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FreeLock3
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The Future of Humanity & Intelligent life in the universe

24 Feb 2019 05:50

I think we have no future ... Look at what we have turned the earth into. It is impossible to destroy something for no reason and believe in a miracle. Perhaps space programs will really help us to move to another planet and survive)
 
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24 Feb 2019 11:48

FreeLock3, there is nothing outside of a superbug or nuclear holocaust that will lead to the extinction of humanity in this century.  The consequences of climate change, even at the worst possible scenario, are at a point where we will have already spread to other bodies in the solar system or migrated to bunkers and domed cities.  Humanity is on the verge of achieving true technological immortality and AI, long before climate change effects are in full swing.


Don't forget, our detectors are not large enough to truly detect alien radio signals unless they are directly aimed at us at a high energy, as the bubble spreading from our system is extremely weak beyond around 20Ly.
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25 Feb 2019 00:19

DoctorOfSpace wrote:
Source of the post as the bubble spreading from our system is extremely weak beyond around 20Ly.

I'm honestly surprised at the amount of people who don't realize this. I've even heard a few astronomers and radio experts tout the false claim that our emissions are "visible since we have started transmitting - up to a hundred years ago and visible from a hundred light-years away". Maybe they omitted the gritty details to simplify things for a larger audience. 

FreeLock3 wrote:
Source of the post Perhaps space programs will really help us to move to another planet and survive)

FreeLock3, no. This is really a silly notion that would do well to die. To explain how it is unrealistic, I will redirect you here to this thread where I discussed this with another user: http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=47&start=1410.

Doc is right, by the time we have reached a point in technological and societal development whereof we can colonize other planets or space itself with artificial habitats, the our current environmental concerns won't matter much, at least not in the present context.
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25 Feb 2019 00:36

Climate change by CO2 emissions is nowhere near a threat to life on Earth.  We have increased CO2 in the atmosphere by almost 50%, and the effects on climate are fairly limited.  You have to know what to look for in order to detect them.  And an increased amount of CO2 is required for every extra unit of temperature change, making it increasingly hard to ruin the planet.  It may be theoretically possible to increase CO2 to toxic levels, but if we deliberately attempt to ruin the planet, CO2 is not the way to go. So, what would be the most efficient way?  Nuclear holocaust may be much for effective, yes.  If we make all the nuclear weapons that the global economy would allow and detonated them all in a single day across the globe, I think Earth and humankind would require centuries to recover.  But to make Earth a worse place than anywhere else in the solar system, or within a 100 lightyears or so, I don't think we have the technology even if we decided to ruin Earth as a deliberate global effort (which is quite absurd, but for the sake of the argument...).
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25 Feb 2019 04:14

[quote="Stellarator"][quote="DoctorOfSpace"][post]27231[/post] as the bubble spreading from our system is extremely weak beyond around 20Ly.[/quote]
I'm honestly surprised at the amount of people who don't realize this. I've even heard a few astronomers and radio experts tout the false claim that our emissions are "visible since we have started transmitting - up to a hundred years ago and visible from a hundred light-years away". Maybe they omitted the gritty details to simplify things for a larger audience. 

[quote="FreeLock3"][post]27229[/post] Perhaps space programs will really help us to move to another planet and survive)[/quote]
[b]FreeLock3[/b], no. This is really a silly notion that would do well to die. To explain how it is unrealistic, I will redirect you here to this thread where I discussed this with another user: [url=http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?p=27047#p27047]http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=47&start=1410.[/url]

[color=#2980b9][b]Doc[/b][/color] is right, by the time we have reached a point in technological and societal development whereof we can colonize other planets or space itself with artificial habitats, the our current environmental concerns won't matter much, at least not in the present context.[/quote]



I take my words back. While I was reading your posts I got the impression that you wrote a dissertation on this issue)
 
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04 Mar 2019 20:24

But what if we eventually learn to create our own universes?  That would give us a whole new purpose, and being able to create our own universes would open up a new universe of possibilities (pun intended!)

BTW I prefer option b) if high technological 'ascension' does occur, it has little effect on anything we could detect
 
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21 Mar 2019 08:45

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25 Mar 2019 23:54

Fusion: Still about ten years away! But nevertheless getting closer...

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26 Mar 2019 00:22

Stellarator wrote:
Source of the post Still about ten years away!

I though it had been 30 years away since the 50's, and it still was 30 years away a decade ago.  If it's 10 years now, perhaps we've finally come to the point that it's actually 30 years away!
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26 Mar 2019 02:15

midtskogen wrote:
Source of the post  If it's 10 years now, perhaps we've finally come to the point that it's actually 30 years away!

My manipulatory digits are crossed...

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27 Mar 2019 09:58

DoctorOfSpace wrote:

I found something similar (but I couldn't bare to watch it to the end cause severe melancholy & depression kicked in at around ~ 10minute mark):

Isaac Arthur has a strange (funny) accent. At least he keeps talking and prevents sever depression to me. I still couldn't watch it until the end. I will try when I am back home from work.
 
