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midtskogen
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05 Mar 2018 03:16

The icicles here have been steadily becoming larger every time we pass this building this winter.  The large one probably is a few 100 kg now.  Better stay a bit clear.
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Last edited by midtskogen on 05 Mar 2018 03:44, edited 1 time in total.
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Starlight Glimmer
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05 Mar 2018 03:17

Damn! We never see anything like that here. I suppose that Oslo has worse winters than new york, then?
 
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midtskogen
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05 Mar 2018 04:14

My weather station hasn't recorded a blip above freezing since January.

We had a birthday party in the forest for my 7 year old daughter this weekend.  I dug a 2x3m pit in the snow so we could have a fire.  It took a while to reach the ground one and half meter below.  I cut out a stairway to make it possible to enter the pit.

But as always, it's been worse before.  Oslo, 1951.
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05 Mar 2018 05:05

That's wonderful. About those icicles, they seem dangerous. Is there a purpose for letting them in place instead of crush them down, or am I a simpleton and nobody simply cared to do it? :)
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midtskogen
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05 Mar 2018 05:33

Even an icicle just a few kg heavy can kill if they fall from a great height.  In this particular case there is no street or entrance near these icicles, so you need to be a bit careless if you go too close (but then there are children).  In the city many property owners simply place a danger sign on the street below the icicles rather than actually removing them (which may be required every week if the conditions are right).

The better solution is of course to improve the insulation of the buildings to prevent icicles to form in the first place (and conserve energy).
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05 Mar 2018 12:41

Thats an impressive amount of snow and icicles. How long do winters last?
 
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05 Mar 2018 13:18

Where I live in Oslo it happens that the snow is gone by the end of March, followed by snow that comes and goes in April.  Other winters it happens that the snow doesn't melt until early May, which will likely be the case this year.  We may have freak snowstorms until mid May (in 2017 half a meter fell 11 May and gave 3 days of good skiing).  The latest I've seen it snow here is 1 June.  The first snow usually comes in late October and melts again, and there's rarely good skiing conditions until early December, sometimes not before early January.  All in all winters vary a lot.  The greatest snow depth recorded in Oslo is 302 cm in April 1951 (at ~500m elevation).  The city centre is dryer and warmer, and rarely has more than 50 cm.
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08 Mar 2018 15:50

I am looking for this mod which I remembered was posted on the old forum but I cannot find it. It was based off alternate versions of the earth but they were very close together in the game. It involved the theory of alternate universes and such.
 
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08 Mar 2018 18:43

How was everyone? 
 
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14 Mar 2018 08:40

Happy pi day everyone!
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14 Mar 2018 13:24

Hornblower wrote:
Happy pi day everyone!

Happy π day to you too! 
But a sad day also, since you all know that Stephen Hawking passed away. :( Well, it's still a miracle that he lived this long considering the illness he had.
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15 Mar 2018 23:32

tornadotodd, I got your PM but currently I am having an issue on mobile, firefox, and chrome where I am unable to send a reply to PMs.  Not quite sure what is causing it but I got your PM about the models, no problem.
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31 Mar 2018 01:52

I took these two images on the same trip, really. 8000 km, 54 degrees centigrade and just over 24 hours separate them.  That was a long trip and the contrasts could hardly be larger.  Unusually warm for the season in Mountain View California (+27C), and unusually cold for the season in southern Norway (-27C). Work sent me to California in what should have been my Easter break, and I had to catch up with my family as quick as I could.  So, after many hours in airplanes, I got home, repacked, drove several hours as far as the road could take me, and then skied for four hours during the night to reach my destination.  I had a digital thermometer in my backpack, and it reached -27.4C during the cross country leg.  It could possibly have been even colder outside the backpack (and the car reported 83F when I drove on 101 to SFO, but let's say +27C and -27C for symmetry).

My face iced up much worse, but both my camera and phone soon died in the cold, so I got no pictures from the last half.  It was a beautifully bright moonlit night, and a stunning sunrise.  The ski part was entirely above 1000 masl and above the tree line.

a.jpg
b.jpg
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01 Apr 2018 08:05

I'm in utter astonishment at your Earthbound journeys, Mr Jack Frost ^

So, it looks like the habitable zone gas giant HD 28185 b is a transiting planet, and the light curve indicates the presence of a satellite of 0.8 Earth radii at a distance of 15 planetary radii. This confirms that potentially-habitable exomoons exist and may in fact be one of the most common environments for life in the universe.

Details and interview with lead author Dr Avril Poisson of the Foucault Optical Observatory in Lyon here: Interview
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08 Apr 2018 09:38

Gnargenox wrote:
I'm in utter astonishment at your Earthbound journeys, Mr Jack Frost ^

So, it looks like the habitable zone gas giant HD 28185 b is a transiting planet, and the light curve indicates the presence of a satellite of 0.8 Earth radii at a distance of 15 planetary radii. This confirms that potentially-habitable exomoons exist and may in fact be one of the most common environments for life in the universe.

Details and interview with lead author Dr Avril Poisson of the Foucault Optical Observatory in Lyon here: Interview

Woah, thats an interesting discovery. Makes me imagine what the sky of such a moon could look like, with that massive planet in the sky.

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