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Starlight Glimmer
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15 Jul 2017 12:40

the photo guy wrote:
Starlight Glimmer wrote:
the photo guy wrote:
that's cooooool! But if earth was the moon of a gas giant, what would the behavior of earth be like? first id say that the tides would be a lot bigger right? But would the weather change? or even worse would earth be tidally locked to the gas giant? I'm not like a astrophysicists, so its just my curiosity. love to talk about it.   

The gas giant would cause no tides because Earth would be tidal locked. Only tidal forces would be because of other moons orbiting the gas giant and the sun. I'd imagine more volcanoes, and worse storms. The planet would rotate once every 36 hours. 

depending where the gas giants main star is the planets (or in this case the moon) temp would have a very big pattern right? Because half the time it takes for the moon to orbit the gas giant the star will show its face to the moon but the ether half of the orbit the star would be hidden behind the gas giant right? just for example lets say it takes 10 hours to orbit, 5 hours it will be hit with sun light and the ether 5 hours will be hit with only the gas giants light. unless the obit is at a angle of course. I wonder how we would deal with that... 

We would deal with it. We would adapt to it I'd imagine.
 
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15 Jul 2017 12:43

Starlight Glimmer wrote:
the photo guy wrote:
Starlight Glimmer wrote:
The gas giant would cause no tides because Earth would be tidal locked. Only tidal forces would be because of other moons orbiting the gas giant and the sun. I'd imagine more volcanoes, and worse storms. The planet would rotate once every 36 hours. 

depending where the gas giants main star is the planets (or in this case the moon) temp would have a very big pattern right? Because half the time it takes for the moon to orbit the gas giant the star will show its face to the moon but the ether half of the orbit the star would be hidden behind the gas giant right? just for example lets say it takes 10 hours to orbit, 5 hours it will be hit with sun light and the ether 5 hours will be hit with only the gas giants light. unless the obit is at a angle of course. I wonder how we would deal with that... 

We would deal with it. We would adapt to it I'd imagine.

fair. Be cool to have a big gas giant in the sky. I'm not all to smart with the space stuff but I'm trying. this was a fun little conversation :)
HI! I would like to say that I'm just a friendly teen who loves talking and helping people out :) Space engine is truly a wonderful program and the website is also very cool! Many great people here. I hope to make some good friends here.
 
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Marko S.
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15 Jul 2017 12:48

the photo guy wrote:
Source of the post that's cooooool! But if earth was the moon of a gas giant, what would the behavior of earth be like? first id say that the tides would be a lot bigger right? But would the weather change? or even worse would earth be tidally locked to the gas giant? I'm not like a astrophysicists, so its just my curiosity. love to talk about it.

it's good that you have that curiosity! You can be astrophysicist if you have enough will. :)
You are right about tides. They would be high. Weather would of course change. I don't know what aspects would change, but life would be different. I think there would be more volcano activity. Same thing happens with Io, it has a lot of volcanic activity just because Jupiters gravity. And it would be tidally locked! That's not good news for Earth. There are several Jupiters moons that are tidally locked. So, Earth would probably be also. But, if we say Earth is Jupiters moon on the current Solar System, water from Earth would be frozen. That's because, of course, it is 778.000.000 km away from the Sun. Life would almost be impossible.
It's good that you love to talk about space! You would be great astrophysicist! You should join NASA or be on some universities. :lol: I am not even joking lol.

Starlight Glimmer wrote:
Source of the post It does not function like Universe Sandbox. If you wanna read up on creating mods, its better to go to the manual. It knows more than I.
If Earth was the moon of a gas planet, we would have something like this.

Manual: http://spaceengine.org/manual/making-addons/introduction/

Thanks for the info and photos! Love it. Try with some other planets too! Or even, try with 3 planets at the same time! If it's possible. lol 
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We use time just to orientate through space.
 
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Marko S.
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15 Jul 2017 12:55

JackDole wrote:
Marko S.,
in this system, the distance between Earth and Venus is about 384394 km, the same as the distance Earth-Moon in SpaceEngine. The short SemiMajorAxis is 172607 km, the long is 211787 km.

