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Watsisname
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08 Feb 2017 05:01

Wow, that's a pretty big one.  I'd really like to see a well behaved tornado from a distance like that.
 
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Quontex
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08 Feb 2017 05:25

It's just planet earth doesn't want us to leave :D
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08 Feb 2017 05:28

"Wow! What a...a...I'll call it a tornado! I wonder if it will be my friend!"
The only thing that when through the facility's mind was "Oh no, not again"
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Hornblower
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11 Feb 2017 14:48

Looks like the landing site candidate list has been shortened. No Valles Marineris.  :(
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Watsisname
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11 Feb 2017 16:31

I'm not very surprised -- Valles Marineris is a really cool place with lots of science targets, but it's a risk manager's nightmare in terms of tolerance for error in landing. :(
 
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DoctorOfSpace
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11 Feb 2017 16:59

Watsisname wrote:
Source of the post but it's a risk manager's nightmare in terms of tolerance for error in landing

And the risks also continue long after landing
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11 Feb 2017 21:00

if so my choice is columbia hills. if i remember correctly spirit found interesting things there.
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Xoran
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13 Feb 2017 07:47

Watsisname wrote:
Source of the post I'm not very surprised -- Valles Marineris is a really cool place with lots of science targets, but it's a risk manager's nightmare in terms of tolerance for error in landing.


DoctorOfSpace wrote:
Source of the post And the risks also continue long after landing

Also, when humans terraform Mars, Valles Marineris is pretty low altitude, so a colony there would probably be swallowed by the water at some point.
However, it could be possible to land very close to Valles Marineris, so it is visible from the colony. That could also make the colony have water access, if Mars got terraformed.
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DoctorOfSpace
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13 Feb 2017 08:22

Xoran wrote:
Source of the post when humans terraform Mars, Valles Marineris is pretty low altitude, so a colony there would probably be swallowed by the water at some point.

I don't think we need to worry about what Mars might be like in another 1000 to 10,000 years.
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13 Feb 2017 08:31

Xoran wrote:
Source of the post Also, when humans terraform Mars, Valles Marineris is pretty low altitude, so a colony there would probably be swallowed by the water at some point.

Until Mars is so terraformed that water becomes a problem, it will certainly take a while.

I personally would prefer Valles Marineris for security reasons. I think that the bottom of the valley would be a certain protection against Mars storms. They can, as I have heard, be quite violent.
 
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Mosfet
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13 Feb 2017 10:36

As far as I know, the peculiarity of martian storms as of today is not the violence, it's the dust.
Mars atmosphere is thin, much less dense than Earth, it means very low pressure, less gas molecules, etc... so the energy of the air mass in motion  is a lot less than here. According to NASA, "The winds in the strongest Martian storms top out at about 60 miles per hour, less than half the speed of some hurricane-force winds on Earth".
Dust, on the other hand, goes everywhere and covers anything. It clogs mechanical parts, decreases solar panels efficiency.
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13 Feb 2017 23:31

A number of new planets found with the Radial Velocity method have been presented by the Keck-HIRES team. Among them is a Super-Earth in a 10-day orbit around Lalande 21185, the fourth closest star to our own.
HIRES_1.jpg

https://carnegiescience.edu/node/2141
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Xoran
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14 Feb 2017 03:37

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post A number of new planets found with the Radial Velocity method have been presented by the Keck-HIRES team. Among them is a Super-Earth in a 10-day orbit around Lalande 21185, the fourth closest star to our own.

Cool! Let's just hope that it is not an oceania :)
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Gnargenox
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14 Feb 2017 03:55

According to SE it is a Hot Desert lol
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Xoran
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14 Feb 2017 04:01

Gnargenox wrote:
Source of the post According to SE it is a Hot Desert lol

‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎. Even though the planet in SE is different, because the planet was discovered recently, for example Proxima Centauri b is not in Space Engine.
Also, it orbits around a M main sequence star, so why isn't it tidally locked?
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