Ultimate space simulation software

 
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18 Nov 2017 07:10



Guess I should by one before the nuclear holocaust
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18 Nov 2017 14:18

I want one of them roadsters, so beautiful 
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18 Nov 2017 14:42

DoctorOfSpace, we have the rest of the Trump Presidency to go before they start making it. You might not be around by then  :P
"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
 
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19 Nov 2017 04:05

Gnargenox wrote:
Lately Ive been thoroughly engrossed watching these extremely realistic physics simulations of car crashes. No one was harmed in the making of these videos except a few car manufactures' safety ratings. I hope to see Space Engine match these landscape renderings some day soon too.

I want to see similar collision simulations happening on spacecrafts in SE.
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19 Nov 2017 11:17

Speedademon wrote:
Gnargenox wrote:
Lately Ive been thoroughly engrossed watching these extremely realistic physics simulations of car crashes. No one was harmed in the making of these videos except a few car manufactures' safety ratings. I hope to see Space Engine match these landscape renderings some day soon too.

I want to see similar collision simulations happening on spacecrafts in SE.

If BeamNG wan't considered a meme game, it would show all its power!
The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition.

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20 Nov 2017 06:21

Salvo wrote:
Speedademon wrote:
Gnargenox wrote:
Lately Ive been thoroughly engrossed watching these extremely realistic physics simulations of car crashes. No one was harmed in the making of these videos except a few car manufactures' safety ratings. I hope to see Space Engine match these landscape renderings some day soon too.

I want to see similar collision simulations happening on spacecrafts in SE.

If BeamNG wan't considered a meme game, it would show all its power!

BeamNG is considered a meme game? Didn't know that some people made it into a meme. Or maybe you are just joking about its physics being added for spacecrafts in SE. :P It would be cool as any other collision stuff in games. Maybe suggest it in suggestions thread? But it won't happen anytime soon as we all know. Or there is already some similar suggestion.
Anyway, BeamNG is great game with the best physics you will find for cars!
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21 Nov 2017 03:08

Random question: how impressive is it if you've read and comprehended Principia Mathematica by age 21?
 
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22 Nov 2017 08:56

t
 
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22 Nov 2017 09:14

GP300 wrote:
t

Look! A random answer! lol
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22 Nov 2017 23:45

I like to get my inspiration from really meaningful phrases said by truly great people like “I can control my passions and emotions if I can understand their nature”, do you know where I can find thematic compiltaions of those?

nope
 
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24 Nov 2017 11:38

I wonder what anti-matter's shelf life is? Does it decay at the same rate as normal matter? Is the reason the universe is asymmetrical is because it all fused into Dark Matter? I guess only Math knows.
Antimatter shelf life.jpg
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24 Nov 2017 15:11

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post wonder what anti-matter's shelf life is? Does it decay at the same rate as normal matter?


As far as anyone can tell it is exactly the same as normal matter. It is still unknown if normal matter will ever decay anyway, plausible but unknown.

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post Is the reason the universe is asymmetrical is because it all fused into Dark Matter?


Don't think that is how it works, and if it is I have never heard anything about it.
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28 Nov 2017 11:36

Gnargenox wrote:
I wonder what anti-matter's shelf life is? Does it decay at the same rate as normal matter? Is the reason the universe is asymmetrical is because it all fused into Dark Matter? I guess only Math knows.

The antimatter's shelf life as well as the shelf's life would be around a few microseconds. I'd need some Math to figure out the precise number.
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30 Nov 2017 17:22

Mr. Missed Her wrote:
Source of the post The antimatter's shelf life as well as the shelf's life would be around a few microseconds

Took me a minute to get that!  :)
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30 Nov 2017 19:23

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post I wonder what anti-matter's shelf life is? Does it decay at the same rate as normal matter?

Theoretically an antimatter particle should have the same decay timescale as its matter particle partner.  For example, a positron is the antiparticle of an electron, which as far as we know never decays.  In practice, its shelf life depends on the container -- on how well you can confine it and prevent it from annihilating with matter.

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post Is the reason the universe is asymmetrical is because it all fused into Dark Matter?

No.  The annihilation of matter and antimatter shortly after the Big Bang is responsible for releasing an enormous amount of energy in the form of photons, which made the universe radiation dominated.  If instead all the antimatter somehow converted to dark matter, then this source of energy would have been removed -- sequestered in the dark matter.  The universe would have evolved very differently.  It would have skipped the radiation-dominated phase and gone directly to matter-dominated.

We can also be very sure that matter-antimatter annihilation does not produce dark matter, at least at the energies probed in particle accelerator experiments.  If dark matter was being created, and if we are unable to detect those dark matter particles directly, then the creation of dark matter would appear as a violation of conservation laws, as the dark matter particles sneak away some of the energy and momentum from the collision.

The reason the universe has an asymmetry between matter and antimatter is thought to instead be a result of small violations of conservation laws in the generation of matter and antimatter (e.g. out of vacuum fields [pair production], or by the decay of other particles), after the Big Bang.  If there is a very slight difference in the amount of antimatter vs. matter generated, then a great deal of annihilation will still occur, but leave behind some amount of matter that we observe today.  (Or for all we know it was the antimatter that won out and we are antimatter creatures calling matter antimatter -- the physics works out the same).

Maybe some of the annihilation does generate dark matter particles.  But the standard model of particle physics makes no predictions for how that would occur, and as of yet there is no consensus model for precisely why this asymmetry should occur.  This is one of the significant unsolved problems in physics. :)

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