Thanks! Almost the same as mine calculations!
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15 Jul 2017 12:57

Marko S. wrote:
the photo guy wrote:
Source of the post that's cooooool! But if earth was the moon of a gas giant, what would the behavior of earth be like? first id say that the tides would be a lot bigger right? But would the weather change? or even worse would earth be tidally locked to the gas giant? I'm not like a astrophysicists, so its just my curiosity. love to talk about it.

it's good that you have that curiosity! You can be astrophysicist if you have enough will. :)
You are right about tides. They would be high. Weather would of course change. I don't know what aspects would change, but life would be different. I think there would be more volcano activity. Same thing happens with Io, it has a lot of volcanic activity just because Jupiters gravity. And it would be tidally locked! That's not good news for Earth. There are several Jupiters moons that are tidally locked. So, Earth would probably be also. But, if we say Earth is Jupiters moon on the current Solar System, water from Earth would be frozen. That's because, of course, it is 778.000.000 km away from the Sun. Life would almost be impossible.
It's good that you love to talk about space! You would be great astrophysicist! You should join NASA or be on some universities. :lol: I am not even joking lol.

Starlight Glimmer wrote:
Source of the post It does not function like Universe Sandbox. If you wanna read up on creating mods, its better to go to the manual. It knows more than I.
If Earth was the moon of a gas planet, we would have something like this.

Manual: http://spaceengine.org/manual/making-addons/introduction/

Thanks for the info and photos! Love it. Try with some other planets too! Or even, try with 3 planets at the same time! If it's possible. lol 

Neptune mass planet would be smaller in the sky. Would orbit once every 6.1 days.  
 
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15 Jul 2017 13:00

Marko S. wrote:
the photo guy wrote:
Source of the post that's cooooool! But if earth was the moon of a gas giant, what would the behavior of earth be like? first id say that the tides would be a lot bigger right? But would the weather change? or even worse would earth be tidally locked to the gas giant? I'm not like a astrophysicists, so its just my curiosity. love to talk about it.

it's good that you have that curiosity! You can be astrophysicist if you have enough will. :)
You are right about tides. They would be high. Weather would of course change. I don't know what aspects would change, but life would be different. I think there would be more volcano activity. Same thing happens with Io, it has a lot of volcanic activity just because Jupiters gravity. And it would be tidally locked! That's not good news for Earth. There are several Jupiters moons that are tidally locked. So, Earth would probably be also. But, if we say Earth is Jupiters moon on the current Solar System, water from Earth would be frozen. That's because, of course, it is 778.000.000 km away from the Sun. Life would almost be impossible.
It's good that you love to talk about space! You would be great astrophysicist! You should join NASA or be on some universities. :lol: I am not even joking lol.

Starlight Glimmer wrote:
Source of the post It does not function like Universe Sandbox. If you wanna read up on creating mods, its better to go to the manual. It knows more than I.
If Earth was the moon of a gas planet, we would have something like this.

Manual: http://spaceengine.org/manual/making-addons/introduction/

Thanks for the info and photos! Love it. Try with some other planets too! Or even, try with 3 planets at the same time! If it's possible. lol 

oh come on Marko S. your being too nice :D :) & thanks truly!! but assuming that earth has the same mass and radius its gravity is still 1.0G. Jupiter is about 2.5G that means earth has almost half the gravity as Jupiter! would that effect the orbit of its moons and even maybe the orbit of Jupiter?    
HI! I would like to say that I'm just a friendly teen who loves talking and helping people out :) Space engine is truly a wonderful program and the website is also very cool! Many great people here. I hope to make some good friends here.
 
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Marko S.
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15 Jul 2017 13:04

Starlight Glimmer wrote:
Marko S. wrote:
the photo guy wrote:
Source of the post that's cooooool! But if earth was the moon of a gas giant, what would the behavior of earth be like? first id say that the tides would be a lot bigger right? But would the weather change? or even worse would earth be tidally locked to the gas giant? I'm not like a astrophysicists, so its just my curiosity. love to talk about it.

it's good that you have that curiosity! You can be astrophysicist if you have enough will. :)
You are right about tides. They would be high. Weather would of course change. I don't know what aspects would change, but life would be different. I think there would be more volcano activity. Same thing happens with Io, it has a lot of volcanic activity just because Jupiters gravity. And it would be tidally locked! That's not good news for Earth. There are several Jupiters moons that are tidally locked. So, Earth would probably be also. But, if we say Earth is Jupiters moon on the current Solar System, water from Earth would be frozen. That's because, of course, it is 778.000.000 km away from the Sun. Life would almost be impossible.
It's good that you love to talk about space! You would be great astrophysicist! You should join NASA or be on some universities. :lol: I am not even joking lol.

