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JackDole
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14 Mar 2017 12:35

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Hi where can I download the 7 new exoplanets

Here.
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post (and is there a way to automatically update exoplanets as they are discovered like Starry Night Pro Plus does?)

No. But they may be updated in the next version of SpaceEngine.
In the meantime you can create own scripts for newly discovered exoplanets.



And you should not repeatedly ask the same question in different threads.
 
A-L-E-X
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14 Mar 2017 14:23

Thanks Jack!  If one were to create a script for newly discovered exoplanets, how would they be able to create the 3D textures to display them in the program, rather than just place a marker?
 
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JackDole
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14 Mar 2017 14:33

A-L-E-X,
You can find instructions on how to create addons here.
 
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MrZoolook
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15 Mar 2017 12:43

skywalker66 wrote:
Source of the post Is it possible that the terrestrial exoplanets in SE can have a combined set of large shield volcanoes, stratovolcanoes AND fold mountains? I believe I found such one world at RS 8474-1792-7-1182176-266 A5

Nice find!
 
A-L-E-X
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16 Mar 2017 02:38

JackDole wrote:
A-L-E-X,
You can find instructions on how to create addons here.

Thanks Jack.  I really like the search feature in SE but I could not find the most extreme redshifted objects like GN-z11 and distant GRBs, so I can try to add them with those?  Also, I have the Tycho star catalog from Starry Night Pro Plus, could that also be added to SE?  It would add many times more stars than what are available with the Hipparcos catalog.
 
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JackDole
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16 Mar 2017 02:54

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post  I could not find the most extreme redshifted objects like GN-z11 and distant GRBs, so I can try to add them with those?

You can try.
 
A-L-E-X
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SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

16 Mar 2017 03:21

More info on the catalogs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hipparcos ... catalogues

Published catalogues[font=sans-serif][color=#555555][edit][/font][/color]
Principal observational characteristics of the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues. ICRS is the International Celestial Reference System.




























[th]Property[/th]
[th]Value[/th]





















































Common:
   Measurement period1989.8—1993.2
   Catalogue epochJ1991.25
   Reference systemICRS
     • coincidence with ICRS (3 axes)±0.6 mas
     • deviation from inertial (3 axes)±0.25 mas/yr
Hipparcos Catalogue:
   Number of entries118,218
     • with associated astrometry    117,955
     • with associated photometry    118,204
   Mean sky density≈3 per sq deg
   Limiting magnitudeV≈12.4 mag
   CompletenessV=7.3-9.0 mag
Tycho Catalogue:
   Number of entries1,058,332
     • based on Tycho data    1,052,031
     • with only Hipparcos data    6301
   Mean sky density25 per sq deg
   Limiting magnitudeV≈11.5 mag
   Completeness to 90 per centV≈10.5 mag
   Completeness to 99.9 per centV≈10.0 mag
Tycho 2 Catalogue:
   Number of entries2,539,913
   Mean sky density:
      • at b=0°≈150 per sq deg
      • at b=±30°≈50 per sq deg
      • at b=±90°≈25 per sq deg
   Completeness to 90 per centV≈11.5 mag
   Completeness to 99 per centV≈11.0 mag

[img=292x0]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d8/Hipparcos_Catalogue_equirectangular_plot.svg/300px-Hipparcos_Catalogue_equirectangular_plot.svg.png[/img]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hipparcos_Catalogue_equirectangular_plot.svg
Equirectangular plot of declination vs right ascension of stars brighter than apparent magnitude 5 on the Hipparcos Catalogue, coded by spectral type and apparent magnitude, relative to the modern constellations and the ecliptic


