Ultimate space simulation software

 
A-L-E-X
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 2092
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

Science and Astronomy News

25 Jan 2020 12:46

Watsisname wrote:
midtskogen wrote:
Source of the post Speculations that this is a sign of imminent supernova are - highly speculative.

Quite.  It is a variable star, and we don't know if (or even expect, really) obvious changes in its brightness would correspond to changes in its core fusion processes.  I liken it to all the buzz that happens in the media whenever Yellowstone hiccups.  It has probably had hiccups since before modern humans came around, and we don't know what it does right before it goes off, or even if it does anything noticeable at all.

But it is neat that such a prominent star in the sky is now much dimmer than we've been used to.  The stars aren't constant. :)

Added:  Good news though is that, unlike Yellowstone, when Betelgeuse finally does blow up it will be spectacular and not dangerous.  At least to us.

Let's all place bets- what will explode first- Betelgeuse or Eta Carinae?  I predict that we will all either be 6 ft under by then or we will all reside in immortal artificial bodies by then!
 
User avatar
Stellarator
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 886
Joined: 10 Jul 2018
Location: Sagittarius A*

Science and Astronomy News

27 Jan 2020 01:30

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I predict that we will all either be 6 ft under by then or we will all reside in immortal artificial bodies by then!

Chances are good that if we'd survive up until then, those stars would have been diffused by us by some means along the lines of star-lifting.
Futurum Fusionem
 
User avatar
Salvo
Pioneer
Pioneer
Posts: 375
Joined: 03 Nov 2016
Location: Veneto, Italy
Contact:

Science and Astronomy News

27 Jan 2020 07:32

I think Eta Carinae already exploded and we're just waiting the GRB to reach us  8-)
The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition.

CPU: Intel Core i7 4770 GPU: Sapphire Radeon RX 570 RAM: 8 GBs
 
User avatar
JackDole
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 1828
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Location: Terra

Science and Astronomy News

27 Jan 2020 10:06

Stellarator wrote:
Source of the post hose stars would have been diffused by us by some means along the lines of star-lifting.

I have already considered whether the decrease in the brightness of Betelgeuse could not have been caused by a kind of star-lifting.
Not the 'normal' method, in which several new stars would be created next to Betelgeuse, we would be able to see that. Instead, the star matter would be absorbed by one or more wormholes and the new stars would be formed elsewhere.
(Possibly we could notice a change in diameter. Maybe we should take a closer look?)
8-)
JackDole's Universe 0.990: http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=546
JackDole's Archive: http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=419
JackDole: Mega structures ... http://old.spaceengine.org/forum/17-3252-1 (Old forum)
 
User avatar
midtskogen
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 1024
Joined: 11 Dec 2016
Location: Oslo, Norway
Contact:

Science and Astronomy News

27 Jan 2020 13:31

JackDole wrote:
Source of the post I have already considered whether the decrease in the brightness of Betelgeuse could not have been caused by a kind of star-lifting.

That sounds pretty ridiculous.  Even if you manage to focus the stellar mass quite a bit, it will still be a pretty thin soup to harvest.  Betelgeuse is practically made up of vacuum.  The density of Betelgeuse is 0.000000012 g/cm³.  On average, so less at shallow depths.   The average density is less than 1/100,000th the density of air at sea level on Earth, or roughly the pressure above Earth where "space" begins.  You need fairly decent equipment to achieve that kind of vacuum in a lab on Earth.
NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
User avatar
Stellarator
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 886
Joined: 10 Jul 2018
Location: Sagittarius A*

Science and Astronomy News

27 Jan 2020 17:42

midtskogen wrote:
JackDole wrote:
Source of the post I have already considered whether the decrease in the brightness of Betelgeuse could not have been caused by a kind of star-lifting.

That sounds pretty ridiculous.  Even if you manage to focus the stellar mass quite a bit, it will still be a pretty thin soup to harvest.  Betelgeuse is practically made up of vacuum.  The density of Betelgeuse is 0.000000012 g/cm³.  On average, so less at shallow depths.   The average density is less than 1/100,000th the density of air at sea level on Earth, or roughly the pressure above Earth where "space" begins.  You need fairly decent equipment to achieve that kind of vacuum in a lab on Earth.

Yeah, as a resource, Betelgeuse and other stars similar to it are pretty useless. The only reason I can think of as to why a large, advanced interstellar-civilization would bother using star-sheparding technology on it is if they wanted to nullify the effects of it's age, which is a pretty huge task considering the complexities involved. I say large interstellar civilization because they would be the only ones who'd have a real need to physically diffuse (or more conveniently, remove altogether - which of course we're NOT seeing) the star from their premises, and of course have the resources to do so. A smaller interstellar species (or nearby interplanetary civilization) would just construct a sun-shield around their solar-system facilities and ride out Betelgeuse's explosion, should it come to that. The latter method is just more efficient and easier to make.
Futurum Fusionem
 
User avatar
JackDole
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 1828
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Location: Terra

Science and Astronomy News

27 Jan 2020 22:39

Even if the outer sheaths of Betelgeuse are very thin, the core inside must inevitably be very solid. That is why the wormholes are positioned very close to the star core! (The high temperature probably won't harm the wormholes.)
Why do the aliens do this? They are doing this to save us!
We may have miscalculated, and Betegeuze explosion can do us harm.
(Of course they don't want to reveal themselves yet because we're not ready for them yet.)
(Just a thought. :lol:)
JackDole's Universe 0.990: http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=546
JackDole's Archive: http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=419
JackDole: Mega structures ... http://old.spaceengine.org/forum/17-3252-1 (Old forum)
 
User avatar
Watsisname
Science Officer
Science Officer
Posts: 1953
Joined: 06 Sep 2016
Location: Bellingham, WA

Science and Astronomy News

28 Jan 2020 00:06

JackDole wrote:
Source of the post (Possibly we could notice a change in diameter. Maybe we should take a closer look?)

