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03 Jan 2019 04:52

Gnargenox wrote:
UltimaThule

Who comes up with these crazy names lol?  UltimaThule?  Really?

And I wonder how soon these objects will be in SE?

Two new rogue planet candidates from microlensing, one of which is possibly between the mass of Earth and Neptune.

https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.00441

These recently discovered rogue planet candidates include OGLE-2012-BLG-1323, OGLE-2017-BLG-0560, and OGLE-2016-BLG-1540.
 
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03 Jan 2019 05:50

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Who comes up with these crazy names lol?  UltimaThule?  Really?

"Help us nickname a distant world"
"Ultima Thule" was one of my votes, mainly because of that "Space: 1999" episode, "Death's other dominion". The other one was Uluru, if I recall correctly.
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03 Jan 2019 17:46

It means "furthest unknown region" or "extremely distant land". Its a Germanic name that has its origins in Classical/medieval literature describing an unknown landmass or island beyond the British isles. It could have been the Shetlands, Iceland or even Greenland. For a Kuiper Belt object, this is a fitting name, but it is a bit mischaracterized. Ultima Thule Certainly isn't the furthest Kuiper belt - but it IS the farthest we'll photograph from a probe in a long while.

EDIT:

midtskogen wrote:
Source of the post Actually, the name Thule first appear in Greek by Pytheas (whose original work is lost, but referenced to by several ancient writers).  The origin of the name is unknown.  Since Pytheas visited Germanic tribes, it is of course possible that it has a Germanic origin, but I'm not aware of any good evidence for that.  Anyway, Pytheas sailed far north.  How far is difficult to say.  He described the midnight sun, the polar night and sea ice, but he could have reasoned his way to these descriptions of the Arctic.  Or he actually went to Norway, Iceland or Greenland.  Hard to tell.  If not, Thule could have been the Orkney islands, Hebdrides, Shetland or the Faroe Islands.  "Ultima" is Latin added later simply meaning "furthermost".  It seems clear that he at least circumnavigated Britain, and Thule is supposed to be six days north of Britain.  That could have taken him to Norway or possibly Iceland, but Thule is also supposed to be only one day from drift ice.  That sounds unlikely in Norway (some inner fjords freeze in winter, but that doesn't quite fit Pytheas' description of something as far as it's possible to get.  If he circumnavigated Iceland, ice can be reached within a day, but that sounds like a stretch.  If he regarded the Faroe Islands as the northernmost part of Britain, Iceland should be reachable within six days, but my guess is that Thule is some island north of Britain (many candidates, the Faroes the furthest), or Norway (Møre perhaps), and the ice and the midnight sun are extrapolations.

I second all of this. I learned more about the word after some internet searches :ugeek:.
Last edited by Stellarator on 04 Jan 2019 00:50, edited 1 time in total.
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04 Jan 2019 00:10

Actually, the name Thule first appear in Greek by Pytheas (whose original work is lost, but referenced to by several ancient writers).  The origin of the name is unknown.  Since Pytheas visited Germanic tribes, it is of course possible that it has a Germanic origin, but I'm not aware of any good evidence for that.  Anyway, Pytheas sailed far north.  How far is difficult to say.  He described the midnight sun, the polar night and sea ice, but he could have reasoned his way to these descriptions of the Arctic.  Or he actually went to Norway, Iceland or Greenland.  Hard to tell.  If not, Thule could have been the Orkney islands, Hebdrides, Shetland or the Faroe Islands.  "Ultima" is Latin added later simply meaning "furthermost".  It seems clear that he at least circumnavigated Britain, and Thule is supposed to be six days north of Britain.  That could have taken him to Norway or possibly Iceland, but Thule is also supposed to be only one day from drift ice.  That sounds unlikely in Norway (some inner fjords freeze in winter, but that doesn't quite fit Pytheas' description of something as far as it's possible to get.  If he circumnavigated Iceland, ice can be reached within a day, but that sounds like a stretch.  If he regarded the Faroe Islands as the northernmost part of Britain, Iceland should be reachable within six days, but my guess is that Thule is some island north of Britain (many candidates, the Faroes the furthest), or Norway (Møre perhaps), and the ice and the midnight sun are extrapolations.
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04 Jan 2019 00:43

Tbh that Chinese lander pic looks almost as if it were straight outta Space Engine :lol:
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04 Jan 2019 02:22

lol no wonder they were trying to ddos the site!

Anyway you're right about Thule, I actually thought they named if after Thule Air Base in Greenland and added Ultima to it as a sort of cool "video game"ish kind of name.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thule_Air_Base

Interesting stuff in there about World War 2 and a 1960s era nuclear accident that occurred there.
 
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04 Jan 2019 03:19

The name Thule is known since the 4th century BC, so slightly older than the Thule air base.

Somewhat off topic, I find it fascinating that the northern coast of Greenland was inhabited most of the time for a few millennia until the 1st century BC.  This is quite a bit further north than the air base, 82 degrees north, and further north than what is a home for anyone today.  That is indeed "ultima Thule" in the traditional sense.  The climate may have been milder then, but they still would have to deal with 4.5 months of polar night, of which more than two months are completely dark.
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05 Jan 2019 05:48

midtskogen wrote:
The name Thule is known since the 4th century BC, so slightly older than the Thule air base.

Somewhat off topic, I find it fascinating that the northern coast of Greenland was inhabited most of the time for a few millennia until the 1st century BC.  This is quite a bit further north than the air base, 82 degrees north, and further north than what is a home for anyone today.  That is indeed "ultima Thule" in the traditional sense.  The climate may have been milder then, but they still would have to deal with 4.5 months of polar night, of which more than two months are completely dark.

The most fascinating place in Greenland that I keep track of is Summit Camp which is at the top of the ice cap and keeps continuous temperature records.  In a very short time they have gotten close to the all-time coldest temperature ever recorded in the Northern Hemisphere (-90).
 
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05 Jan 2019 17:13

We [will] have terras and ferrias in SE, but it would be cool to introduce this new kind of terrestrial planets:

Reference to research

These are planets with aluminium and calcium cores, no magnetic field and would usually orbit very close to their star. some are referring them to "saphire" or "ruby" planets.
 
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19 Jan 2019 06:49

Perhaps this should be taken to the global warming thread?
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19 Jan 2019 10:48

midtskogen wrote:
Perhaps this should be taken to the global warming thread?

Done.

Please all make a small effort, for sake of discussion, in placing messages regarding whatever topic in its own existing thread, we have plenty.
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20 Jan 2019 18:27

a big super blood wolf moon thing lunar eclipse tonight (and whatever else they want to call it lol),  I am psyched and am charging the batteries of both my cameras!

https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/list.html

This qualifies as astronomy news, I think lol
 
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20 Jan 2019 21:18

Looking forward to see something in the astrophotography thread!

It's snowing here, no moon to be seen. The setting red moon would be a perfect object to photograph. :(
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23 Jan 2019 08:42

Apparently it may seem like we have 2 extra 'moons'. I find this a very interesting discovery.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/scie ... ets-space/
 
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23 Jan 2019 09:38

Sounds more like eddies of interplanetary dust and the name "moon" or "satellite" is misleading.  They're for practical purposes made up of vacuum, probably a far better vacuum than we can produce on Earth.  The interesting part is that it is possible to observe them.
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