Starlight Glimmer wrote:
Source of the post It does not function like Universe Sandbox. If you wanna read up on creating mods, its better to go to the manual. It knows more than I.
If Earth was the moon of a gas planet, we would have something like this.

Manual: http://spaceengine.org/manual/making-addons/introduction/

Thanks for the info and photos! Love it. Try with some other planets too! Or even, try with 3 planets at the same time! If it's possible. lol 

Neptune mass planet would be smaller in the sky. Would orbit once every 6.1 days.  

Every 6.1 days? Does that mean that that is like whole month for Neptune? But, does it matter of what speed Earth is travelling? Because if it is slower then it would orbit in more days and opposite for faster speed? 
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We use time just to orientate through space.
 
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15 Jul 2017 13:08

Marko S. wrote:
Starlight Glimmer wrote:
Marko S. wrote:
it's good that you have that curiosity! You can be astrophysicist if you have enough will. :)
You are right about tides. They would be high. Weather would of course change. I don't know what aspects would change, but life would be different. I think there would be more volcano activity. Same thing happens with Io, it has a lot of volcanic activity just because Jupiters gravity. And it would be tidally locked! That's not good news for Earth. There are several Jupiters moons that are tidally locked. So, Earth would probably be also. But, if we say Earth is Jupiters moon on the current Solar System, water from Earth would be frozen. That's because, of course, it is 778.000.000 km away from the Sun. Life would almost be impossible.
It's good that you love to talk about space! You would be great astrophysicist! You should join NASA or be on some universities. :lol: I am not even joking lol.


Thanks for the info and photos! Love it. Try with some other planets too! Or even, try with 3 planets at the same time! If it's possible. lol 

Neptune mass planet would be smaller in the sky. Would orbit once every 6.1 days.  

Every 6.1 days? Does that mean that that is like whole month for Neptune? But, does it matter of what speed Earth is travelling? Because if it is slower then it would orbit in more days and opposite for faster speed? 

Not Neptune. Just a neptune mass planet. It does matter. Your right on that. The gravity pulls Earth faster, so it orbits faster.
 
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15 Jul 2017 13:30

the photo guy wrote:
Marko S. wrote:
the photo guy wrote:
Source of the post that's cooooool! But if earth was the moon of a gas giant, what would the behavior of earth be like? first id say that the tides would be a lot bigger right? But would the weather change? or even worse would earth be tidally locked to the gas giant? I'm not like a astrophysicists, so its just my curiosity. love to talk about it.

it's good that you have that curiosity! You can be astrophysicist if you have enough will. :)
You are right about tides. They would be high. Weather would of course change. I don't know what aspects would change, but life would be different. I think there would be more volcano activity. Same thing happens with Io, it has a lot of volcanic activity just because Jupiters gravity. And it would be tidally locked! That's not good news for Earth. There are several Jupiters moons that are tidally locked. So, Earth would probably be also. But, if we say Earth is Jupiters moon on the current Solar System, water from Earth would be frozen. That's because, of course, it is 778.000.000 km away from the Sun. Life would almost be impossible.
It's good that you love to talk about space! You would be great astrophysicist! You should join NASA or be on some universities. :lol: I am not even joking lol.

Starlight Glimmer wrote:
Source of the post It does not function like Universe Sandbox. If you wanna read up on creating mods, its better to go to the manual. It knows more than I.
If Earth was the moon of a gas planet, we would have something like this.

Manual: http://spaceengine.org/manual/making-addons/introduction/

Thanks for the info and photos! Love it. Try with some other planets too! Or even, try with 3 planets at the same time! If it's possible. lol 

oh come on Marko S. your being too nice :D :) & thanks truly!! but assuming that earth has the same mass and radius its gravity is still 1.0G. Jupiter is about 2.5G that means earth has almost half the gravity as Jupiter! would that effect the orbit of its moons and even maybe the orbit of Jupiter?    

I have to be nice to people that are nice (It said that in your signature lol)! And I am a little bit confused about Earth's 1G and Jupiter's 2.5G. Whit, I figured it out, lol. Now I am not confused, I thought you are telling in m/s2. For the effect, of course it effects! Every object that has mass, no matter how small, has effect on other objects in space. Since Earth is bigger than All those Moons and has bigger gravity, it will pull it towards it. But, it depends on the distance of the moons and Earth.
But there is actually that really confuses me. And that's: How can those moons and rings be in stable orbit, and not collide with planet, but some asteroids that are far away, still are getting pulled and they collide? How can that asteroid somehow get in the Jupiters orbit? I looked at the 2D space model like this, and it explains somehow that:
Some pic I found.gif
Some pic I found.gif (78.91 KiB) Viewed 103 times

This is simple General Relativity. But there's something that bothers me about this.
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We use time just to orientate through space.
 
