Ultimate space simulation software

 
User avatar
Stellarator
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 874
Joined: 10 Jul 2018
Location: Sagittarius A*

Astrophotography

09 Dec 2018 01:50

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post When the weather is really cold and I dont want to go outside,

What true amateur astronomer notices the cold if their eyeball is squished against a lens, staring at the Orion Nebula :P?

Anyway, you're really lucky with all your windows - on a clear night without glass condensation I can usually see the dim constellations of Ophiuchus and the Serpens Caput & Cauda.

Ha, you just reminded me of this one time when I was a kid and I use my 12 inch reflector in my parents living room to observe Mars at opposition.    
Futurum Fusionem
 
A-L-E-X
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 1725
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

Astrophotography

09 Dec 2018 02:03

Stellarator wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post When the weather is really cold and I dont want to go outside,

What true amateur astronomer notices the cold if their eyeball is squished against a lens, staring at the Orion Nebula :P?

Anyway, you're really lucky with all your windows - on a clear night without glass condensation I can usually see the dim constellations of Ophiuchus and the Serpens Caput & Cauda.

Ha, you just reminded me of this one time when I was a kid and I use my 12 inch reflector in my parents living room to observe Mars at opposition.    

One of the reasons I rail about overpopulation and the unhealthy high population density of cities is because I grew up in NY and it is so hard to see any stars around here :( I remember when I was in middle school I used to get so infuriated I considered throwing bricks at street lamps and then thought better of it.  It's also for health reasons, with all the lights outside it's really hard to get a good night's sleep.  There is a post office a block away which has a parking lot with a huge strobing light and then there is a neighbor with a motion detector and whenever the breeze picks up the lights in his yard turn on.  I actually need those binoculars or a telescope to see anything more than a few of the brightest stars.  When I go to the mountains, wow, I see things I have never seen before.  I had never seen the Milky Way until I took my first trip out there, sad to say.  I also sleep and breathe much better there, as a matter of fact, I sleep so deeply when I'm up in the mountains it feels like I was drugged, except it's not that artificial energy zapping groggy kind of sleep, it's the kind where you wake up invigorated and energized.
One of the good things about NY is we have a fracking ban here, unfortunately that is not the case in my mountain second home in PA, where I have heard that people are moving out because the pollution is horrible in other counties where its occurring and the fossil fuel companies have taken over, but fortunately it hasn't occurred in my particular county and probably wont because they put a moratorium on it.  Dont want that pollution and plus I see it's caused earthquakes in Oklahoma and that's the last thing I want to see.  I experienced my one earthquake in NY in 2011 and that was enough for me lol.

Haha I get very cold very easily, I'm much more of a summer guy, although I love the snow.  In my other home in the mountains I can sit in the balcony to star gaze even when it's very cold, but if the wind is blowing it's difficult to be out there more than 10 min or so.
 
User avatar
Stellarator
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 874
Joined: 10 Jul 2018
Location: Sagittarius A*

Astrophotography

09 Dec 2018 02:10

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I grew up in NY and it is so hard to see any stars around here :(

I was always deeply depressed when I had to work in the cities or other such high-ambient environments for those exact reasons. My beloved astronomy hobby had to be put on hold for the duration of my stay, plus I was just too exhausted at night to do any casual binocular sessions. And yes, camping out in the mountains really does zen you right out.
Futurum Fusionem
 
A-L-E-X
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 1725
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

Astrophotography

09 Dec 2018 02:21

Stellarator wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I grew up in NY and it is so hard to see any stars around here :(

I was always deeply depressed when I had to work in the cities or other such high-ambient environments for those exact reasons. My beloved astronomy hobby had to be put on hold for the duration of my stay, plus I was just too exhausted at night to do any casual binocular sessions. And yes, camping out in the mountains really does zen you right out.

Living here is how I got obsessed with computer astronomy.  Although it really cant ever replace visual astronomy, which will always come first, because it gives you a sense of wonder because you are "out there" actually experiencing space.  The ironic thing is the county where I go to where the mountains are, the visual limiting magnitude is only 6.5 there, which is supposed to be "average" (during the time of the ancient Greeks I guess) and yet that 6.5 is considered to be the best for the entire eastern part of the US!  Once upon a time, the skies all over the planet were really that dark lol.  I have no idea what the visual limiting magnitude is where I live in NY, but it can't be higher than 4.  I can barely make out the stars of the Big Dipper and Orion.
If I want to see a lot of stars and dont want the constricted narrow field of view of a telescope I need to use the binoculars or my camera and take a bunch of pictures and stack them (keeping in mind that light pollution makes the sky look chocolaty unless I process the pictures first.)
 