The final Hipparcos Catalogue was the result of the critical comparison and merging of the two (NDAC and FAST consortia) analyses, and contains 118,218 entries (stars or multiple stars), corresponding to an average of some three stars per square degree over the entire sky.[color=#0b0080][8] Median precision of the five astrometric parameters (Hp<9 mag) exceeded the original mission goals, and are between 0.6–1.0 mas. Some 20,000 distances were determined to better than 10%, and 50,000 to better than 20%. The inferred ratio of external to standard errors is ≈1.0–1.2, and estimated systematic errors are below 0.1 mas. The number of solved or suspected double or multiple stars is 23,882.[9] Photometric observations yielded multi-epoch photometry with a mean number of 110 observations per star, and a median photometric precision (Hp<9 mag) of 0.0015 mag, with 11,597 entries were identified as variable or possibly-variable.[10][/color]
For the star mapper results, the data analysis was carried out by the Tycho Data Analysis Consortium (TDAC). The Tycho Catalogue comprises more than one million stars with 20–30 milliarc-sec astrometry and two-colour (B and V band) photometry.[color=#0b0080][11][/color]
The final Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues were completed in August 1996. The catalogues were published by [color=#0b0080]ESAon behalf of the scientific teams in June 1997.[12][/color]
A more extensive analysis of the star mapper (Tycho) data extracted additional faint stars from the data stream. Combined with old photographic plate observations made several decades earlier as part of the [color=#0b0080]Astrographic Catalogue programme, the Tycho-2 Catalogue of more than 2.5 million stars (and fully superseding the original Tycho Catalogue) was published in 2000.[13][/color]
The Hipparcos and Tycho-1 Catalogues were used to create the [color=#0b0080]Millennium Star Atlas: an all-sky atlas of one million stars to visual magnitude 11. Some 10,000 nonstellar objects are also included to complement the catalogue data.[14][/color]
Between 1997 and 2007, investigations into subtle effects in the satellite attitude and instrument calibration continued. A number of effects in the data that had not been fully accounted for were studied, such as scan-phase discontinuities and micrometeoroid-induced attitude jumps. A re-reduction of the associated steps of the analysis was eventually undertaken.[color=#0b0080][15] This has led to improved astrometric accuracies for stars brighter than Hp=9.0 mag, reaching a factor of about three for the brightest stars (Hp<4.5 mag), while also underlining the conclusion that theHipparcos Catalogue as originally published is generally reliable within the quoted accuracies.[/color]
All catalogue data are available online from the [color=#0b0080]Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg.[/color]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centre_de_Donn%C3%A9es_astronomiques_de_Strasbourg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tycho-2_Catalogue

[color=#000000][font=Linux Libertine, Georgia, Times, serif]Catalogue[font=sans-serif][color=#555555][edit][/font][/color]
[/font][/color]
The [color=#0b0080]astrometric reference catalogue contain positions, proper motions, and two-color photometric data for the 2,539,913 of the brightest stars in the Milky Way, of which about 9000 are visible to the naked eye. Components of double stars with separations down to 0.8 arcseconds are included. The catalogue is 99% complete tomagnitudes of V~11.0 and 90% complete to V~11.5. (,[1] Table 1)[/color]

The Tycho-2 positions and magnitudes are based on the observations collected by the star mapper of the [color=#0b0080]European Space Agency's Hipparcos satellite. They are the same observations used to compile the Tycho-1 Catalogue (ESA SP-1200, 1997). However, Tycho-2 is much larger and a bit more precise, because a more advanced reduction technique was used.[/color]

The [color=#0b0080]U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) first compiled the ACT (Astrographic Catalog/Tycho) Reference Catalog, containing nearly one million stars, by combining theAstrographic Catalogue (AC 2000) with the Tycho-1 Catalogue; the large epoch span between the two catalogues improved the accuracy of proper motions by about an order of magnitude. Tycho-2 now supersedes the ACT.[/color]

Proper motions precise to about 2.5 milliarcseconds per year are given as derived from a comparison with the Astrographic Catalogue (AC 2000) and 143 other ground-based astrometric catalogues, all reduced to the Hipparcos [color=#0b0080]celestial coordinate system. There were only about 100,000 stars for which proper motion could not be derived. For stars brighter than Vt=9, the astrometric error is 7 milliarcseconds. The overall error for all stars is 60 milliarcseconds. The observational period was from 1989.85 to 1993.21 and the mean satellite observation epoch is 1991.5.[/color]

Photometric accuracy for stars brighter than Vt=9 is 0.013 magnitude; for all stars it is 0.10 magnitude.

Accessing the catalogue[font=sans-serif][color=#555555][edit][/font][/color]

To enable rapid access of specific stars in the catalogue, WCSTools software numbers each star using its Guide Star region number (0001-9537) and a five-digit star number within each region, separated by a decimal point. sty2 lists Tycho-2 stars by number or sky region. imty2 lists the Tycho-2 stars within an IRAF or FITS image using the world coordinate system defined in its header.

[color=#0b0080]Perl program for extracting data from the catalogue is available from http://archive.eso.org/ASTROM/. Tycho-2 File Formats WCSTools software uses the files catalog.dat and index.dat.[/color]

External resources[font=sans-serif][color=#555555][edit][/font][/color]

The following FTP sites make the Tycho-2 catalogue available as 19 gzipped files. After retrieving them and the index.dat file, combine the gzipped files into catalog.dat. The resulting files will differ from the files on the CD-ROM in that they will end lines with only a linefeed, while the CD-ROM version for which WCSTools software was written terminates lines with a carriage return and a linefeed. Add the carriage returns to the files using the [color=#0b0080]unix2dos -ascii command.[/color]

Put the catalog.dat and index.dat files in a subdirectory data/ to the directory pointed to by the TY2_PATH environment parameter or the ty2cd variable in libwcs/ty2read.c.

  • Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg

    http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/Cat?I/259Published catalogues[edit]Principal observational characteristics of the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues. ICRS is the International Celestial Reference System.PropertyValueCommon:   Measurement period1989.8—1993.2   Catalogue epochJ1991.25   Reference systemICRS     • coincidence with ICRS (3 axes)±0.6 mas     • deviation from inertial (3 axes)±0.25 mas/yrHipparcos Catalogue:   Number of entries118,218     • with associated astrometry    117,955     • with associated photometry    118,204   Mean sky density≈3 per sq deg   Limiting magnitudeV≈12.4 mag   CompletenessV=7.3-9.0 magTycho Catalogue:   Number of entries1,058,332     • based on Tycho data    1,052,031     • with only Hipparcos data    6301   Mean sky density25 per sq deg   Limiting magnitudeV≈11.5 mag   Completeness to 90 per centV≈10.5 mag   Completeness to 99.9 per centV≈10.0 magTycho 2 Catalogue:   Number of entries2,539,913   Mean sky density:      • at b=0°≈150 per sq deg      • at b=±30°≈50 per sq deg      • at b=±90°≈25 per sq deg   Completeness to 90 per centV≈11.5 mag   Completeness to 99 per centV≈11.0 magEquirectangular plot of declination vs right ascension of stars brighter than apparent magnitude 5 on the Hipparcos Catalogue, coded by spectral type and apparent magnitude, relative to the modern constellations and the eclipticThe final Hipparcos Catalogue was the result of the critical comparison and merging of the two (NDAC and FAST consortia) analyses, and contains 118,218 entries (stars or multiple stars), corresponding to an average of some three stars per square degree over the entire sky.[8] Median precision of the five astrometric parameters (Hp<9 mag) exceeded the original mission goals, and are between 0.6–1.0 mas. Some 20,000 distances were determined to better than 10%, and 50,000 to better than 20%. The inferred ratio of external to standard errors is ≈1.0–1.2, and estimated systematic errors are below 0.1 mas. The number of solved or suspected double or multiple stars is 23,882.[9] Photometric observations yielded multi-epoch photometry with a mean number of 110 observations per star, and a median photometric precision (Hp<9 mag) of 0.0015 mag, with 11,597 entries were identified as variable or possibly-variable.[10]For the star mapper results, the data analysis was carried out by the Tycho Data Analysis Consortium (TDAC). The Tycho Catalogue comprises more than one million stars with 20–30 milliarc-sec astrometry and two-colour (B and V band) photometry.[11]The final Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues were completed in August 1996. The catalogues were published by ESAon behalf of the scientific teams in June 1997.[12]A more extensive analysis of the star mapper (Tycho) data extracted additional faint stars from the data stream. Combined with old photographic plate observations made several decades earlier as part of the Astrographic Catalogue programme, the Tycho-2 Catalogue of more than 2.5 million stars (and fully superseding the original Tycho Catalogue) was published in 2000.[13]The Hipparcos and Tycho-1 Catalogues were used to create the Millennium Star Atlas: an all-sky atlas of one million stars to visual magnitude 11. Some 10,000 nonstellar objects are also included to complement the catalogue data.[14]Between 1997 and 2007, investigations into subtle effects in the satellite attitude and instrument calibration continued. A number of effects in the data that had not been fully accounted for were studied, such as scan-phase discontinuities and micrometeoroid-induced attitude jumps. A re-reduction of the associated steps of the analysis was eventually undertaken.[15] This has led to improved astrometric accuracies for stars brighter than Hp=9.0 mag, reaching a factor of about three for the brightest stars (Hp<4.5 mag), while also underlining the conclusion that theHipparcos Catalogue as originally published is generally reliable within the quoted accuracies.All catalogue data are available online from the Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg.
 
A-L-E-X
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SpaceEngine F.A.Q.

16 Mar 2017 03:22

JackDole wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post  I could not find the most extreme redshifted objects like GN-z11 and distant GRBs, so I can try to add them with those?

You can try.

Thanks, Jack.  Will the other very distant objects be implemented in the next release?  Also, will the Tycho and Tycho-2 Catalogs be implemented- that would increase the number of real stars from over 100,000 to over 2 million!  I believe the data is freely available.
 
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Mosfet
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16 Mar 2017 03:59

A-L-E-X, are you using some special combination of colors/fonts with your browser? Copy-pasting the internet like this it makes unreadable your posts.
It would be much more effective to simply link the original pages.
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Xoran
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16 Mar 2017 06:07

Sorry for going off-topic, but am i the only one thinking this thread doesn't belong in the News and Announcement forum?
Space is too big to understand, so do not try to understand.
 
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PlutonianEmpire
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20 Mar 2017 16:16

Just to double check so I know for sure; are the style ranges in the palette.cfg file linked in anyway to a planet's temperature (such as 0 = scorched and 1.0 = frozen)? Or something else? Or is it procedurally randomized?
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