Its size fluctuates naturally, like most giant stars.
 
A-L-E-X
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 2092
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

Science and Astronomy News

28 Jan 2020 15:16

Stellarator wrote:
midtskogen wrote:
JackDole wrote:
Source of the post I have already considered whether the decrease in the brightness of Betelgeuse could not have been caused by a kind of star-lifting.

That sounds pretty ridiculous.  Even if you manage to focus the stellar mass quite a bit, it will still be a pretty thin soup to harvest.  Betelgeuse is practically made up of vacuum.  The density of Betelgeuse is 0.000000012 g/cm³.  On average, so less at shallow depths.   The average density is less than 1/100,000th the density of air at sea level on Earth, or roughly the pressure above Earth where "space" begins.  You need fairly decent equipment to achieve that kind of vacuum in a lab on Earth.

Yeah, as a resource, Betelgeuse and other stars similar to it are pretty useless. The only reason I can think of as to why a large, advanced interstellar-civilization would bother using star-sheparding technology on it is if they wanted to nullify the effects of it's age, which is a pretty huge task considering the complexities involved. I say large interstellar civilization because they would be the only ones who'd have a real need to physically diffuse (or more conveniently, remove altogether - which of course we're NOT seeing) the star from their premises, and of course have the resources to do so. A smaller interstellar species (or nearby interplanetary civilization) would just construct a sun-shield around their solar-system facilities and ride out Betelgeuse's explosion, should it come to that. The latter method is just more efficient and easier to make.

Isn't there some weird star out there which seems to show variations that haven't been explained by natural means?  I forget its name....
 
User avatar
JackDole
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 1828
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Location: Terra

Science and Astronomy News

28 Jan 2020 20:21

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Isn't there some weird star out there which seems to show variations that haven't been explained by natural means?  I forget its name....

Do you mean 'KIC 8462852' (Tabby's Star)?
Sometimes it gets darker, sometimes brighter, in more or less regular intervals.
(A Dyson's sphere will probably be built there. But it is not yet finished, so these light fluctuations. :|)
scr00650.jpg
JackDole's Universe 0.990: http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=546
JackDole's Archive: http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=419
JackDole: Mega structures ... http://old.spaceengine.org/forum/17-3252-1 (Old forum)
 
User avatar
Stellarator
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 886
Joined: 10 Jul 2018
Location: Sagittarius A*

Science and Astronomy News

28 Jan 2020 20:52

JackDole wrote:
Source of the post (Of course they don't want to reveal themselves yet because we're not ready for them yet.)
(Just a thought. :lol:)

Aye, it's a fun thought. Other danger stars could be experiencing the same treatment near us!

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Isn't there some weird star out there which seems to show variations that haven't been explained by natural means?  I forget its name....

It's been pretty much disproved as a candidate for a partial Dyson swarm around a star. Although their odds aren't much better, there are other candidates that are more interesting:


As I said though, their odds of being extraterrestrial activity are still pretty slim, and it's far more likely that these were just super-flares of M-class stars observed during the telescope's scan.
Futurum Fusionem
 
User avatar
JackDole
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 1828
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Location: Terra

Science and Astronomy News

28 Jan 2020 21:35

The fluctuations in brightness around 'KIC 8462852' could possibly also be caused by dust clouds caused by intensive asteroid mining. Environmental pollution.
JackDole's Universe 0.990: http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=546
JackDole's Archive: http://forum.spaceengine.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=419
JackDole: Mega structures ... http://old.spaceengine.org/forum/17-3252-1 (Old forum)
 
User avatar
midtskogen
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 1024
Joined: 11 Dec 2016
Location: Oslo, Norway
Contact:

Science and Astronomy News

29 Jan 2020 00:39

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Isn't there some weird star out there which seems to show variations that haven't been explained by natural means?  I forget its name....

There are so many stars out there that there will also be some stars behaving in unusual ways.

The universe is big and extremely rare events happen all the time.  Consider this: In some star system out there, in some galaxy, two planets are colliding - right now as I type this.  And two other planets are also colliding when you read this.
NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
User avatar
Stellarator
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 886
Joined: 10 Jul 2018
Location: Sagittarius A*

Science and Astronomy News

29 Jan 2020 01:45

Exactly. It is in fact thought that the Tabby's Star fluctuations are caused by a disintegrating planet. There was a fairly statistically-insignificant chance of us actually viewing that as it happened, but it just goes to show how busy the universe is.
Futurum Fusionem
 
User avatar
Watsisname
Science Officer
Science Officer
Posts: 1953
Joined: 06 Sep 2016
Location: Bellingham, WA

Science and Astronomy News

29 Jan 2020 02:00

Stellarator wrote:
Source of the post It is in fact thought that the Tabby's Star fluctuations are caused by a disintegrating planet.

They are definitely related to dust and not some alien megastructure (due to wavelength dependence of the dimming which indicates scattering by particles with sizes comparable to visible wavelengths).  But not from a disintegrating planet or moon, or a violent collision in an asteroid belt.  Dust produced in those ways would be warm and produce a clear infrared excess, but no significant infrared excess is observed.  So the more likely explanation is a colder source of dust farther from the star.


midtskogen wrote:
Source of the post The universe is big and extremely rare events happen all the time.

That reminds me.  In an older version of Space Engine I came across this planet with two suns, in the middle of a double solar eclipse.  And I just thought "Wow. Statistically, this must actually be happening out there somewhere in the real universe."

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest