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Phunnie
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Astrophotography

09 Aug 2020 13:56

latest wip, got 2 nights in, but it's going to be cloudy again for a while
Image
Oh. I have a youtube channel. https://www.youtube.com/c/Phunnie
 
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FastFourierTransform
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Astrophotography

10 Aug 2020 02:44

Wow! That's the North America Nebula, right?
 
A-L-E-X
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Astrophotography

10 Aug 2020 07:42

wow what kind of camera?  Monochrome CCD?

Also, I have a question about the Perseids (peaking Tuesday night.)  Why do some meteors look green?
 
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Phunnie
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10 Aug 2020 10:39

Monochrome CMOS. ZWO ASI 1600-MM.
Oh. I have a youtube channel. https://www.youtube.com/c/Phunnie
 
A-L-E-X
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Astrophotography

11 Aug 2020 22:50

Thanks!

On a note about a different kind of storm, the Perseids are really good tonight!  Around 11 PM I saw a few really bright ones that seemed to pass just over my house!  One really notable one that changed color from golden to red and after it streaked across really low I heard a sound, almost like the sound of a pebble hitting something?  Would that be a bolide?  How are the sky conditions over there?  I'm still in the Poconos for a couple more days.
 
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midtskogen
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Astrophotography

12 Aug 2020 06:47

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Why do some meteors look green?

Green is often associated with evaporated nickel.  But it's complex.  Most of the light you see from meteors is not the meteoroid itself glowing, but the surrounding air glowing from the immense pressure caused by the meteoroid.  So speed is a major factor for what colour you see, possibly also altitude.  And certainly altitude above the horizon.  Near the horizon meteors become red, just like the setting sun.
Perseids, however, look blue to me,  but I've never seen Perseids in proper darkness.  It's still a bit early for night sky observation over here.
NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
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Phunnie
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Astrophotography

13 Aug 2020 05:27

Image
Some more progress on the mosaic. Still 20 or so frames missing on the right panels, but hydrogen is almost done!
Oh. I have a youtube channel. https://www.youtube.com/c/Phunnie
 
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Watsisname
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Astrophotography

24 Aug 2020 16:46

Moved some recent Q&A about meteors and their colors, altitudes, and possible sounds associated with them to the Science and Astronomy Q&A thread. There's actually quite a few interesting tangents and the conversation may be continued there. :)
 
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pzampella
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25 Aug 2020 13:27

Last week I achieved one of the most beautiful astrophotos I have ever taken. It is the region of the Sagittarius bow, where the center of pur galaxy lies.

These are 40x60s light frames stacked and processed in Pixinsight along with darks, dark flats, flats and bias frames.

► Show Spoiler


Opinions and critics?

Feel free to download it and check it at full resolution: https://photos.app.goo.gl/KMXLaGsRo93FjKYUA

PS: As a bonus, I'll share this edited version with most of the more interesting objects in the picture:
► Show Spoiler
Last edited by pzampella on 26 Aug 2020 04:13, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Watsisname
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Astrophotography

25 Aug 2020 17:49

pzampella, that is amazing! What even is there to critique? :) Everything looks crisp and the colors and nebulosity came out beautifully. And it looks very natural, not over-processed at all. Love it!
 
Mr. Abner
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Astrophotography

25 Aug 2020 23:49

pzampella wrote:
Last week I achieved one of the most beautiful astrophotos I have ever taken. It is the region of the Sagittarius bow, where the center of pur galaxy lies.

These are 40x60s light frames stacked and processed in Pixinsight along with darks, dark flats, flats and bias frames.

► Show Spoiler


Opinions and critics?

Feel free to download it and check it at full resolution: https://photos.app.goo.gl/KMXLaGsRo93FjKYUA

Beautiful! Have you counted the stars in it yet? :D
 
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pzampella
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Astrophotography

26 Aug 2020 01:24

Watsisname wrote:
pzampella, that is amazing! What even is there to critique? :) Everything looks crisp and the colors and nebulosity came out beautifully. And it looks very natural, not over-processed at all. Love it!

Thank you, Watsisname! I really liked it, but maybe there is something that some of the experts here could point out to make it better :D

Mr. Abner wrote:
Beautiful! Have you counted the stars in it yet? :D

Thank you, Mr. Abner! I haven't count it, but we could approximate it.
The picture has 6897x10373 pixels. So, taking 3 randomly placed areas of 207x139 pixels (each one representing the 0,04% of the whole picture's area), and counting the stars inside this areas, we get an average of 56 stars. Extrapolating this to the whole picture, it would be a total of 140,000 stars!
It would be really cool is some other people makes the same calculation, and see what we using with different areas  ;)
 
A-L-E-X
Star Engineer
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Astrophotography

04 Sep 2020 22:26

what is the magnitude of the dimmest star?  you can use astrobin to map it!
 
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pzampella
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Astrophotography

09 Sep 2020 16:09

A-L-E-X, I have no idea! Maybe 12 or something like that?

How do I use Astrobin for that? I just signed up, but I see no map or anything like what you mention.
 
Mr. Abner
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Astrophotography

09 Sep 2020 22:04

pzampella wrote:
Watsisname wrote:
pzampella, that is amazing! What even is there to critique? :) Everything looks crisp and the colors and nebulosity came out beautifully. And it looks very natural, not over-processed at all. Love it!

Thank you, Watsisname! I really liked it, but maybe there is something that some of the experts here could point out to make it better :D

Mr. Abner wrote:
Beautiful! Have you counted the stars in it yet? :D

Thank you, Mr. Abner! I haven't count it, but we could approximate it.
The picture has 6897x10373 pixels. So, taking 3 randomly placed areas of 207x139 pixels (each one representing the 0,04% of the whole picture's area), and counting the stars inside this areas, we get an average of 56 stars. Extrapolating this to the whole picture, it would be a total of 140,000 stars!
It would be really cool is some other people makes the same calculation, and see what we using with different areas  ;)

Ha! I wasn't expecting that, nicely done. :)

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