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problemecium
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05 Jan 2017 20:37

I'm pleased to see that not only was the Kugelblitz Challenge not a trick question (i.e. neither works and I was too dumb to figure out why) but that I successfully determined which one it was. I couldn't be arsed to draw a Penrose diagram about it, though, so I never did submit an answer. I just learned about Penrose diagrams rather recently from an earlier episode of Space Time and while I find them hauntingly beautiful I don't quite feel qualified to wrangle them myself.
It does give me a really pwntastic idea for a minimap for SE or my own game though - have an old-school radar circle but with a Penrose transformation applied so that it represents a vast swath of space but only highlights stuff as it gets close to your ship.
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Watsisname
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05 Jan 2017 23:41

That's a cool idea.  In the literature we don't usually show the (curvy) lines of constant space and time on the Penrose diagram -- the way PBS Space Time draws it is pretty slick.  Almost looks like a gemstone.

DoctorOfSpace  I'm finding myself enjoying that channel more and more.
 
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DoctorOfSpace
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06 Jan 2017 01:07

Watsisname wrote:
Source of the post Given how complex the techniques for obtaining the image is, their doubt would almost be justified. :p

My brother is one of those people, a fervent believer in the Electric Universe.  Which is fine, but I currently live with him and he brings this up often :?




 
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Hornblower
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07 Jan 2017 14:41

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - Douglas Adams
 
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Watsisname
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07 Jan 2017 23:16

DoctorOfSpace wrote:
My brother is one of those people, a fervent believer in the Electric Universe.  Which is fine, but I currently live with him and he brings this up often :?

I feel your pain.  It's a troublesome thing for the professional astronomers too.  I mean they have no idea how plasmas work.  They would have to go through a course on Electricity and Magnetism and like, no university astrophysics program offers that.

Love the video on gravitational waves.  Rana Adhikari is fantastic. :)
 
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midtskogen
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08 Jan 2017 08:03

Speech recognition is also fascinating, but proof reading is advisable before publishing.
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NIL DIFFICILE VOLENTI
 
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problemecium
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08 Jan 2017 12:11

lol
Reminds me of a poorly translated instruction pamphlet I read once that said "Remember, the hardness affect protection, the thickness affect sensitivity."

...It was for a cell phone screen protector xD
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Hornblower
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11 Jan 2017 05:35

Interesting! So where there are mountains, the crust goes lower than flat areas?
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11 Jan 2017 08:53

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problemecium
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11 Jan 2017 22:07

Hornblower wrote:
So where there are mountains, the crust goes lower than flat areas?

Indeed it does. The land is heavier, after all, and while the continents assuredly do not float in the ocean, they do in fact float on the asthenosphere (liquid part of the upper mantle), so if it get thicker, it sinks in further to maintain the displacement ratio.
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