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15 Jul 2017 13:41

Marko S. wrote:
the photo guy wrote:
Marko S. wrote:
it's good that you have that curiosity! You can be astrophysicist if you have enough will. :)
You are right about tides. They would be high. Weather would of course change. I don't know what aspects would change, but life would be different. I think there would be more volcano activity. Same thing happens with Io, it has a lot of volcanic activity just because Jupiters gravity. And it would be tidally locked! That's not good news for Earth. There are several Jupiters moons that are tidally locked. So, Earth would probably be also. But, if we say Earth is Jupiters moon on the current Solar System, water from Earth would be frozen. That's because, of course, it is 778.000.000 km away from the Sun. Life would almost be impossible.
It's good that you love to talk about space! You would be great astrophysicist! You should join NASA or be on some universities. :lol: I am not even joking lol.


Thanks for the info and photos! Love it. Try with some other planets too! Or even, try with 3 planets at the same time! If it's possible. lol 

oh come on Marko S. your being too nice :D :) & thanks truly!! but assuming that earth has the same mass and radius its gravity is still 1.0G. Jupiter is about 2.5G that means earth has almost half the gravity as Jupiter! would that effect the orbit of its moons and even maybe the orbit of Jupiter?    

I have to be nice to people that are nice (It said that in your signature lol)! And I am a little bit confused about Earth's 1G and Jupiter's 2.5G. Whit, I figured it out, lol. Now I am not confused, I thought you are telling in m/s2. For the effect, of course it effects! Every object that has mass, no matter how small, has effect on other objects in space. Since Earth is bigger than All those Moons and has bigger gravity, it will pull it towards it. But, it depends on the distance of the moons and Earth.
But there is actually that really confuses me. And that's: How can those moons and rings be in stable orbit, and not collide with planet, but some asteroids that are far away, still are getting pulled and they collide? How can that asteroid somehow get in the Jupiters orbit? I looked at the 2D space model like this, and it explains somehow that:
Some pic I found.gif
This is simple General Relativity. But there's something that bothers me about this.

its a good question. what I think is that we need to think about the solar system and not just the one planet. we know that even the littlest of gravity (like 0.00001 M/s) Can have an effect on any object right? after all the sun has a gravitational pull of about 28G's but at a distance of 150 million Km the earth can still fall to it at a fast speed. (keeping in mind that the gravitational pull of the sun from that distance is about 0.0006G's) and even then we still have Neptune that's like infinity far away and it also falls to the sun. so what I think is that one there is an asteroid falling towards or orbiting the sun, when an asteroid gets close to another object. even though its mass is smaller, its gravitational influence is greater because its closer. and since Jupiter is close to the asteroid belt and has bigger mass then mars, the asteroids orbital path are thrown to the planet. but that's just a theory...A SPACE THEOORRY.
but that being said the asteroid could also be slow down by the sun and the moons of Jupiter and even the planets, because of that it sorta doges the gas giant and then comes back and then slightly doges it aging. I believe THAT is what gives it an orbit. A perfectly circular orbit is a mystery but I would explain an elliptical one. this could also go for history one the solar system was in early stages. and that made some of the moons.     
Last edited by the photo guy on 15 Jul 2017 13:56, edited 3 times in total.
HI! I would like to say that I'm just a friendly teen who loves talking and helping people out :) Space engine is truly a wonderful program and the website is also very cool! Many great people here. I hope to make some good friends here.
 
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Watsisname
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15 Jul 2017 13:41

Marko S. wrote:
Source of the post Firstly, I'll explain why I don't believe in the Big Bang theory. I'll probably miss something, but never mind.
Ok, first question is when did it happen? It is speculated that Big Bang happened 13.8 billion years ago.

The age of the universe is not speculation.  It is measurable. :)

There are two approaches.  Since the universe must be older than the oldest things we can find in it, one approach is to measure the ages of the oldest things that you can find.  The oldest objects with easily measurable ages in the universe are globular clusters. You can measure their ages using the fact that the stars inside them all formed at nearly the same time, and the more massive stars evolve off the main sequence first.  This is the "main sequence turnoff".