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27 Mar 2019 11:02

N0B0DY wrote:
Source of the post Isaac Arthur has a strange (funny) accent.

It is actually a speech impediment that disallows the pronunciation of the letter "R". He has gotten significantly better though since his debut in 2016-ish, largely due to speech therapy and will of effort.
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27 Mar 2019 13:17

N0B0DY wrote:
Source of the post I found something similar (but I couldn't bare to watch it to the end cause severe melancholy & depression kicked in at around ~ 10minute mark):


I linked that in Discord around an hour after it came out and a ton of people keep linking it.

The far future is going to be depressing, the near future is going to be depressing too. The human condition demands things on the universe that just aren't real or going to happen.
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28 Mar 2019 09:11

This is a very interesting video, let me calculate some minor facts.

The video starts with a 1 year/sec speed, which means that the video could have started 125 seconds before that (~2 minutes before) with real time flow (1 sec/sec speed), if we hold the "doubling of speed each 5 seconds" rule.

The time-travel part of the video is 27:25 minutes long. Which means that we are going ~1099sec/sec speed in the last few seconds, or around 2.3 x 1081 ages of the universe each second. That brings a lot of perspective. The other video of melodysheep goes at a constant speed of 2.2 x 106 years/sec. If the same rate were to be applied to this video then it wouldn't last 10 minutes as the first one but around 1069 times the entire history of the universe until now. So obviously they decided to have totally different rules from the first video.

Let us assume 1 trillion times more speed than the first video then, or 2.2 x 1018 years/sec. At this speed the entire history of the universe until now would last 6 nanoseconds, or something like a millionth of the duration of a single frame of the video (crazy fast). But still that would make the second video 1057 times longer than the entire history of the universe. Even if we use a rate 1050 faster than the previous video (100 quindecillions times faster) the video would still last 10,000,000,000,000,000,000 times longer than the age of the universe.

The only possibility is to make the second video go at 1069 times the rate of the first, in that case, you would only need to wait the age of the universe to finish it. But there is an interesting thing. The end of the stelliferous era, when the last star dies and faints out, at this crazy speed would last less than the planck time, an infinitessimal amount of a fraction of a nanosecond of this 13 billion year long video. Even the last proton decay (if it is possible), the dissolution of all matter in the universe (for which we would have to wait for thousands of trillions of trillions of trillions of years in real life) would only last a 0.0000000000000000000000004% of a nanosecond of the entire video. Think about that, in just a crazy small fraction of a nanosecond the entire history of planets, life, stars, galaxies, clusters, all matter would be concluded, the remaining billions of years of video would be just black holes and their evaporation. The universe is so young that we are just unable to grasp it.

So, that means a constant rate, even if extremely large, would be a problem for this video. The video coudn't be made in constant scale, nor even in linear scale, increasing the rate more and more. That's why it really has to be in exponential scale, increasing the rate of the flow of time exponentially. That is terrible for our sense of scale, we can't comprehend with this or any conceivable video the crazy amounts of time the universe will manage.

One last thing. The video ends when each particle in the universe is so distant from any other that even at light speed it would never reach to interact with the other in an expanding universe. This is when time starts to be meaningless since there can't be any physical event to register a succesion of causes and effects. But this is because the universe has an accelerated expansion. If the universe is more "static" then at this time the entropy of the universe would have reached its maximum and all that would be left is an homogenous soup of interacting subatomic particles in thermal equilibrium. In this scenario there can be statistical fluctuations that decrease momentarily the amount of entropy at different scales, spikes of "order" in "the soup". There are mathematical models that allow us to calculate the estimated time needed to make a fluctuation of a specific size in the soup to occur with some probability.

For example, it has been estimated that for a fluctuation to generate a brain our of this "soup of dissorder" you would need something like 1010^50 years, or 10100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 years. That number has 100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 zeros. Compare that with the 93 zeros of years of the timespan covered by the video. What the video shows is a crazy small fraction of time compared to what would be needed to show a concious being pop-up by a sudden statistical fluctuation. But even if that is true, using the increasing exponential rate of time used in the video we shouldn't be there in to much time..... right? Wrong, because even with an exponential growth of the rate at which time flows you would still have to wait 3.8 x 1033 times de current age of the universe to get to that part of the video. Each 5 seconds doubling the speed of the video and still you would have to wait an incomprehensible amount of time to see that episode of the history of the universe. But when you reach that part of the video it would be quite fun, each few seconds a conscious being would pop-up into existence, and many other things, few seconds later that would start to become very usual as the speed of the video increases more and more, eventually there should be a moment when the entire universe could pop-up into existence again but this instant is way, way farther away, around a googolplex of times more than the time you would have to wait to get to the Boltzman brain part of the video (remember, this is with exponential increse in the speed of the video).
 
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28 Mar 2019 15:52





If these had been posted before, I think they are still worthy of a re-watch.
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