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SpaceEngineer
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New planet classification

22 Jul 2017 09:01

Recently HarbingerDawn and I have been working on a new planet classification system for SE. Our goal is to have a classification system which meets several criteria:

- Being physically based. Class name must reveal the most important properties of a planet: it's size, bulk composition, surface conditions.
- Must describe all known planet types and theoretical ones, like carbon and chthonic planets.
- Being descriptive. No abstract Star Trek-style classes M, F, G etc. Class name must immediately give the user information about the basic nature of a planet. I mean that it must be a set of words, like in the current SE classification: "temperate terra with life".
- But the description also cannot be too long.
- Class names must be single-word. One can use "very hot" instead of "scorched", but we must try to avoid this, to reduce confusion and makes description more compact.
- Class names must have a scientific style. I.e. using Latin/Greek prefixes "hypo-", "meso-", "cryo-" is a good choice. Also, "terra", "selena" etc.

There are several alternate classification schemes which we have developed, and I started to implement some of them in the code. I hope your suggestions in this thread will help us to select the best one. It is very important to make this classification readable and nice-sounding in other languages. So if you are not an English speaker, try to translate the classnames in your mind, and write here if you find some issues. We shall try to change words/scheme to satisfy all languages. At least to avoid ridiculous combinations :)

So the planet description is made by combining several class names:
- temperature class
- atmosphere class (atmosphere pressure + breathability)
- surface volatiles class (volatiles composition, amount and physical state)
- surface bedrock composition class
- size class
- bulk composition class
- additional info (tidal locked, life etc)

Some classes could be skipped entirely, to make the description more compact. Example layouts:

"temp_class atmo_class [additional] volatiles_class surface_class size_class bulk_class".
Earth: "temperate mesobaric inhabited marine rocky terra"
Mars: "cool hypobaric hypoglacial rocky subterra"
Titan: "frigid mesobaric cryolaky icy subaquaria"

"temp_class volatiles_class surface_class size_class bulk_class [additional]".
Earth: "temperate marine rocky terra with life"
Mars: "cool hypoglacial rocky subterra"
Titan: "frigid mesobaric cryolaky icy subaquaria"

"temp_class surface_class size_class bulk_class [with volatiles_class] [with/and additional]".
Earth: "temperate rocky terra with water seas and life"
Mars: "cool rocky subterra with CO2 glaciers"
Titan: "frigid icy subaquaria with hydrocarbon lakes"

First, I'll describe the bulk and size classes, because they are the most important.

Bulk class
Describes the bulk composition of a planet, i.e. the major substance forming the planet.
terra - rocky planet (combined old terra, desert and selena classes)
aquaria - water/ice planet (combined old oceania, ice world and titan classes)
carbonia - carbon/carbid/diamond planet (new class, hypothetical carbon-dominated planet)
ferria - iron/metal planet (new class, hypothetical)
neptune - ice giant planet
jupiter - gas giant planet
chthonia - core of an evaporated ice/gas giant, or a helium-rich giant (not sure about this class)
asteroid - for asteroids, comets and dwarf moons (irregularly-shaped small bodies)

The terra class could use the alternate class name earth. The reason for this is making classification closer to modern astronomy. In SE you sometimes visit a large terrestrial planets, which will be called "superearth" - matching the astronomical term (see below).

The aquaria class could use the alternate class name: oceania or glacia/cryogenia, depending on temperature. Because frozen oceania (= ice world) will sound strange, as will warm glacia (molten, = oceania). But this is not a very good solution, because it adds messiness to the classification, and also some uncertainty exists: imagine a tidally locked planet, which have a global water ocean on a day side and a global ice glacier on a night side (TRAPPIST-1 f). What would you call it, oceania or glacia? Also, "glacia" does not have a good translation to Russian.

The ferria class could use alternate names: ironia, metallica, but they sound funny :) Also, ferrum in Latin means "iron" - I think it is suitable class name, to continue the pattern (terra - ground, aqua - water, carbo - coal).

The neptune and jupiter classes alternatively could be named "ice giant" and "gas giant". But it has two drawbacks: first, it makes a double-word class name, which I want to avoid (like getting rid of old "ice world" class). This also makes some trouble with adding a size class prefix (see below). Second, using the word "neptune" removes annoying questions like "how can an ice giant be hot". Also, "neptune" and "jupiter" are commonly used class names in modern astronomy.

By the way, I made an option to switch between these alternate class names for developing and debug usage. I simply can leave it in the release as a config file parameter or even a switch in the settings menu. So you could switch "jupiter" back to "gas giant" if you like.

Size class
It is proposed as a simple prefix to the bulk class:
mega - huge
super - big
(no prefix) - normal
sub - small
mini - little
micro - tiny

Examples: superterra, subaquaria, minineptune.

More specifically, this is a mass class, not size. Because mass is more important, it defines how match matter forms the planet; size (radius) depends not only on mass, but also on chemical (bulk) composition.

Possible subdivision between classes for solid planets, in Earth masses:
<2*10-6 (micro), 2*10-6-0.0002 (mini), 0.0002-0.02 (sub), 0.02-2 (no prefix), 2-20 (super), >20 (mega)
<2*10-6 (micro), 2*10-6-0.0002 (mini), 0.0002-0.02 (sub), 0.02-2 (no prefix), 2-10 (super), >10 (mega) - more corresponds to a scientific definition of superearth (2-20 Earth masses)

Alternate, "natural" (logarithmic). Earth in this system will be "superterra", not very nice... Shifting it by a factor of 2 is better.
<0.0001 (micro), 0.0001-0.001 (mini), 0.001-0.01 (sub), 0.01-0.1 (no prefix), 0.1-1 (super), >1 (mega)

Examples:
Kepler-10b - superterra (superearth)
Kepler-10c - megaterra? (17 Earth masses)
Earth, Venus - terra
Mars - terra (because it is > 0.02 Earth masses)
Mercury - ferria (it has an iron core 60% by mass, the whole planet is also > 0.02 Earth masses)
Moon, Io - subterra (they are < 0.02 Earth masses)
Ceres - miniterra (Ceres is rocky, it has ice as a relatively thin mantle, 25% by mass)
Europa - subterra (it is also a rocky world, the ice and subsurface water ocean is just 10% of its mass)
Ganymede, Titan - aquaria (they are by 50% composed of water, and also fall into the "no prefix" class due to mass > 0.02 Earth masses)
Callisto - subaquaria (it is < 0.02 Earth masses)

Gas giants (jupiters) must use a different scale. Possible subdivision in Earth masses:
<6 (mini), 6-60 (sub), 60-600 (no prefix), >600 (super)
The same in Jupiter masses:
<0.02 (mini), 0.02-0.2 (sub), 0.2-2 (no prefix), >2 (super)

For ice giants (neptunes), I'm not sure about the subdivision. One possible way (in Earth masses):
6-10 (sub), 10-40 (no prefix), >40 (super)
The same in Jupiter masses:
0.02-0.03 (sub), 0.03-0.13 (no prefix), >0.13 (super)

6 Earth masses is the theoretical subdivision limit between rocky planets and planets with a large gaseous atmosphere (so-called mini-neptunes), so is a good choice for the classification. But in our classification they must be called sub-neptunes, to save the "sub - (no prefix) - super" scheme. Super-neptunes are very rare transitional planets with a mass of ~60 Earth masses, similar to those of a very lightweight gas giants, but still not having the metallic hydrogen layer. Presence of metallic hydrogen is a natural physical criteria to distinguish "true" gas giants from other planets.

An example of a mini-neptune (or subneptune in our scheme) is Kepler-11f: 2.3 Mearth and 2.6 Rearth. It could be classified as a superearth or superaquaria with a large atmosphere though, so subneptune class could be omitted. Subdivision line between aquaria (icy/water planet) and neptune (icy planet with a H/He atmosphere) is not very sharp. Considering this, one could exclude the ice giants class at all - they are the same as "mega-aquaria" (>10 or >20 Mearth). But "ice giant/neptune" is the commonly used term in astronomy...