User avatar
midtskogen
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 890
Joined: 11 Dec 2016
Location: Oslo, Norway
Contact:

Astrophotography

10 Dec 2018 13:17

I nice fireball photographed from Sørreisa in northern Norway this afternoon.  Probably looks more impressive than it is due to a thin layer of clouds.

x.jpg


I've just added an automatic extraction of the path, reprojected and rotate so it always forms a straight line to the right:
y.jpg


The next step is to use this isolation of the fireball to do some machine learning and classification so I can get rid of false detections (mostly low altitude aircrafts).
NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
User avatar
Mosfet
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 1391
Joined: 24 Oct 2016
Location: Italy
Contact:

Astrophotography

10 Dec 2018 15:11

midtskogen wrote:
Source of the post automatic extraction of the path [...]

That's awesome
"Time is illusion. Lunchtime doubly so". Douglas N. Adams
My mods | My specs: Asus x555ub - cpu i5-6200u, ram 4gb, gpu nvidia geforce 940m 2gb vram | IRC freenode.net canale ##SpaceEngineITA
 
User avatar
midtskogen
World Builder
World Builder
Posts: 890
Joined: 11 Dec 2016
Location: Oslo, Norway
Contact:

Astrophotography

19 Dec 2018 22:21

A nice 5 second meteor recorded last night.
NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
vlad01
Pioneer
Pioneer
Posts: 407
Joined: 02 May 2018

Astrophotography

15 Jan 2019 17:08

Friend of mine came out last night with his camera gear and few differnt lenses. One being a 600mm tele lens.

Just a learing curve on how to set it all up for astro photos.

Feel free to look at them all.   There is a bunch of multiples here and there that can be stacked.

He wants to get a tracker mount to make better and easier shots. We used a high iso and short exposures to get the least movement but it's a compromise.

Conditions were moon lit and foggy from bush fires during the day but cleared to be okish. Normally get much darker skies than this.

http://deepnighttech.com.au/files/astro ... Jg4gqv2wRA
 
A-L-E-X
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 1725
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

Astrophotography

16 Jan 2019 03:51

Hopefully he can take some nice eclipse photos next Sunday night!
 
vlad01
Pioneer
Pioneer
Posts: 407
Joined: 02 May 2018

Astrophotography

16 Jan 2019 21:31

Apparently it won't be visible from Australia. Meant to happen after the moon has already set here.
 
vlad01
Pioneer
Pioneer
Posts: 407
Joined: 02 May 2018

Astrophotography

16 Jan 2019 21:40

I resized some of the ones I felt were the best shots.



_MG_6149-rs.jpg

_MG_6180-rs.jpg

_MG_6204-rs.jpg

_MG_6211-rs.jpg

_MG_6231-rs.jpg

_MG_6233-rs.jpg

_MG_6235-rs.jpg





One I tried stacking with reasonable success. It reduced the noise to nothing as far as I can see, lost a little detail but not much. total of 12 stacked and one dark frame.



stacked image-resize.png
 
A-L-E-X
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 1725
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

Astrophotography

17 Jan 2019 02:35

Did you try using some free software like Deep Sky Stacker and Sequator, both work great even where there is high light pollution!  And for the moon and planets there is Registax!
 
vlad01
Pioneer
Pioneer
Posts: 407
Joined: 02 May 2018

Astrophotography

17 Jan 2019 02:55

yeah deep sky stacker is what I used.

My friend is looking to get a tracker for low ISO high exposures to get better images in the first place.  Most pics here weren't more than 2 sec exposure on 25600 iso due to the narrow FOV on the 600mm lens.  Even with 2 sec there is smear.   Once a tracker is used then the noise floor can be over come but using a lower ISO and collecting photos over a longer time period.   30 sec exposures and higher are what we aim to do.

On the wide angle we used about 10-20 sec, but such wide angles the smear is not noticeable much.
 
A-L-E-X
Star Engineer
Star Engineer
Posts: 1725
Joined: 06 Mar 2017

Astrophotography

17 Jan 2019 03:33

vlad01 wrote:
yeah deep sky stacker is what I used.

My friend is looking to get a tracker for low ISO high exposures to get better images in the first place.  Most pics here weren't more than 2 sec exposure on 25600 iso due to the narrow FOV on the 600mm lens.  Even with 2 sec there is smear.   Once a tracker is used then the noise floor can be over come but using a lower ISO and collecting photos over a longer time period.   30 sec exposures and higher are what we aim to do.

On the wide angle we used about 10-20 sec, but such wide angles the smear is not noticeable much.

After using DSS you can also use Sequator to show even more stars and control light pollution at the same time.  I first use DSS and then run Sequator after that.  

I use 13 sec exposures myself at 14/28mm, smear from earth's rotation becomes evident at longer exposures, and the ISO I use is either 400 or 800.  What camera do you use?  I have an Olympus mirrorless 4/3.

Here the noise pollution is so high you must make sure you keep the peak of the histogram about 1/3 to at most 1/2 of the way to the right, actually 1/4 to 1/3 is the best because you preserve the colors of the stars and dont blow them out to white.
 
vlad01
Pioneer
Pioneer
Posts: 407
Joined: 02 May 2018

Astrophotography

17 Jan 2019 03:46

I don't have a camera, but my mate's one is a cannon EOS 200d I am pretty sure.

We don't have all that much light pollution, except that night was moon and smoke from fires so it was polluted some.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest