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Gnargenox
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12 Sep 2018 10:28

A bit touchy-feely practicing their decent towards Ryugu last night.
Hayabusa2

"The first operation rehearsal for the first touchdown of Hayabusa2 began on September 10 and during September 11, the spacecraft descended towards Ryugu. Today (September 12), the spacecraft was approaching the planned lowest altitude in the descent when the spacecraft autonomously stopped descending at about 600 m, and started to rise. The cause was that the laser altimeter (LIDAR) became unable to measure the distance between the spacecraft and surface of the asteroid. LIDAR measures distance by reflecting a laser from the asteroid surface. A probable reason for this measurement becoming impossible is the low reflectance of the surface of Ryugu.

The condition of the spacecraft is normal and is today returning to the home position (about 20 km from the asteroid center). From tomorrow, we plan to revise the descent procedure, including a review of the LIDAR settings."

Plus my attempt at importing it. Elevations are not anywhere near correct.
scr03239.jpg
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N0B0DY
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20 Sep 2018 02:18

Spock’s World Found! Astronomers Discover Actual Planet Vulcan

https://trekmovie.com/2018/09/19/spocks ... et-vulcan/
 
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Watsisname
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20 Sep 2018 03:18

I was about to say it's nice to know Vulcan has not been turned into a black hole yet, but then realized it was detected by the radial velocity method, which cannot distinguish a planet-mass black hole from a regular planet. :P
 
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N0B0DY
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20 Sep 2018 07:36

Watsisname wrote:
I was about to say it's nice to know Vulcan has not been turned into a black hole yet, but then realized it was detected by the radial velocity method, which cannot distinguish a planet-mass black hole from a regular planet. :P

But planet-mass black holes are impossible to exist, right?
 
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Watsisname
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20 Sep 2018 16:16

N0B0DY wrote:
Source of the post But planet-mass black holes are impossible to exist, right?

I was joking about what happens to Vulcan in one of the Star Trek movies. ;)  In reality planet-mass black holes are absolutely possible, but probably not found in planet-like orbits.  Let's get the first (very artificial and probably not at all practical) method of forming one out of the way: if you manage to squeeze a planet down within its Schwarzschild radius (a centimeter or so), you will end up with a planet-mass black hole.

In nature, they could potentially exist as a population of primordial black holes formed shortly after the Big Bang.  This is also a possible explanation for the nature of dark matter (though they must have a specific distribution of sizes or else they would have already betrayed their presence in other ways, like gravitational microlensing events).

Planet-mass black holes are also inevitable in the distant future, from the evaporation of stellar-mass and larger black holes.

Right now the CMB radiation provides enough energy for any roughly planet-mass or larger black holes to grow rather than decay, but as the universe expands eventually this radiation will redshifted and diluted enough that all black holes will decay.  A 10 solar mass black hole will, without eating anything, evaporate to an Earth-mass black hole after about 2x1070 years.  Once down to Earth's mass it will last another 6x1050 years before evaporating completely in a flash of gamma rays.
 
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DoctorOfSpace
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20 Sep 2018 18:46

2x10^70 years, I'll put on the kettle then it's going to be quite the wait.
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20 Sep 2018 19:46

Watsisname wrote:
Source of the post Vulcan in one of the Star Trek movies

I do not acknowledge the existence of those movies :lol:. But I did watch that one before I knew better. Am I the only one who thinks those smug-bug Vulcan's had it coming? Probably.

That aside, I find it cool that a planet was found around 40 Eridani, since that was a star that had been on the radar for astronomers for finding potential exoplanets.  The question is, has the discovery actually been confirmed? I recall well the 'ghosts' of Alpha Centauri b and Gliese 581g.

I'd rather find a exoplanet orbiting Omega Leonis, the alleged star hosting Qo'noS  :evil:
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N0B0DY
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21 Sep 2018 13:19

Watsisname wrote:
N0B0DY wrote:
Source of the post But planet-mass black holes are impossible to exist, right?

I was joking about what happens to Vulcan in one of the Star Trek movies. ;)  In reality planet-mass black holes are absolutely possible, but probably not found in planet-like orbits.  Let's get the first (very artificial and probably not at all practical) method of forming one out of the way: if you manage to squeeze a planet down within its Schwarzschild radius (a centimeter or so), you will end up with a planet-mass black hole.

In nature, they could potentially exist as a population of primordial black holes formed shortly after the Big Bang.  This is also a possible explanation for the nature of dark matter (though they must have a specific distribution of sizes or else they would have already betrayed their presence in other ways, like gravitational microlensing events).

Planet-mass black holes are also inevitable in the distant future, from the evaporation of stellar-mass and larger black holes.

Right now the CMB radiation provides enough energy for any roughly planet-mass or larger black holes to grow rather than decay, but as the universe expands eventually this radiation will redshifted and diluted enough that all black holes will decay.  A 10 solar mass black hole will, without eating anything, evaporate to an Earth-mass black hole after about 2x1070 years.  Once down to Earth's mass it will last another 6x1050 years before evaporating completely in a flash of gamma rays.

Sorry Watsisname I thought they would be impossible because of my misinterpretation of this wiki article.
Yes I remember a star trek episode where planet vulcan is destroyed by a kind of mini black-hole producing weapon or something similar - I probably don't remember it very well. I remember it is when Lt Spock's mother dies in the process of this destruction because they fail to beam her up on the enterprise as she falls down as the planet disintegrates. Very emotional scene - I cried a lot :( .
 