Alternatively, ice and gas giants could be merged into a single "giant" class. Then we could use this scheme (in Earth masses):
<6 (mini), 6-60 (sub), 60-600 (no prefix), >600 (super)
or the same in Jupiter masses:
<0.02 (mini), 0.02-0.2 (sub), 0.2-2 (no prefix), >2 (super)
This scaleis beautifully monotonic, but not physically-based. We omitted the criterion of the presence of metallic hydrogen. Use this for "true" gas giants only, and merge neptunes with aquaria?

Asteroids should use either different size scheme, or even omit it (call them just "asteroid", not depending on size/mass). HarbingerDawn proposed to use the same class names as for terrestrial planets for a large asteroids with differentiated interiors (thus Vesta will be microterra), and call other asteroids "asteroid" (without size class). In my system, asteroids are bodies with irregular shape smaller than 300 km (rocky) or 200 km (icy).

Temperature class
Describes temperature on a planet's surface, or equilibrium temperature for gas giants. Could be changed to equilibrium temperature for all planets, but this will make Venus and Earth in the cool class...
scorched - hot - warm - temperate - cool - cold - frozen (like in SE now)
scorched - hot - warm - temperate - cool - cold - cryogenic (like in the SE translation to Russian now)
torrid - hot - warm - temperate - cool - cold - frigid (HarbingerDawn's proposal, but the word "frigid" has a ridiculous translation to Russian)
very hot - hot - warm - temperate - cool - cold - very cold (satisfies Russian language, and removes the word "cryogenic", which could conflict with other class names; but I want to avoid double words in the class name)
The temperature ranges which are used in SE now are:
>800K (scorched), 800-400K (hot), 400-300K (warm), 300-250K (temperate), 250-200K (cool), 200-100K (cold), 100K-0K (frozen)

Atmosphere pressure class
Describes the pressure range of the atmosphere. This class name is not used for gas giants, because they all will be ultrabaric/megabaric.
airless - infrabaric - hypobaric - mesobaric - hyperbaric - ultrabaric
Proposed pressure range (in atmospheres/bars):
0-10-6 (airless) - 10-6-10-3 (infrabaric) - 10-3-10-1 (hypobaric) - 10-1-101 (mesobaric) - 101-103 (hyperbaric) - >103 (ultrabaric)
Thus Venus would be hyperbaric, Earth - mesobaric, Mars - hypobaric, Pluto - infrabaric.

Another interesting option is using the metric system prefixes to describe the atmospheric pressure: milli-, kilo- etc:
airless - nanobaric - microbaric - millibaric - centibaric - decibaric - unibaric - decabaric - hectobaric - kilobaric - megabaric
10-9-10-6 (nanobaric) - 10-6-0.001 (microbaric) - 0.001-0.01 (millibaric) - 0.01-0.1 (centibaric) - 0.1-1 (decibaric) - 1-10 (unibaric) - 10-100 (decabaric) - 100-1000 (hectobaric) - 1000-106 (kilobaric) - >106 (megabaric)
But this system has some problems. First is using exact "1.0" borders makes Earth with 1.0 atm pressure - unibaric, but a planet with 0.999 atm pressure - decibaric (because its atmospheric pressure is 9.99 decibars). Second is it produces too many classes. One can skip centi-, deci-, deca- and hecto-, but then the first problem became even worse: if Earth is unibaric, then planet with 0.999 atm will be millibaric (999 millibars).

We decided to remove the atmo pressure class from the description, to make it more compact (see below).

Atmosphere breathability class
We did not consider this much. If we were going to remove the atmo pressure class, this would be useless anyway.
toxic - unbreathable - breathable - bio-hazardous

Additional info
tidally-locked - volcanic - cryovolcanic - cometary - inhabited
Some planets could have these subclasses, some could not, depending on a planet properties. They also could be combined, for example "tidally-locked cometary jupiter" (evaporating planet). But this is not a good way, because it generates double-wording again. The class "inhabited" could be used here instead of a suffix "with life" in the end of description, like in SE 0.9.8.0.

Volatiles class
This is a double/triple-word class, describing volatiles (liquids) composition, their amount and state, which could be combined into a single word. Volatiles are substances which are in liquid form on a planetary surface - forming lakes, seas and oceans, or in a partially frozen form - forming glaciers, which still could evaporate (like water glaciers on Earth, carbon dioxide on Mars and nitrogen on Pluto). This class name is not used for gas giants.

