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09 Sep 2017 11:44

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
 
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Watsisname
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09 Sep 2017 16:38

Lol, horizontal hail would be pretty terrifying.
 
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09 Sep 2017 20:06

I want to see megacryometeors one day :)  I read about a particularly alarming one that fell in Portugal back in the 1800s the size of an elephant!  I also want to experience ball lightning.  How does it pass through walls and spin and last for so long?  In laboratory experiments they've only managed to make it last for fractions of a second.

In the 1935 Labor Day hurricane the wind was so intense that the friction of it on the sand caused fires to occur mid-air!
 
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Watsisname
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09 Sep 2017 22:28

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I read about a particularly alarming one that fell in Portugal back in the 1800s the size of an elephant!


A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post In the 1935 Labor Day hurricane the wind was so intense that the friction of it on the sand caused fires to occur mid-air!


Where and by whom were these documented?
 
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10 Sep 2017 07:49

https://books.google.com/books?id=OLbvX ... ne&f=false

http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1935 ... ere-killed

http://www.storm2k.org/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=23205

I'm surprised you hadn't heard of it before, the violent winds causing the sand to cause fire sparks in the air was compared to a Van De Graaf generator.  

Documentation is in the footnotes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megacryometeor

. Jesús Martínez-Frías, a planetary geologist and astrobiologist at Institute of Geosciences (Spanish: Instituto de Geociencias, IGEO) in the Spanish National Research Council (Spanish: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, CSIC)[1] in Madrid, pioneered research into megacryometeors in January 2000 after ice chunks weighing up to 6.6 pounds (3.0 kg) rained on Spain out of cloudless skies for ten days.

Contents  [hide] 
1 Mass and size
2 Formation
3 References
4 External links
Mass and size[edit]
More than 50 megacryometeors have been recorded since the year 2000. They vary in mass between 0.5 kilograms (1.1 lb) to several tens of kilograms. One in Brazil weighed in at more than 50 kilograms (110 lb).[2] Chunks about 2 m (6 ft 7 in) in size fell in Scotland on 13 August 1849.[3]

Formation[edit]
The process that creates megacryometeors is not completely understood, mainly with respect to the atmospheric dynamics necessary to produce them. They may have a similar mechanism of formation to that leading to production of hailstones.[4] Scientific studies show that their composition matches normal tropospheric rainwater for the areas in which they fall. In addition, megacryometeors display textural variations of the ice and hydro-chemical and isotopic heterogeneity, which evidence a complex formation process in the atmosphere.[5][6][7] It is known that they do not form from airplane toilet leakage because the large chunks of ice that occasionally do fall from airliners are distinctly blue due to the disinfectant used.

Some have speculated that these ice chunks must have fallen from aircraft fuselages[4] after plain water ice accumulating on those aircraft through normal atmospheric conditions has simply broken loose. However, similar events occurred prior to the invention of aircraft.[8][9] Studies indicate that fluctuations in tropopause, associated with hydration of the lower stratosphere and stratospheric cooling, can be related to their formation.[5] A detailed micro-Raman spectroscopic study made it possible to place the formation of the megacryometeors within a particular range of temperatures: −10 to −20 °C (14 to −4 °F).[10] They are sometimes confused with meteors because they can leave small impact craters.

Interesting stuff about ball lightning too- apparently the great Nikola Tesla could reproduce them in the lab

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball_ligh ... cteristics
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball_ligh ... _lightning
 
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10 Sep 2017 14:38

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I'm surprised you hadn't heard of it before, the violent winds causing the sand to cause fire sparks in the air was compared to a Van De Graaf generator.

But there is a big difference between sparks from static electricity and actual flames from friction.
 
A-L-E-X
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10 Sep 2017 14:59

Mr. Abner wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I'm surprised you hadn't heard of it before, the violent winds causing the sand to cause fire sparks in the air was compared to a Van De Graaf generator.

But there is a big difference between sparks from static electricity and actual flames from friction.

Sorry I meant sparks of fire not something akin to a forest fire lol.  Needless to say, but it scared numerous people- of course they had never witnessed a Cat 5 in action before.
 
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Watsisname
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10 Sep 2017 16:24

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Sorry I meant sparks of fire not something akin to a forest fire lol.

Be careful of one's wording. :)  Sparks of electricity are not the same as sparks of fire, either.
There can also be electric discharges in the ash clouds of volcanic eruptions.

Be careful of one's sources, too.  Just because it is on wikipedia does not mean it is reliable, even if it has citations.  Check the citations, too.  The very large cryometeor in Brazil (second citation) is a broken link for example, and I can't find anything else about that event online. Some of the other reports seem more credible though.

Basically, I'm just trying to get you to apply cautious skepticism to everything you read online.  Critically reviewing a claim is an important part of science regardless of whether or not you think the claim is true.
 
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12 Sep 2017 10:01

Watsisname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Sorry I meant sparks of fire not something akin to a forest fire lol.

Be careful of one's wording. :)  Sparks of electricity are not the same as sparks of fire, either.
There can also be electric discharges in the ash clouds of volcanic eruptions.

Be careful of one's sources, too.  Just because it is on wikipedia does not mean it is reliable, even if it has citations.  Check the citations, too.  The very large cryometeor in Brazil (second citation) is a broken link for example, and I can't find anything else about that event online. Some of the other reports seem more credible though.

Basically, I'm just trying to get you to apply cautious skepticism to everything you read online.  Critically reviewing a claim is an important part of science regardless of whether or not you think the claim is true.

I completely agree with you, Wat (I wish I knew your real name, I find it weird calling someone Wat :P)  I agree with you about wikipedia too, I researched the footnotes and that's how I found the Nature articles.  About the megacryometer issue, I'm not sure how accurate it is (I've seen scientists on both sides of the issue) but I at least thought it was worthy of discussing because the scientist in Spain has done some in-depth research on  it and there was an article in Discovery magazine about it too (I also thought it was worthy of discussing because a scientific mechanism for why it might be occurring was outlined- many outlandish claims can't be taken seriously because there isn't a mechanisjh described for why it might happen (like some who want to draw a connection between solar activity and hurricanes- I can't find any kind of mechanism that would make that possible, however there is a possible mechanism for how TC's could lead to more tremors, which is what the Nature articles were about.  That's what made that research credible. I also found some of the ball lightning accounts amazing, but it seems like it's been viewed by so many reliable sources and somewhat replicated in the lab- but not for the amount of time or size it's been seen in the field- so there are still some mysteries surrounding it, but we do probably have a scientific mechanism for how and why it happens.)

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