Ultimate space simulation software

 
A-L-E-X
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Science and Astronomy Videos

26 Sep 2019 16:24

Watsisname wrote:


Not all science papers/talks are about the researcher presenting a new discovery, or persuading you that their model of something works and that they understand it and how useful it is for science that they understand it.  In this case the claim is that something is weird with the stellar populations in globular clusters, which is quite inconvenient for our understanding of them, and that all the models that have tried to explain this so far in fact do not work.

I love these kinds of talks.  :)

they leave us with more questions than answers :)
 
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26 Sep 2019 16:28

DoctorOfSpace wrote:
JackDole wrote:
Source of the post be it through wars or through an irreparably destroyed environment


Common neglect seems unlikely to be a great filter when we are already on the verge of colonizing other worlds.

A more likely great filter may just be reaching technological mastery and peaking with nowhere left to go or nothing left to discover leading to decay.  Dyson swarms may not even be needed to reach this point.

permanent human colonies in space within 200 years, Doc?
 
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Unknown Facts About Exoplanets

27 Sep 2019 09:19

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Hi!


If you are interested in exoplanets, you might want to know these little known facts about exoplanets.

Source:
 

  1. In our stellar neighborhood there might be around 130 potentially (p.) habitable exoplanets, 10 of them being Earth-like.
  2. The closest p. Earth-like planet is called Tau Ceti e, and it is located only 12 light years away from us.
  3. So far, we have sent a targeted radio message to 2 p. habitable exoplanets, Tau Ceti e and Luyten b. Any reply would be received as of 2037 and 2041, respectively.
  4. Amateur astronomers have discovered 2 p. habitable exoplanets: LHS-1140 b and K2-288 B b.
  5. It is possible to detect exoplanets by using a tele-photo lens with an aperture of less than 50 mm.
Hope you learnt something knew!
 
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Unknown Facts About Exoplanets

27 Sep 2019 23:07

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Why couldn't this be posted in in the Science & Astronomy Videos channel? Why does this post need a whole separate topic to itself?
Futurum Fusionem
 
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27 Sep 2019 23:26

Futurum Fusionem
 
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Unknown Facts About Exoplanets

28 Sep 2019 00:35

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Stellarator wrote:
Why couldn't this be posted in in the Science & Astronomy Videos channel? Why does this post need a whole separate topic to itself?

Actually since habitable exoplanets are such a fascinating subject, it might be useful for them to have a topic unto themselves.  Posts in megathreads quickly get buried.   I believe alfa is a professional astronomer who does research in this field.  I like that exoplanets can be detected with a 50mm lens- I didn't know that!  I assume I can do this with my mirrorless EPL-6 camera?
 
alfa015
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Unknown Facts About Exoplanets

28 Sep 2019 10:10

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A-L-E-X wrote:
Stellarator wrote:
Why couldn't this be posted in in the Science & Astronomy Videos channel? Why does this post need a whole separate topic to itself?

Actually since habitable exoplanets are such a fascinating subject, it might be useful for them to have a topic unto themselves.  Posts in megathreads quickly get buried.   I believe alfa is a professional astronomer who does research in this field.  I like that exoplanets can be detected with a 50mm lens- I didn't know that!  I assume I can do this with my mirrorless EPL-6 camera?


I think you could.
Here how to do it: https://spectrum.ieee.org/geek-life/hands-on/diy-exoplanet-detector
 
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Unknown Facts About Exoplanets

28 Sep 2019 21:31

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A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Posts in megathreads quickly get buried

This is something we must all suffer, and does not justify the creation of a whole new thread for one video. If people are interested, then they will see the post in the relevant thread and respond.
Futurum Fusionem
 
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Unknown Facts About Exoplanets

03 Oct 2019 23:27

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alfa015 wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Stellarator wrote:
Why couldn't this be posted in in the Science & Astronomy Videos channel? Why does this post need a whole separate topic to itself?

Actually since habitable exoplanets are such a fascinating subject, it might be useful for them to have a topic unto themselves.  Posts in megathreads quickly get buried.   I believe alfa is a professional astronomer who does research in this field.  I like that exoplanets can be detected with a 50mm lens- I didn't know that!  I assume I can do this with my mirrorless EPL-6 camera?

I think you could.
Here how to do it: https://spectrum.ieee.org/geek-life/hands-on/diy-exoplanet-detector

https://spectrum.ieee.org/geek-life/hands-on/diy-exoplanet-detector
Thanks, I had a specific lens in mind, would the 40-150mm lens (f4-f5.6) be enough?  It has a 10mm aperture at wide and a 27mm aperture at full tele.
 
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Watsisname
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11 Oct 2019 13:30



Fantastic talk (though a bit more technical than most that I post here) and review of our current understanding of an old astrophysics problem: "Why do some stars explode?"  More precisely, what exactly is going on during the core collapse that allows the ensuing shockwave to reach the star's surface, rather than stall?  If you think this should be trivial, you'd be surprised!
 
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13 Oct 2019 02:13

Watsisname wrote:


Fantastic talk (though a bit more technical than most that I post here) and review of our current understanding of an old astrophysics problem: "Why do some stars explode?"  More precisely, what exactly is going on during the core collapse that allows the ensuing shockwave to reach the star's surface, rather than stall?  If you think this should be trivial, you'd be surprised!

Far from being trivial, isn't this how most elements beyond Iron get produced?  We are indeed made of star stuff!
 