Volatiles composition
lava/magma - water - carbon dioxide/CO2 - ammonia - methane/hydrocarbons - nitrogen (countless of them... some planets could have multiple volatiles, which makes this system too difficult)
pyro - thermo - (none) - hypo - cryo (more simple option, describing only the temperature range of a liquid; see examples below)

Volatiles amount
desertic/arid - laky - marine - oceanic
desertic/arid - laky - marine - oceanic - superoceanic (for a planets with a global 100 km deep ocean)
desertic/arid - laky - marine - oceanic - superoceanic - glacial (for a planets with glaciers, for example Pluto has nitrogen glaciers)
If we are decided to omit the atmosphere class, we could add the "airless" here as a volatiles amount class. Airless bodies couldn't have liquids on their surfaces, so always will be "desertic". They could have glaciers though...

Examples:
Venus - desertic terra (so simple :) )
Earth - water-marine terra / (none-)marine terra
Moon - airless subterra
Mars - CO2-glacial + water-glacial terra / hypoglacial terra (as you can see, the first option is too messy)
Io - magma-laky subterra / pyrolaky subterra (Io has lava lakes)
Titan - hydrocarbons-laky aquaria / cryolaky aquaria (first option is not very precise, because Titan's lakes are composed of hydrocarbons and liquid nitrogen)
Pluto - nitrogen-glacial + CO-glacial subaquaria / cryoglacial subaquaria
Kepler-10b - magma-oceanic superterra / pyrooceanic superterra (example of a molten planet)

Alternate scheme (HarbingerDawn): add a description "with xxx" to the end of a planet class.
Volatiles composition:
lava/magma - water - carbon dioxide - ammonia - methane/hydrocarbons - nitrogen
Volatiles amount:
lakes - seas - oceans
lakes - seas - oceans - glaciers (combined with volatiles state)
Volatiles state:
liquid - glacial

Examples:
Earth - terra with water seas / terra with liquid water
Mars - terra with CO2 glaciers and water glaciers / terra with glacial CO2 and glacial water (oh... we probably must left only CO2 description - as the most prominent volatile on Martian surface)
Io - subterra with magma lakes / subterra with liquid magma
Titan - aquaria with hydrocarbons lakes / aquaria with liquid hydrocarbons
Pluto - subaquaria with nitrogen glaciers / subaquaria with glacial nitrogen
Kepler-10b - superterra with magma oceans / superterra with liquid magma

Surface class
Describes the main bedrock substance. Is not used for gas giants.
metallic - rocky - carbid - icy - watery

Examples:
Earth - rocky terra
snowball Earth - rocky terra
Europa - icy subterra
Hypothetical ocean planet - watery aquaria / watery terra (depending on its bulk composition)
Hypothetical carbon planet - carbid carbonia (carbon planet are theorized to have rocks made of carid instead of silicates)
Hypothetical metal planet - metallic ferria
 
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SpaceEngineer
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New planet classification

22 Jul 2017 09:44

Final examples (SpaceEnginer's with atmo class, HarbingerDawn's without atmo class, and alternate class names).

Solar system

Mercuryhot airless rocky ferriahot rocky ferria
Venushot hyperbaric desertic rocky terrahot volcanic rocky terra
Earthtemperate inhabited mesobaric marine rocky terratemperate volcanic rocky terra with water seas and life
Moontemperate airless rocky subterratemperate rocky subterra
Marscool hypobaric hypoglacial rocky terracool rocky terra with CO2 glaciers
4 Vestacold airless rocky superasteroidcold rocky miniterra
1 Cerescold airless icy miniterracold rocky miniglacia
16 Psychecold airless metallic asteroidcold metallic microferria
Jupitercold jupitercold gas giant
Iocold volcanic infrabaric pyrolaky rocky subterracold volcanic rocky subterra with magma lakes
Europacold airless icy subterracold icy subterra
Ganymedecold airless icy aquariacold icy glacia
Callistocold airless icy subaquariacold icy subglacia
Saturncold jupitercold gas giant
Enceladusfrigid airless cryovolcanic icy miniaquariafrigid volcanic icy microglacia
Tethyscold airless icy miniaquariacold icy miniglacia
Titanfrigid mesobaric cryolaky icy aquariafrigid icy glacia with hydrocarbon lakes
Iapetuscold airless icy miniaquariacold icy miniglacia
2060 Chironfrigid airless cometary icy superasteroidfrigid cometary icy asteroid
Uranusfrigid neptunefrigid ice giant
Mirandafrigid airless icy miniaquariafrigid icy miniglacia
Titaniafrigid airless icy subaquariafrigid icy subglacia
Neptunefrigid neptunefrigid ice giant
Proteusfrigid airless icy superasteroidfrigid icy miniglacia
Tritonfrigid volcanic infrabaric icy subaquariafrigid volcanic icy subglacia
Plutofrigid volcanic infrabaric cryoglacial icy subaquariafrigid icy subglacia with nitrogen glaciers
Charonfrigid airless icy miniaquariafrigid icy miniglacia
 
