airless" can only be "sin aire", which are two words.
- "Biohazardous" doesn't have a direct translation. It might be "biopeligroso", but it wouldn't be quite right.
- Neither does "laky" have a translation. I could think of the term "lagoso", but sounds funny.

Apart from that, most of the problems (with gramatical gender, word order, etc) can be solved, as shown in previous posts.
 
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Mosfet
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30 Jul 2017 06:36

Zymoox wrote:
Source of the post Neither does "laky" have a translation. I could think of the term "lagoso", but sounds funny

if laky should really be lacustrine, "pertaining to lakes", shouldn't the term "lacustre" cover this, same as italian?
Italian also doesn't have a single word for "airless", I toyed a bit with alpha privative forms like anaerobic, they just don't convey the exact meaning. Well I guess for some languages there's no escape.
Same for "Biohazardous". Biohazard is translated with Biorischio but the adjective form doesn't exist, substituted by "biotossico". Interestingly the seemingly same "biotoxic" has another meaning.
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Zymoox
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30 Jul 2017 07:28

Mosfet wrote:
if laky should really be lacustrine, "pertaining to lakes", shouldn't the term "lacustre" cover this, same as italian?


"Lacustre" sounds somewhat obscure in Spanish; but you're right, it's the correct term.

Also, I think I have some alternatives to "biopeligroso". You see, in English that word should means "harmful to life", but in Spanish it's more like "potentially harmful to life".
So I thought about making up words to show the original meaning. I got "biodañino" and "bionocivo" (lit. 'bioharmful')
 
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Frostbreath
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30 Jul 2017 08:28

I suggest keeping the terms effective yet simple. E.g. "very hot" over "torrid". If you want your audience/player base as broad as possible (to put an example: I still love to use SE to educate primary school students), people should be able to at least understand the majority of the terms used. I like to see SE being directed to scientists, but also to those who want to indulge themselves into the vastness of space, but are not as familiar with the quite difficult terms used.

TL;DR: keeps terms accessible, don't go too big on using difficult words. Or maybe use an option between scientific and "common" terms.

That being said, I do like the proposal of the new classification system, as long as it's kept accessible to everyone using/playing SE.
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