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Phunnie
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22 May 2020 00:53

Going to spend all summer (probably) on making this 3x2 mosaic
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Last edited by Phunnie on 23 May 2020 01:03, edited 1 time in total.
Oh. I have a youtube channel. https://www.youtube.com/c/Phunnie
 
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Zi7ar21
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22 May 2020 11:20

It would be epic if you had full high res download after for a computer wallpaper
- Proud Owner of: Space Engine and Space Engine PRO
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pzampella
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21 Jun 2020 15:39

Hi! I recently decided to create a blog where I will be posting my photos, with the idea of making it a place where it is possible to see the progression. The main idea is to make it a place for discussion and learning, and also to help those who are starting in the astrophotography world.

Here there is the link: https://backyardastrophotography.weebly.com/
 
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Cantra
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02 Jul 2020 11:29

The moon last night with some photo editing. All of this is done by holding my phone camera up to the lens.

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Jupiter.

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A-L-E-X
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02 Jul 2020 14:41

You can actually see at least one or two of Jupiter's moons!
 
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Watsisname
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11 Jul 2020 05:15

Comet C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE), a few hours ago. I would rate this the best comet I have seen visually since Hale-Bopp in 1997.

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midtskogen
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11 Jul 2020 13:41

Nice pictures!  This picture was not taken by me, but by Anders Steen Brandt at TV2 Vejret last night (Denmark): 
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Comet and noctilucent clouds!

I'm currently in northern Norway, so I have been unable to see this comet.
NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
vlad01
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11 Jul 2020 18:35

Only good comets I have seen was c/2006 p1 McNaught back in 2007, it was lucky it was a southern hemisphere one, most of the other good ones have be northern ones.
 
A-L-E-X
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14 Jul 2020 13:10

Wat, how bright is this compared to Hale-Bopp in 1997?  I remember seeing that comet clearly from NYC!

It will be closest to the earth on July 22nd and so that should be the best night to see it?  is that when it will be highest in the NW sky 90 min after sunset too?

Why do new comets get such boring names now like Neowise?  I miss the days when comets were named after actual people, not inanimate robotic telescopes that dont appreciate the honor......
 
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Watsisname
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16 Jul 2020 01:57

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Wat, how bright is this compared to Hale-Bopp in 1997?  I remember seeing that comet clearly from NYC!

Not as bright as Hale-Bopp. You can probably spot the small bright fuzzy dot of the coma of NEOWISE from within a city with binocs, but otherwise to enjoy seeing the whole thing with the naked eye you need a fairly dark sky.
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post It will be closest to the earth on July 22nd and so that should be the best night to see it?

Depends on latitude, and it is a balance between the comet getting higher in the sky and easier to pick up from the twilight, vs. growing dimmer as it gets farther from the Sun.  For you, anytime in the next week is probably good. :)
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I miss the days when comets were named after actual people, not inanimate robotic telescopes that dont appreciate the honor......

I'm sure the team of scientists and engineers who worked on the satellite and its extended NEOWISE mission appreciate it. Naming the comet after the craft also helps more people to learn about it and recognize the importance of funding projects like these. One of the most important things NEOWISE does is discover more asteroids that could potentially threaten Earth. On that note, Scott Manley has a nice video about the comet and how it was discovered.

 
A-L-E-X
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16 Jul 2020 16:23

Watsisname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Wat, how bright is this compared to Hale-Bopp in 1997?  I remember seeing that comet clearly from NYC!

Not as bright as Hale-Bopp. You can probably spot the small bright fuzzy dot of the coma of NEOWISE from within a city with binocs, but otherwise to enjoy seeing the whole thing with the naked eye you need a fairly dark sky.
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post It will be closest to the earth on July 22nd and so that should be the best night to see it?

Depends on latitude, and it is a balance between the comet getting higher in the sky and easier to pick up from the twilight, vs. growing dimmer as it gets farther from the Sun.  For you, anytime in the next week is probably good. :)
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I miss the days when comets were named after actual people, not inanimate robotic telescopes that dont appreciate the honor......

I'm sure the team of scientists and engineers who worked on the satellite and its extended NEOWISE mission appreciate it. Naming the comet after the craft also helps more people to learn about it and recognize the importance of funding projects like these. One of the most important things NEOWISE does is discover more asteroids that could potentially threaten Earth. On that note, Scott Manley has a nice video about the comet and how it was discovered.


ah, I guess I just like the personality of a name like "Hale-Bopp" for some reason lol.
That's sad it wont be as bright as that comet, when would you say is the best time to see it?  I need for it to be a bit higher up in the sky.  I saw a graphic that shows it will be 35 degrees above the horizon in NY on Jul 30, but will it be 3rd mag or brighter at that point?  I figured Jul 23rd might be a better time to see it, when it's closest to Earth.

Wat take a look at this great pic taken of it.  I was shocked to learn that he didn't need tracking at this focal length (300mm EFL) and a 5 sec exposure.  I guess comets dont need to follow the 400 rule!

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64154551
 
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Watsisname
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16 Jul 2020 18:37

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post I saw a graphic that shows it will be 35 degrees above the horizon in NY on Jul 30, but will it be 3rd mag or brighter at that point? 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯   Comet magnitudes are notoriously unpredictable. We expect it to fade to around magnitude 5 or 6 by July 30th, but it could brighten suddenly, or it could disintegrate. My advice: look for it whenever you can.
 
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Watsisname
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18 Jul 2020 23:53

The dusty tail of NEOWISE is definitely growing fainter and less impressive, but at the same time it is getting higher and farther from the twilight, and its green coma and faint blue ion tail are becoming easier to see. :) 

Image
 
vlad01
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19 Jul 2020 00:33

Nice, I'm hoping to see it here in Aus around the 28th but I don't like my chances.
 
A-L-E-X
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19 Jul 2020 17:10

I'm going to look for it this week, Wat!  I will have access to non light polluted skies next weekend so hopefully it is still good by then!  Did you track that magnificent image, Wat?  I dont see any star trails ;-)

I need some help with something else though.  I have an 8" SCT that has a 38mm baffle tube diameter (Nexstar 8) and I have a 0.63 Celestron focal reducer/flattener for it that turns it from a 2000mm f/10 scope to 1280mm f/6.3.  This also narrows the baffle tube diameter to 24mm.  What is the largest size camera sensor I can use with that combo that wont vignete?  I'm thinking M43 (21.6mm diagonal), because both APSC (28.8mm) and FF (43.2mm) are larger than the baffle tube diameter using the reducer.  I also have the flange distance (which calculates how far the sensor is from the focal plane) and that's 19.25mm for M43.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flange_focal_distance

Whatever sensor size it is, I'm thinking it has to be smaller than the baffle tube diameter with the reducer to not have vignetting.  And the farther back the sensor is the smaller it has to be.

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