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New planet classification

23 Jul 2017 04:21

Some exoplanets (atmosphere and surface classes are fake of course)

Kepler-10 btorrid airless pyrooceanic rocky superterratorrid tidally locked rocky superterra with magma oceans
COROT-7 btorrid hypobaric pyrooceanic rocky superferriatorrid tidally locked rocky superferria with magma oceans
55 Cancri etorrid hypobaric pyrooceanic carbid supercarboniatorrid tidally locked carbid supercarbonia with magma oceans
51 Pegasi btorrid jupitertorrid tidally locked gas giant
TRAPPIST-1 bwarm hypobaric desertic rocky terrawarm tidally locked rocky terra
TRAPPIST-1 cwarm hyperbaric desertic rocky ferriawarm tidally locked rocky ferria
TRAPPIST-1 dtemperate mesobaric laky rocky terratemperate tidally locked rocky terra with water lakes
TRAPPIST-1 etemperate mesobaric oceanic watery terratemperate tidally locked rocky terra with water seas
TRAPPIST-1 fcool mesobaric oceanic watery aquariacool tidally locked oceania
TRAPPIST-1 gcool hyperbaric glacial icy terracool tidally locked rocky terra with water glaciers
TRAPPIST-1 hcold mesobaric icy aquariacold tidally locked icy glacia
Kepler-22 btemperate ultrabaric watery aquariatemperate oceania
HD 10180 ctorrid neptunetorrid tidally locked ice giant
HD 10180 hcool jupitercool gas giant
Proxima bcool glacial rocky terracool tidally locked rocky terra with water glaciers
Kepler-52 btorrid chthoniatorrid tidally locked chthonia
GD 66 bcold chthoniacold chthonia
Osiristorrid subjupitertorrid gas giant
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New planet classification

23 Jul 2017 16:09

I don't know how these words for description are going to sound in different languages. Maybe translators need to give also their opinion. If you are going to replace these words with the old ones, make it sound more understandable or give some manual for players. Not everybody knows what some descriptions mean, for example, hypobaric ferria.

I think that temperatures should be:

Very hot -> Hot -> warm -> temperate <- cool <- Cold <- Very cold since it sounds good in every language ( cool and cold for Serbian translation is almost same, and in the gui file I translated cool as cooled down, but it can also mean refreshing, fresh, chilly. And some gui files need to be updated) 
I took Russian gui file and translated it because I thought that there was the most lines for SE. But, that's going to updated in the next versions and in every version, gui needs to be updated.

Here's my example:
Mars     Cool rocky terra

I Don't know how all this sounds to others. 
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New planet classification

23 Jul 2017 17:24

*inhales*

SpaceEngineer wrote:
Source of the post But the description also cannot be too long.

SpaceEngineer wrote:
Source of the post Earth
temperate inhabited mesobaric marine rocky terra
temperate volcanic rocky terra with water seas and life

yeah

I think you're trying to cram too many parameters in one go, and it sounds pretty clunky. And there's the fact that Italian adjectives tend to be in reverse order compared to English!

At the very least, I suggest you guys to separe each word with a comma.

