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Gnargenox
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20 Mar 2017 01:08

I will either sleep as sound as a really, really heavy rock or hit the ceiling jumping out of a startling dream tonight!
Thank you!! AMAZING stuff every time.....
Now I'm starting to think Dark Matter really isn't made up of primordial multi-ton microscopic black holes.
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Watsisname
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20 Mar 2017 03:18

So, when I said I'll leave the question of the time it takes for the trillion-ton, atom-sized black hole to consume the Earth for another time...?  

Yeah, it's about a billion years.  Lol, I thought it would take a long time, but not THAT long.  The Eddington Limit really ...er... limits it, as it can only start out eating about a kilogram per second, and it pretty much stays that way until near the end.

The actual solution for how the black hole grows with time is an exponential of the form Image

where  Image

For this case, plotting the Earth's remaining mass over time gives a curve like this, where the y-axis is in kilograms and the x-axis is time in millions of years.

Image

Making the black hole more massive doesn't change the timescale a whole lot.  Even if we made the black hole the same mass as Earth, it still takes about 30 million years to truly consume Earth, though at least it has a more steady effect:

Image

Now I'm starting to think Dark Matter really isn't made up of primordial multi-ton microscopic black holes.


There could be some primordial microscopic black holes out there, and actually there are some researchers following the idea that it could explain much of the dark matter.  If so they must have a particular distribution of masses to be consistent with observations (or lack thereof). I think more astronomers are in the "new fundamental particle" mode, but either way the models can only benefit from more data at this point. :)
 
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DoctorOfSpace
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20 Mar 2017 08:24

Watsisname wrote:
Source of the post Even if we made the black hole the same mass as Earth, it still takes about 30 million years to truly consume Earth

At what point does Earth stop being capable of supporting life?  That seems to be the more interesting aspect of this and probably the hardest one to answer.
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Xoran
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20 Mar 2017 08:39

DoctorOfSpace wrote:
Source of the post At what point does Earth stop being capable of supporting life?  That seems to be the more interesting aspect of this and probably the hardest one to answer.

That depends on what you mean with "life", because it will be uninhabitable to humans long before it is uninhabitable to bacteria.
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PlutonianEmpire
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20 Mar 2017 13:06

How big would our black hole need to be to consume Earth in 10 minutes or less? And/or one minute or less?
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Canleskis
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20 Mar 2017 13:20

PlutonianEmpire wrote:
How big would our black hole need to be to consume Earth in 10 minutes or less? And/or one minute or less?

Not exactly what you asked but :

 
 
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Banana
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22 Mar 2017 16:33

I wonder how people would react to a black hole suddenly appearing and beginning to slowly devour Earth. Hopefully nobody would try to jump into it.
Bananas are eggcellent.

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