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Watsisname
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13 Oct 2019 03:07

A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Far from being trivial, isn't this how most elements beyond Iron get produced? 

Actually no, most elements above atomic number 40 came from colliding neutron stars rather than exploding stars.

But what I mean about it not being trivial is the question of how does the star explode?  Most people know that they do, and are familiar with the common explanation for how it happens.  But if you do a naive (or even a very sophisticated) application of physics to explain how it works, you will conclude that the shockwave would stall before reaching the surface.  How a star actually explodes was an astrophysics mystery for many decades.  

What we're finding with the latest high resolution 3D supercomputer simulations is that the physics happening is a lot more complex (and very fascinating), and it turns out that turbulence and huge deviations from spherical symmetry are important, in addition to the momentum transported by the neutrinos (which we suspected, but it wasn't enough), and the structure of the star itself.
 
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13 Oct 2019 03:17

Watsisname wrote:
A-L-E-X wrote:
Source of the post Far from being trivial, isn't this how most elements beyond Iron get produced? 

Actually no, most elements above atomic number 40 came from colliding neutron stars rather than exploding stars.

But what I mean about it not being trivial is the question of how does the star explode?  Most people know that they do, and are familiar with the common explanation for how it happens.  But if you do a naive (or even a very sophisticated) application of physics to explain how it works, you will conclude that the shockwave would stall before reaching the surface.  How a star actually explodes was an astrophysics mystery for many decades.  

What we're finding with the latest high resolution 3D supercomputer simulations is that the physics happening is a lot more complex (and very fascinating), and it turns out that turbulence and huge deviations from spherical symmetry are important, in addition to the momentum transported by the neutrinos (which we suspected, but it wasn't enough), and the structure of the star itself.

Ah, I thought that higher atomic number elements (like gold, silver, platinum, even uranium and beyond) get produced in supernova explosions and thats how we happened to have these on our planet (because the cloud from which our sun originated was the result of a supernova explosion?)
That's a very interesting link, neutrinos and the geometry of the star seem to be vital in transporting the energy to the surface.
Secondary question- since there are different types of supernova explosions and even hypernovae, what's the determining factor in the type of explosion that will happen?  Also, are there cases where stars are on the brink of exploding but never explode or explosions that never actually reach the surface?  Whats the final result of that?  Does the interior collapse and the outer part of the star becomes like a "ghost shell" that expands outwards and eventually fades from view as it expands?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uD4izuDMUQA

That is an amazing video timelapse of the universe, with informative videos from several cosmologists and physicists:

Concept, music, writing, edit, and visual effects by melodysheep, with additional visual material sourced from:

NASA Goddard
Google
SpaceX
2012
Geostorm
Into the Universe with Stephen Hawking
BMW X1 
Journey to the Edge of the Universe
Noah
How the Universe Works
Deep Impact
Wonders of the Universe
Moon raker vfx reel
Voyage of Time

Voice sample sources:

Attenborough Davos Speech https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuudP...
Craig Childs - Long Now Talk http://longnow.org/seminars/02013/jul...
Brian Cox - Wonders of the Universe Episode 1 
Neil deGrasse Tyson interview with Bill Moyers https://vimeo.com/84075447
How the Universe Works - Season 3 Episode 2 
Will The Universe Ever End with Lawrence Krauss https://www.closertotruth.com/series/...
Janna Levin TED Talk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLz9T...
A Brief History of Time (1991) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAfxK...
What Happens in the Far Far Future https://www.closertotruth.com/series/...
Sean Carroll TEDxCaltech https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMaTy...
Alex Filippenko - TEDxSF https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gAtP...
To Infinity and Beyond: The Accelerating Universe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcKdA...
Martin Rees interview http://www.closertotruth.com/series/w...
Last edited by A-L-E-X on 15 Nov 2019 07:25, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Watsisname
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14 Nov 2019 00:57



Abstract:
To date, Hubble has played the definitive role in the characterization of exoplanet atmospheres. From the first planets available, we have learned that their atmospheres are incredibly diverse. With HST, JWST, and TESS a new era of atmospheric studies is opening up, where wide scale comparative planetology is now possible. Such studies can provide insight into the underlying physical process through comparative studies. Hubble’s full spectroscopic capabilities are now being used to produce the first large-scale, simultaneous UVOIR comparative study of 20 exoplanets ranging from super-Earth to Neptune and Jupiter sizes. With full UV to infrared wavelength coverage, an entire planet’s atmosphere can be probed simultaneously and with sufficient numbers of planets, it will be possible to statistically compare their features with physical parameters. The panchromatic treasury program aims at build a lasting HST legacy, providing the UV and blue-optical exoplanet spectra which will be unavailable to JWST, providing key insights into clouds and mass loss. I will review the highlights of the program to date, which include atmospheric water resolved in emission and new absorption features seen in transmission such as escaping ionized metals. I will also present the latest findings from the ongoing Hubble Treasury program and discuss synergies with JWST.
 
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The Square Kilometre Array

15 Nov 2019 15:07

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As some of you probably know, the Square Kilometre Array will become the biggest radio telescope on Earth, with a collecting area of 1 square kilometre.


The construction will start in 2021 and the first light is expected to take place in 2027. It will cover the frequencies from 50 MHz to 15 Ghz.

But what I wanted to share with you guys is a new study about how far the SKA can 'listen'.

A recent study points out that the SKA could detect extraterrestrial airport radars 200 light years away.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ayqyb8XCtE0

What do you guys think?

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