But frankly, my ideal opinion is that the infodump on the upper-left corner should be reorganized, with some of your proposed classes integrated with pre-existing lines. For example, this is the current infodump vs what I would suggest, about Earth:
vlcsnap-2017-06-09-16h48m45s749.png


this would allow some double-worders to be used safely, for example temperature which I'm sure would make life easier for many of us translators
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New planet classification

23 Jul 2017 17:28

As for the specifics of the bulk, surface, and volatile compositions, I'd make a sixth folder in the wiki in the same style as the atmosphere one, going into detail about each component proportion without having to overload the class line.
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New planet classification

23 Jul 2017 17:50

For Earth, "temperate inhabited mesobaric marine rocky terra" doesnt seem to roll off the tongue to easy. What about "temperate inhabited mesobaric rocky marine terra"? For me anyway, just flipping "marine rocky" to "rocky marine" seems to make it roll off my tongue easier. How would that affect the rest of the classification system, and does it translate to Russian well or no?
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New planet classification

24 Jul 2017 02:03

I'll try to get to the point with possible Italian translation issues for readability and correctness.

The main issue is, as mentioned by XBrain130, that in italian bulk_class, a noun, must be placed before all other classes or it will be a wrong construct.

Secondly, adjectives like rocky, temperate must be written with different declension according to the gender of the related noun.
By translating some classification you came up with:











Earthtemperate inhabited mesobaric marine rocky terra  temperate volcanic rocky terra with water seas and life
4 Vesta cold airless rocky superasteroid  cold rocky miniterra
Saturncold jupiter  cold gas giant
Uranusfrigid neptune   frigid ice giant


becomes:

Terra          terra temperata abitata mesobarica marina rocciosa        terra temperata vulcanica rocciosa con acqua mari e vita
4 Vesta      superasteroide freddo senz'aria roccioso                          miniterra fredda rocciosa
Saturno      gioviano freddo                                                                  gigante gassoso freddo
                      ^ (adjective, pertaining to jupiter, used as name)
Urano         nettuniano gelido                                                               gigante gassoso gelido

because terra, ferria and others are feminine but asteroide and gioviano, nettuniano are masculine.

That's a typical issue in Italian while working with parameters for translation. As far as I recall, French translation will have same issues with genders.
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New planet classification

24 Jul 2017 02:47

Mosfet wrote:
Source of the post Secondly, adjectives like rocky, temperate must be written with different declension according to the gender of the related noun.

The same is true for Russian, so this has already been planned for. You will be able to specify masculine, feminine, and neuter translations for each term, and which should be used with which class. The exact details are still being worked on.
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New planet classification

24 Jul 2017 02:48

I'm not going to destroy all the wonderful work you've done, but maybe I personally prefer shorter descriptions that SE currently use. :)
Will that system be deleted and replaced or just being an addition?
The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition.

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New planet classification

24 Jul 2017 02:55

Salvo wrote:
Source of the post Will that system be deleted and replaced or just being an addition?

This will replace the old system. The goal, as stated above, is to better describe the properties of worlds in SE in the class name. To do this you must, at a minimum, describe both its surface class and bulk class (like "hot rocky ferria" for Mercury).
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New planet classification

24 Jul 2017 02:58

XBrain130 wrote:
Source of the post And there's the fact that Italian adjectives tend to be in reverse order compared to English!

PlutonianEmpire wrote:
Source of the post For me anyway, just flipping "marine rocky" to "rocky marine" seems to make it roll off my tongue easier.

Mosfet wrote:
Source of the post The main issue is, as mentioned by XBrain130, that in italian bulk_class, a subject, must be placed before all other classes or it will be a wrong construct.


Ok, I should make a word order configurable. Adding parameters to the <loc>-gui.cfg, something like this:

ClassOrderAtmoPressure 0
ClassOrderAtmoBreath  -1 // don't use this class
ClassOrderVolatiles    1
ClassOrderBulk         2

Mosfet wrote:
Source of the post Secondly, adjectives like rocky, temperate must be written with different declension according to the gender of the subject.
By translating some classification you came up with:

I already implemented this feature. The <loc>-gui.cfg has these parameters:

