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01 Jul 2017 02:35

NASA's Juno Spacecraft to Fly Over Jupiter's Great Red Spot July 10
This will be humanity's first up-close and personal view of the red spot
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06 Jul 2017 15:33

"Exploration is in our nature. We began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still"
-carl sagan
 
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06 Jul 2017 15:57

What causes the sun to have these 11 year cycles?
 
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Watsisname
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06 Jul 2017 19:40

Much of the physics behind it is still an active area of research, but the current theory that has emerged describes it with the "solar dynamo", which involves the interplay between magnetic fields and electric currents inside the Sun.  It's similar (though a lot more complicated) to the operation of an electric motor -- moving a conductor through a magnetic field produces currents, and this can be used to exchange energy or do work.

Here's some good additional information about it:

NASA Solar Physics page
 
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07 Jul 2017 08:17

Interesting. Fun read also. 
 
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07 Jul 2017 12:28

It's worth mentioning that the cycle that is now ending is the weakest for more than a hundred years,. Many predict the next cycle to be as weak or even weaker.  Such predictions are not yet certain science, though.

Some have tried to link solar cycles to climate.  In particular, the temperature seems to be correlated with the length of the previous cycle, but no quite satisfactory physical explanations exist, so the relationship remains unclear.  Some so-called climate sceptics think that the solar activity plays an important role, and some in the other camp don't quite shut that door either as a weak sun could explain why global warming falls a bit short of the projections.  The next cycle should give some hints, but personally I don't expect much to happen.  I think the current weakening of the sun will teach us more about the sun than climate-sun links.
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08 Jul 2017 02:56

I don't know if someone mentoned here something about Total Solar Eclipse that is happening now in August. But here is the link to some site. In case you weren't informed. :)
https://www.space.com/33797-total-solar-eclipse-2017-guide.html
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08 Jul 2017 06:40

Marko S. wrote:
Source of the post But here is the link to some site.

Thanks Marko S., there's indeed a thread for the eclipse, in Science and Astronomy Discussions > Total Solar Eclipse 2017. There are not many links to external resources, though, probably because discussions about the event started back at the old forum.
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08 Jul 2017 13:54

Mosfet wrote:
Marko S. wrote:
Source of the post But here is the link to some site.

Thanks Marko S., there's indeed a thread for the eclipse, in Science and Astronomy Discussions > Total Solar Eclipse 2017. There are not many links to external resources, though, probably because discussions about the event started back at the old forum.

Thank you for that inforamtion! I wasn't registered on the old site. I have been following Space Engine probably since 2014 (I don't remember) and I didn't register. Too bad that Total Eclipse is just in United States. I live here in Serbia and I hope that in the future I will get the chance of seeing the Total Eclipse. Thanks Mosfet!
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08 Jul 2017 20:15

Except for some who are very lucky, you have to wait a long time before a total solar eclipse will pass over or very close by.  Usually these are the kinds of things you have to travel to in order to see.  The average recurrence time for a total eclipse at any point on Earth is about 375 years!  For Serbia, the next total solar eclipse is not until 2081.

In your case I would try to plan for the August 2, 2027 solar eclipse, which will pass over the straight of Gibraltar, Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, and the point of Somalia.  It's the closest and probably most accessible total eclipse to you for a while.  It's also a very long eclipse -- more than 6 minutes of totality at maximum.

I'll also see about updating the OP of the 2017 eclipse thread with some maps and climate info for those interested. :)
 
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09 Jul 2017 03:17

Thank you! i hope I will live that long to witness the Total Eclipse 2081. :D You know how our world is strange place and a lot of things were happening over the past few years, so maybe there is going to happen another eclipse, but not total. I just hope. And that other Eclipse in 2027, well, It is not likely that I am going to visit Gibraltar. That is a period of 10 years from now, so maybe if I get the right opportunity. At least I can see your photos and videos of the Eclipse 2017 like others on the forum. :) So nice to be alive in this era xD
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09 Jul 2017 03:29

for what i see in wikipedia. here there won't be a full 100% solar eclipse in this century. the best ones will be 80% in the total eclipse of november 5,2059 and september 3, 2081. so in my lifetime i won't see a full 100% one atleast here, but i hope i will be able to travel one day.
and the one that watsisname wrote, august 2, 2027 will be 80-90% eclipse here  :)
in serbia there will be full eclipse in 2236. solar eclipe of 2236, may 6
for me there will be a full one in solar eclipse of 2241, august 8
Last edited by Spacer on 09 Jul 2017 03:46, edited 3 times in total.
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Marko S.
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09 Jul 2017 03:38

Lucky you, Spacer! If I only get a chance in future to visit other countries for Eclipses.
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09 Jul 2017 10:58

Have you guys heard about the Mayak satellite?
Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
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09 Jul 2017 13:29

No, but that's pretty interesting.  A -10 magnitude tumbling object would be awesome to see in the sky.  That's like having the brightest possible Iridium flare twinkling constantly.  You might even be able to see it in broad daylight.

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