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21 Sep 2018 20:42

N0B0DY wrote:
Source of the post Yes I remember a star trek episode where planet vulcan is destroyed

I'm pretty sure that was the 2009 JJ Abrams movie set in an 'alternate universe'. But as I said, those movies don't actually exist, so I know nothing  :?.
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21 Sep 2018 23:05

Stellarator wrote:
Watsisname wrote:
Source of the post Vulcan in one of the Star Trek movies

I do not acknowledge the existence of those movies :lol:. But I did watch that one before I knew better. Am I the only one who thinks those smug-bug Vulcan's had it coming? Probably.

That aside, I find it cool that a planet was found around 40 Eridani, since that was a star that had been on the radar for astronomers for finding potential exoplanets.  The question is, has the discovery actually been confirmed? I recall well the 'ghosts' of Alpha Centauri b and Gliese 581g.

I'd rather find a exoplanet orbiting Omega Leonis, the alleged star hosting Qo'noS  :evil:

Heh. I have my eyes set on Delta Trianguli, the Tatooine-style binary 35 ly out. :D
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22 Sep 2018 15:36

PlutonianEmpire wrote:
Source of the post I have my eyes set on Delta Trianguli, the Tatooine-style binary 35 ly out.

Sadly, desert planets orbiting double stars are a dime a dozen nowadays :cry:. Whether or not they are crawling with Banthas is another matter.

But you can have that planet PlutonianEmpire. If you need me, I'll be swigging Romulan ale with my Klingon brothers in the First City. Tell the sand people I said hi ;)
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Gnargenox
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24 Sep 2018 19:08

What's this!? Volcanic activity on Mars? Or did a meteorite land right on top of a dead volcano? I thought the Tharsis bulge was the last heave-ho Mars ever saw geologically speaking. Maybe I'll have to re-write some scripts and get the blood flowing again on our Martian neighbor's face.

Before photo of Tharsis Region, without any plume being carried away by the lower atmosphere
Tharsis Region on Aug 6th - no plume.png
Tharsis Region on Aug 6th - no plume.png (431.62 KiB) Viewed 362 times

September 23rd by Mars Express
Possible Plume on Arsia Mons.png
Possible Plume on Arsia Mons.png (373.1 KiB) Viewed 362 times

September 19th by Mars Express
Plume on Arsia Mons - 9-19-18.png
Plume on Arsia Mons - 9-19-18.png (382.97 KiB) Viewed 362 times

Speculations?

EDIT: Apparently it is just a meteorological effect of the volcano itself :( DRAT!
received_545401469247076.jpeg

----------------------------------------
NEXT!
Here's a photo taken by the rover MINERVA-II1A while hoping around on the asteroid Ryugu, about a day after landing.
MINERVA-II1A hoping around.jpeg
MINERVA-II1A hoping around.jpeg (34.71 KiB) Viewed 362 times

And a picture from MINERVA-II1B while descending, not too blurry.
MINERVA-II1B descent.jpeg
MINERVA-II1B descent.jpeg (21.63 KiB) Viewed 362 times

But the picture from MINERVA-II1A is because it was spinning a bit faster.
MINERVA-II1A descent.jpeg
MINERVA-II1A descent.jpeg (6.37 KiB) Viewed 362 times

---------------------------------------
FINAL BIT
One last bit of science news, Scientist have discovered that shining specially tuned light on Rydberg Hydrogen atoms (meaning highly energized with a single electron at 100s of times the normal distance of a resting electron orbit) which can cause it to form "Ghost bonds" with EMPTY SPACE! (as IF there was another atom at that location). They're actually called Trilobite bonds because of its elongated shape, similar to that of the prehistoric muck dweller. That's kinda like clapping with one hand. Neat trick.

Applications of this are highly speculative, but perhaps you could have a crystalline solid that turns to liquid then you light it up at just the right frequency. Exergonic reactions could become Endogonic. Work and energy put in a system could be swapped. Pencil lead could turn to diamond using a hand held pen light. The color of objects could change with the touch of a stylus. You could have chemical reactions take place without change in temperature or pressure. Useful in Quantum computing? Who knows.
Creation and observation of a ghost trilobite chemical bond - ARXIV PDF
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24 Sep 2018 23:51

That's pretty neat Gnargenox! Good find.

I like the way the last great volcanic activity on Mars died out at the same time as the dinosaurs did on Earth. 'Twas a time of tragedy for the whole solar-system :|.
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PlutonianEmpire
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25 Sep 2018 13:01

Stellarator wrote:
PlutonianEmpire wrote:
Source of the post I have my eyes set on Delta Trianguli, the Tatooine-style binary 35 ly out.

Sadly, desert planets orbiting double stars are a dime a dozen nowadays :cry:. Whether or not they are crawling with Banthas is another matter.

But you can have that planet PlutonianEmpire. If you need me, I'll be swigging Romulan ale with my Klingon brothers in the First City. Tell the sand people I said hi ;)


Not gonna stop me from hoping for a nice circumbinary jungle planet there instead, tbh ;)
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25 Sep 2018 17:48

PlutonianEmpire wrote:
Source of the post  jungle planet

Alien jungles are cool, but they always have nasty creepy-crawlies and horrid parasites and diseases in them. Just imagine an alien Ebola :? :oops:!
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