// Gender of a planet class words. Used to generate a planet class description strings.
// Possible values: "masculine", "feminine", "neuter"
GenderAsteroid    "masculine"
GenterTerra       "feminine"
GenderCarbonia    "feminine"
GenderFerria      "feminine"
GenderOceania     "feminine"
GenderCryogenia   "feminine"
GenderIceGiant    "masculine"
GenderGasGiant    "masculine"
GenderHeliumGiant "masculine"
GenderEarth       "feminine"
GenderTitan       "masculine"
GenderNeptune     "masculine"
GenderJupiter     "masculine"
GenderChthonia    "feminine"


And word scorched, mesobaric etc are represented in 3 forms for 3 genders (Russian translation):
"frozen#masculine"      "замороженный"
"frozen#feminine"       "замороженная"
"frozen#neuter"         "замороженное"
"airless#masculine"     "безвоздушный"
"airless#feminine"      "безвоздушная"
"airless#neuter"        "безвоздушное"
"ultrabaric#masculine"  "ультрабарический"
"ultrabaric#feminine"   "ультрабарическая"
"ultrabaric#neuter"     "ультрабарическое"


While generating the class string, engine selects one of these 3 forms based on the gender configuration.
English does not use genders for adjectives, so I added "eng-gui.cfg" file and typed the same "translation" for them:
"cold#masculine" "cold"
"cold#feminine"  "cold"
"cold#neuter"    "cold"


Is this enough? Does declension depends only on the planet class word (terra, giant etc) or I must upgrade the "language processor" even more? (Ok, adding a configurable word order).
 
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Mosfet
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New planet classification

24 Jul 2017 05:31

HarbingerDawn, SpaceEngineer, wow, given the range of possibilities you just illustrated, I'd say Italian should be pretty well covered. Kudos.
I can see the possibility of an automated wiki description for procedural planets not so far in the future.
For the sake of compactness, personally I'd choose HarbingerDawn's solution as of now. Let's see where the thread will go.
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problemecium
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New planet classification

24 Jul 2017 17:59

Hmmm, very interesting and sophisticated. I'll have to go over it all again later.

For now, why a distinction between chthonias, terras, carbonias, and ferrias? I suspect that in practice, all planets within these categories fall into a smooth gradient without much of any clear-cut boundaries, and for another it seems inconsistent to categorize iron and carbon as fundamentally separate but lump all other minerals together.
Also from what I've heard, all of the Solar system's inner planets are effectively gas giant cores, granting that the gas planets they once were didn't stay that way for long. From what I see in the OP, the only distinct feature of a chthonia is that it used to be a gas giant and it doesn't have any clear present-day features to set it apart from a "normal" terrestrial planet.
Perhaps, as a suggestion, lump all solid balls of rock together as a "terra," "terrestrial," or perhaps even just "world" and include the primary chemical composition in the short description, perhaps with a slash for half-and-half worlds, e.g.:
Earth: "temperate rocky/metallic terrestrial with life"
Mercury: "hot metallic subterrestrial"
Pluto: "frigid icy subterrestrial"
Some carbon planet: "temperate carbon terrestrial"
Some planet that's half carbon and half iron: "temperate metallic/carbon terrestrial"
Jupiter's naked core (probably): "cold metallic superterrestrial"

And one more thing I just thought up: No arbitrary class letters, but perhaps where appropriate, e.g. in the F2 window, an easily memorized code system like this:
Earth: T1sm
Mars: T0s
Jupiter: G3h
A big ball of half water and half nickel massing 14 Earths: G2im
T = terrestrial planet (mainly solid); G = gas planet (mainly fluid)
Number = power of ten Earth masses, roughly, so something like "3" for Jupiter with between 100 and 1000 Earth masses and "00" for the Moon with between 0.1 and 0.01 Earth masses.
s = silicates or other nonmetallic rocks; m = iron or other metals; i = ices (water, methane, etc.) in solid or liquid form; h = hydrogen; and so on
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Julian
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New planet classification

24 Jul 2017 21:23

Mosfet wrote:
Saturno      gioviano freddo                                                                  gigante gassoso freddo
                      ^ (adjective, pertaining to jupiter, used as name)

If the terms "gas giant" and "ice giant" need to be replaced, I think it would look better to have equivalents to "jovian" and "neptunian" used in all languages instead of "jupiter" and "neptune".

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