These observations indicate that the best estimate for the oldest globular clusters are 13.5 +/- 2 billion years old, with a 99% confidence level of it being greater than 10 billion years and less than 16 billion years.  So this right away tells you the universe is pretty old -- at least twice the age of the Earth according to the geologists, and consistent with what you heard of it being about 13.8 billion years.  But as you can see, the uncertainties in this measurement are fairly large (several billion years).  We can do better.

A second method, which is much more precise, is to use the physics of the expansion.  If it is expanding, then everything must have been closer together in the past.  Here's the brilliant part that lets us do an age measurement: if the expansion is homogeneous (same everywhere), and if the relationship between the recession velocity to distance is linear, then you can simply take the inverse of the expansion rate (which has units of distance per time per distance, e.g. kilometers per second per megaparsec), and you'll get the time that has elapsed since everything was together (the Big Bang).  

This calculation does of course assume the expansion had proceeded from such a state, and we test that assumption (it makes a number of predictions).  That is actually how we know the universe began with the Big Bang, and I'll get back to this point in a moment.

For now, let's assume (incorrectly) that the expansion rate is constant.  Then the age of the universe will be the inverse of the expansion rate (Hubble's constant), which we measure to be about 68km/s/Mpc.  Let's calculate that in Wolfram Alpha and convert it to years:

► Show Spoiler


About 14.4 billion years.  Not bad!  But this is actually wrong, because the assumption that the expansion rate is constant is wrong.  It changes over time depending on the densities of matter and energy in the universe, which we can compute precisely from the equations of general relativity (specifically, the Friedmann equations for a homogeneous universe).  These equations describe the expansion rate, and its derivative (the acceleration) as a function of the size ("scale factor") of the universe, and you can use them to compute the age more precisely if you know the cosmological parameters -- which we can measure.  This is what gives us the much more precise age of 13.8 billion years.

Ok, back to the assumption of the expansion proceeding from a singularity state.  This is an extrapolation of the expansion to where the universe is of zero size.  That extrapolation makes predictions, because the properties and appearance of the universe as we see it today will depend on how it evolved.  For example, it predicts that when the universe was younger than about 370,000 years (a tiny fraction of its current age), the density and temperature would have been so high that atoms could not have formed.  Electrons would be immediately ripped from the nuclei.  All the free electrons would scatter the light and the universe would be a hot opaque fog.  

Once it expanded and cooled enough for the electrons to combine with nuclei to form atoms (what astronomers call "recombination" for some silly reason, even though it's the first time it happened), then the universe became transparent and the light was free to propagate through space. 

This is a prediction.  It has observable implications.  It tells us that we should still see this light in the form of a uniform background radiation, redshifted by the expansion of the universe since that time.  Indeed, this is exactly what we observe as the CMB, which was discovered quite by accident by Penzias and Wilson in the 1960s and they won the Nobel Prize for it.  This was the key observation that verified the Big Bang theory over the leading alternative model (the Steady State model).

The Big Bang theory makes a number of other predictions as well.  For example, it explains the relative abundances of elements, through the process of nucleosynthesis when the universe was less than a few minutes old.  It also predicts the existence of a "CNB", or cosmic neutrino background, formed when the universe was less than 2 seconds old.  But this one is much more difficult to observe since it is very weak and neutrinos are very ghostly particles.

Marko S. wrote:
Source of the post We 'have' time, now where did it happen? It is not sure where it happened.

It happened everywhere! The Big Bang is the expansion of space itself from a small, hot, dense initial state, and it was hot and dense at all points in space.  Everywhere you look, you look at something which participated in the Big Bang. :)

Marko S. wrote:
Source of the post But, it 'can' be explained with Hubbles Universe and Space expantion. Where everything look like it is moving away from you.

Not just "looks like".  Literally is.  This is a general relativistic effect where the space itself is expanding on large scales, and it is readily testable.  No other model has been able to explain these observations.

Marko S. wrote:
Source of the post Now more complex question: Why? Why did it happen and also, how?

Do we need to know the why or the how in order to know that something happened?  If I find a giant crater in a desert surrounded by shattered rock fragments, I can be pretty sure something violent happened there, even if I don't know exactly how or why it happened.

Sure, we would like to know the how, but physics does not take us back before the initial singularity of the Big Bang.  The Big Bang theory does not describe why or how the Big Bang originated, or what if anything happened before then.  It describes how the universe has evolved from that hot dense state.

