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DoctorOfSpace
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The Future of Humanity & Intelligent life in the universe

06 Jan 2017 01:30

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DoctorOfSpace
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12 Jan 2017 13:25

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Xoran
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02 Feb 2017 10:21

On a slightly unrelated note, how many planets with intelligent life do you believe exist in the Milky Way?
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Watsisname
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02 Feb 2017 13:20

At least one, though I'm actually not certain about the one.
 
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DoctorOfSpace
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02 Feb 2017 15:54

Watsisname wrote:
Source of the post I'm actually not certain about the one.

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Xoran wrote:
Source of the post how many planets with intelligent life do you believe exist in the Milky Way?

From my own understanding of life and the universe my assumption is less than 1 per 500bil stars.  I suspect larger galaxies may have more, but then again they are more active so perhaps civilizations get wiped out more often.
I think rare Earth is the most logical view.  Earth has far too many special variables so of course we find ourselves where it is possible for us to exist.  While most of science is supported by mediocrity, Earth is most likely one of the few special things we have from all the countless unlikely events that allowed intelligent life to evolve and become technological.
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Xoran
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03 Feb 2017 01:58

My guess is that around 1 out of 1 billion planetary systems has sentient life, but this is just my guess, and i am probably very, very wrong.
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05 Feb 2017 08:03

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Xoran
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05 Feb 2017 08:36

Interesting video, DoctorOfSpace. In my opinion, AI should not be more intelligent than humans, preferably the same intelligence level as humans. Also, i believe it would be a good thing if robots had different strengths and weaknesses than humans, a symbiosis between AI and humans would make an AI revolution unlikely.
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DoctorOfSpace
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05 Feb 2017 08:54

An AI revolution is inevitable so long as we keep advancing.

AI taking over and humanity going extinct as a result seems to be an inevitability.  The real question is how long until that happens and how will it happen.  Humans could be wiped out immediately, humans could slowly die off as AI expands, or humans could merge with the AI and eventually stop being human altogether but humans remaining human is not going to happen.  Once you reach general intelligence it won't take long for that AI to exceed the capabilities of any human and then exceed every human.
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Xoran
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05 Feb 2017 09:13

DoctorOfSpace, if neither humans and AI are discriminated against, an AI revolution is unlikely. If an AI revolution is inevitable, it will probably be delayed significantly by equality between humans and AI though. But AI is probably a bad idea if it can wipe us out.

Also,
DoctorOfSpace wrote:
Source of the post From my own understanding of life and the universe my assumption is less than 1 per 500bil stars.  I suspect larger galaxies may have more, but then again they are more active so perhaps civilizations get wiped out more often.I think rare Earth is the most logical view.  Earth has far too many special variables so of course we find ourselves where it is possible for us to exist.  While most of science is supported by mediocrity, Earth is most likely one of the few special things we have from all the countless unlikely events that allowed intelligent life to evolve and become technological.


Xoran wrote:
Source of the post My guess is that around 1 out of 1 billion planetary systems has sentient life, but this is just my guess, and i am probably very, very wrong.

The amount of planets with sentient life depends on the definition of the word "sentient". Human-level sentience is probably very rare, but if animals like a fish or so are defined as sentient, the number of star systems with sentient life could be as high as one out of 10.000 or higher :)
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05 Feb 2017 09:33

Xoran wrote:
Source of the post But AI is probably a bad idea if it can wipe us out.

The development of AI is an end game scenario.  The first country or group of people to develop it will have never have anyone capable of outpacing them again.  AI at this point is inevitable, someone will develop it and it will probably be the last human invention.

Xoran wrote:
Source of the post but if animals like a fish or so are defined as sentient, the number of star systems with sentient life could be as high as one out of 10.000 or higher


Life is probably common, fish and other complex life is probably rare, and intelligent life is probably exceedingly more rare.
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05 Feb 2017 10:26

DoctorOfSpace wrote:
Source of the post Life is probably common, fish and other complex life is probably rare, and intelligent life is probably exceedingly more rare.

by life i understand you mean unicellular lifeforms. and for my opinion fish will be more common than land lifeforms (getting this evidence from earth itself) 
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05 Feb 2017 12:17

Spacer wrote:
Source of the post and for my opinion fish will be more common than land lifeforms

Sounds reasonable, assuming that life generally first evolves in the ocean.  For intelligent life, I wonder if intelligent oceanic life is more common than intelligent terrestrial life in the universe.  If life starts in the ocean, one would guess that intelligent oceanic life is much more common, but the evidence from Earth speaks against it.
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05 Feb 2017 12:20

for me it sound a bit strange to imagine intelligent oceanic lifeforms. how will they build? will they have arms? how will they developed technology? it sound a bit strange but i remember i discussed this with doc about intelligent life forms on europa.
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05 Feb 2017 12:25

midtskogen wrote:
Spacer wrote:
Source of the post and for my opinion fish will be more common than land lifeforms

Sounds reasonable, assuming that life generally first evolves in the ocean.  For intelligent life, I wonder if intelligent oceanic life is more common than intelligent terrestrial life in the universe.  If life starts in the ocean, one would guess that intelligent oceanic life is much more common, but the evidence from Earth speaks against it.

Image
WRONG

I think there is more intelligent life in our oceans than on land. Take dolphins or the various species of octopus for example (especially *octopi, arguably, some species are even more intelligent than humans)
-*how do you spell -plural octopus- anyway?
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