Ultimate space simulation software

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by Watsisname
22 Jan 2019 01:30
Forum: Science and Astronomy Discussions
Topic: Astrophotography
Replies: 312
Views: 36160

Astrophotography

Stellarator , JackDole , Gnargenox is referring to a small asteroid hitting the Moon during the eclipse.  Impacts big enough for the flash to be observed from Earth actually happen fairly often. :) Smp7TqccTpY I checked if any of my photos might have captured it, but alas no.  The impact happened j...
by Watsisname
21 Jan 2019 01:23
Forum: Off-topic Discussions
Topic: General global warming / climate chage discussion
Replies: 145
Views: 22854

General global warming / climate chage discussion

One thing to be cautious with when reviewing studies of the effects of CO2 and warming on crops is how they isolate (or not) the effects.  Controlled greenhouse studies show the fertilization effect of increasing CO2 concentration, but this is not uniform across all types of crops.  Adding in the ef...
by Watsisname
21 Jan 2019 00:43
Forum: Science and Astronomy Discussions
Topic: Science and Astronomy Questions
Replies: 1366
Views: 135724

Science and Astronomy Questions

This photo (taken within 1 minute of maximum eclipse) could probably be used to estimate my location relatively accurately (ignoring that it's shown in my profile).  But perhaps more interestingly, if there are other people with photos showing the stars near the Moon taken at the same time and from...
by Watsisname
21 Jan 2019 00:06
Forum: Science and Astronomy Discussions
Topic: Astrophotography
Replies: 312
Views: 36160

Astrophotography

At my house it was mostly cloudy, with new clouds forming over the hill the Moon had risen behind, and I only got one brief view as totality began.  Decided to drive around to try elsewhere, and sure enough as soon as I got away from the hills, the sky opened up and stayed clear the whole time.  It'...
by Watsisname
20 Jan 2019 22:22
Forum: Science and Astronomy Discussions
Topic: Astrophotography
Replies: 312
Views: 36160

Astrophotography

Managed to avoid the clouds for this one. :)

Image
by Watsisname
20 Jan 2019 06:41
Forum: Science and Astronomy Discussions
Topic: Science and Astronomy Questions
Replies: 1366
Views: 135724

Science and Astronomy Questions

26457 How strong would the laser have to be to stop that object from moving away or even just slowing it down enough so we could study it further? Assuming you're referring to 'Oumuamua?  It would have to be so strong that it would generate particle/antiparticle pairs out of the vacuum (I'm not eve...
by Watsisname
20 Jan 2019 04:01
Forum: Off-topic Discussions
Topic: General global warming / climate chage discussion
Replies: 145
Views: 22854

General global warming / climate chage discussion

26452 The human caused 6th mass extinction is already underway and half of species in the wild will likely be extinct by 2100. Although the rate of extinction right now is comparable to the rate of extinction seen in the fossil record, this is a deeply flawed comparison.  The fossil record preferen...
by Watsisname
20 Jan 2019 03:52
Forum: Science and Astronomy Discussions
Topic: Science and Astronomy Questions
Replies: 1366
Views: 135724

Science and Astronomy Questions

It is much easier to accelerate something to 0.2c by laser than it is to accelerate it to -0.2c (i.e. pull back towards you that fast).  The latter would be like shooting a bullet at a target and expecting the target to fly straight back at you.  Doesn't work that way, since momentum must be conserv...
by Watsisname
20 Jan 2019 02:50
Forum: Science and Astronomy Discussions
Topic: Science and Astronomy Questions
Replies: 1366
Views: 135724

Science and Astronomy Questions

Using a laser as a "tractor beam" is surprisingly easy to do at home, provided a laser with sufficiently high power, adjustable focus, and a good Gaussian beam profile.  The way this works is due to the momentum carried by light, and small objects can be levitated and even moved around wit...
by Watsisname
19 Jan 2019 03:15
Forum: Off-topic Discussions
Topic: The Future of Humanity & Intelligent life in the universe
Replies: 337
Views: 58034

The Future of Humanity & Intelligent life in the universe

The hardest part about getting something to it -- and getting meaningful data back -- is that if we send something there in a reasonable time then it will be very hard to slow down once it gets there. 'Oumuamua is (we think) less than 1 km across, so getting data from a high speed flyby is even more...
by Watsisname
18 Jan 2019 22:47
Forum: Off-topic Discussions
Topic: The Future of Humanity & Intelligent life in the universe
Replies: 337
Views: 58034

The Future of Humanity & Intelligent life in the universe

26418 Although I don't necessarily disagree with you here, it does seem to be a bit of a logical fallacy on your part to scoff at the alien probe hypothesis while accepting it's no less extreme natural origin. Accepting a hypothesis requires that we test and isolate that hypothesis as the only work...
by Watsisname
18 Jan 2019 06:22
Forum: Science and Astronomy Discussions
Topic: Science and Astronomy Questions
Replies: 1366
Views: 135724

Science and Astronomy Questions

A different spin on the question:   What is the most time dilation we could get by accelerating at 1g?   If we find a 10 billion solar mass black hole (about the most massive that we know of), then hovering at 12.66 horizon radii would yield about 9.8m/s 2  of gravitational acceleration, wi...
by Watsisname
18 Jan 2019 05:38
Forum: Off-topic Discussions
Topic: Unusual weather
Replies: 277
Views: 51162

Unusual weather

26214 My seismometer, however, has drowned in noise from a million waves crashing into the coast a 1000 km away. Wow!  This also really puts into perspective the challenges for the LIGO gravitational wave detector here in Washington.  If I recall right, they simply don't bother observing whenever t...
by Watsisname
18 Jan 2019 05:34
Forum: Off-topic Discussions
Topic: Show your desktop!
Replies: 53
Views: 21336

Show your desktop!

Nyarlasothoth , that's very nice.  I'm not sure if it's the same program, but the setup reminds me a lot of Rainmeter, which I used way back in the day and loved it: https://images-wixmp-ed30a86b8c4ca887773594c2.wixmp.com/intermediary/f/7a52cf34-11d1-4fa6-a2f9-e0c6b0edf6f8/d2qdqyx-2e8012b4-0d54-430...
by Watsisname
18 Jan 2019 05:12
Forum: Science and Astronomy Discussions
Topic: Science and Astronomy Questions
Replies: 1366
Views: 135724

Science and Astronomy Questions

26398 Wat- how fast would we have to accelerate to complete this 6 month "trip" in let's say one hour?  95% of the speed of light? *chuckles*   6 months in 1 hour is a time dilation factor of 4380.  To achieve this by special relativity, we must travel at a speed of 0.9999999739c, or 7.81...