You can believe God began the universe with the Big Bang if you like -- there is no discrepancy between this idea and with science or observations. :)

I hope that helps explain some about cosmology and the Big Bang for you.  If you still have doubts or if something is unclear feel free to ask more questions!
 
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15 Jul 2017 14:13

Marko S. wrote:
Source of the post But there is actually that really confuses me. And that's: How can those moons and rings be in stable orbit, and not collide with planet, but some asteroids that are far away, still are getting pulled and they collide? How can that asteroid somehow get in the Jupiters orbit?

Ah, orbital mechanics can be non-intuitive.  Think of Jupiter's gravitational field as a well, like in your image.  The moons and rings all orbit within that well, and the orbits are quite stable.  They have too little energy to escape, and they also don't collide with it because there is no significant forces to dissipate their orbital energy and make them spiral in.

So how does Jupiter still pull in asteroids or comets from far away?  It actually isn't!  They are orbiting the Sun, and either the orbit already crossed Jupiter and Jupiter happened to be in the way, or the orbit was perturbed a little bit over time (all the planets nudge the orbit very slightly, and this effect can slowly accumulate) and eventually it ended up crossing Jupiter.

This little bit of nudging doesn't affect the moons and rings much because they are too tightly bound to Jupiter for the effect to accumulate.  In a similar way, the Sun's gravity affects our Moon's orbit, but it is still too strongly bound to Earth for the Sun to pull it away.  (Its orbit is also expanding, but that's because of tidal interactions with the Earth).
 
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15 Jul 2017 14:23

Watsisname wrote:
Marko S. wrote:
Source of the post But there is actually that really confuses me. And that's: How can those moons and rings be in stable orbit, and not collide with planet, but some asteroids that are far away, still are getting pulled and they collide? How can that asteroid somehow get in the Jupiters orbit?

Ah, orbital mechanics can be non-intuitive.  Think of Jupiter's gravitational field as a well, like in your image.  The moons and rings all orbit within that well, and the orbits are quite stable.  They have too little energy to escape, and they also don't collide with it because there is no significant forces to dissipate their orbital energy and make them spiral in.

So how does Jupiter still pull in asteroids or comets from far away?  It actually isn't!  They are orbiting the Sun, and either the orbit already crossed Jupiter and Jupiter happened to be in the way, or the orbit was perturbed a little bit over time (all the planets nudge the orbit very slightly, and this effect can slowly accumulate) and eventually it ended up crossing Jupiter.

This little bit of nudging doesn't affect the moons and rings much because they are too tightly bound to Jupiter for the effect to accumulate.  In a similar way, the Sun's gravity affects our Moon's orbit, but it is still too strongly bound to Earth for the Sun to pull it away.  (Its orbit is also expanding, but that's because of tidal interactions with the Earth).

Wait are you saying that Jupiter DOSNT pull in comets and asteroids intel they are really close? so Jupiter isn't actually protecting earth from asteroids its just that the orbits of them decay from there natural orbit and get close to Jupiter's? my life is a lie. either that or I'm just really stupid & don't know what I'm talking about... either one works
HI! I would like to say that I'm just a friendly teen who loves talking and helping people out :) Space engine is truly a wonderful program and the website is also very cool! Many great people here. I hope to make some good friends here.
 
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Marko S.
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Science and Astronomy Questions

15 Jul 2017 14:27

the photo guy wrote:
Source of the post Wait are you saying that Jupiter DOSNT pull in comets and asteroids intel they are really close? so Jupiter isn't actually protecting earth from asteroids its just that the orbits of them decay from there natural orbit and get close to Jupiter's? my life is a lie. either that or I'm just really stupid & don't know what I'm talking about... either one works

Actually, he is right. I am currently responding to his answer so... But the thing can be explained by General Relativity.
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We use time just to orientate through space.
 
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the photo guy
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15 Jul 2017 14:33

Marko S. wrote:
the photo guy wrote:
Source of the post Wait are you saying that Jupiter DOSNT pull in comets and asteroids intel they are really close? so Jupiter isn't actually protecting earth from asteroids its just that the orbits of them decay from there natural orbit and get close to Jupiter's? my life is a lie. either that or I'm just really stupid & don't know what I'm talking about... either one works

Actually, he is right. I am currently responding to his answer so... But the thing can be explained by General Relativity.

The only thing I know good about relativity is time dilation that's it XD oh well in still learning.
HI! I would like to say that I'm just a friendly teen who loves talking and helping people out :) Space engine is truly a wonderful program and the website is also very cool! Many great people here. I hope to make some good friends here.

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